Public Libraries

Drinks yes, food no

The Park Ridge (Illinois) public library has ended its summer trial of allowing food in the library. Patrons are still permitted to consume non-alcoholic beverages, though. Story in the Chicago Tribune.

Library mystery absorbs alderman

*Updated link, sorry about that*
Here is a story from the Chicago Sun-Times about an alderman who is trying to figure out why his regional library is removing \"books in good condition.\" Ald. Eugene Shulter has community activists \"up in arms\" over what seems to be routine weeding. Security has twice attempted to have him removed from the library. Folks, this is not a good example of community relations.

Bookmobiles Still Going Strong

Bookmobiles are still going strong in PA. Currently there is at least one bookmobile in 25 Pennsylvania counties. The program began in 1977 with a single bookmobile. The bookmobiles are especially popular in rural areas without a local library. From the Tribune-Review

Library turtle retires - paper calls it a libraria

Steven Bell writes \"On 9/3/01 the Philadelphia Inquirer reported a story about a surburan Public Library, in Abington Township, that held a retirement party for its library pet, a turtle called Eltrut. This would be a fairly standard story, but the Inquirer actually identified the turtle as a librarian. As if our public image wasn\'t bad enough, and the public didn\'t already think that everyone who worked in the library was a librarian, now the Inquirer refers to the library pet as a librarian. The story is found
Here \".

Students losing part-time home when main library locks doors

Wayne Risher from the Memphis, TN
Commercial
Appeal
news writes: \"Like it or not,
libraries
are
day cares, hangouts and meeting spots, as well as
places for bookish pursuits. \"

The Central Library will be closing for two months to
move to a new building. Parents and kids are having to
find other \"day care\" options. Day care centers have
noticed a slight increase in enrollment.

\"A couple of parents have told me they\'re signing up
because the library is closing,\" said Thomas. \"I think
we\'re going to get a lot.\"
Full Story

Last Longing Look at 5 Public Libraries

Baltimore citizens said a sad goodbye Saturday to five city libraries shuttered by budget cuts:

Yesterday, the last day in the lives of five city libraries, played to a small but sad audience.
As Carla D. Hayden, director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, made a farewell tour to thank librarians in all five branches she chose for closure, many people paid their last respects to beloved neighborhood beacons in all corners of Baltimore, from Pimlico to Fells Point.

One woman from far outside the city made a pilgrimage to her past . . . \"This was my childhood library,\" she said. \"I\'m a librarian because of it. I could walk here.\"

More from the Baltimore Sun.

County library patrons doing a cushy job

Are comfy chairs an issue at your library?

Patti Brandt from the Bay City Times writes about the selection of chairs at the Bay County Library System:

\"Staff members there have been asking visitors for the last week or so to rate six different chairs on size, comfort and eye appeal...Thomas Birch, managing librarian of the Bay City Branch, said choosing a chair is a very subjective matter.\"Full Story

Smackdown at the Library

Bob Cox passed along a A Short Story on that WWF read-in that happened in MI the other day. WWF stars Stacy Keibler and Rhyno did the reading.


\"We\'re going for the reluctant reader, the male teenager that the WWF appeals to,\"

Librarians Becoming Reluctant Babysitters

The Seattle Public Library System has been forced to formulate a policy to address the issue of unattended children being left at its branches:

At the Columbia branch on Rainier Avenue South, young-adult librarian Sarah Webb recalled a 3-year-old who often came with an older sister and then was left alone, or three little girls from 5 to 8 years old who were being left at the library more than six hours a day. \"Sometimes they get bored,\" Webb said. \"They run out of stuff to do. They get antsy. They\'re here six hours with nothing to eat.\"

A formal policy would provide guidance for staffers, who have typically been trained in library science, not child welfare. . .

More from the The Seattle Times.

Where are the child welfare authorities? And ALA wonders why so few people are interested in public library work . . .

African Public Libraries: A Literature Survey

I missed this when it appeared in March - here\'s hoping it hasn\'t been posted before:

The African public library systems have failed to respond to the needs of their constituency. The problems faced by these systems are multi-faceted but can be divided into five broad categories: the introduction of an anachronistic and inappropriate colonial model, inadequate training of library staff, deficiencies in determining specific needs through analysis, lack of cooperation among agencies involved in library-related work, and the absence of sustained efforts to achieve an alternative framework. In this literature survey, these problems will be discussed and recommendations made for addressing some of the issues. A table will also be provided detailing the ideal African public library system.

More from LIBRES.

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