Public Libraries

Los Angeles' library cards could double as identification, debit cards

A Los Angeles City Council committee unanimously approved the proposal from Councilman Richard Alarcon. The ID card would include a resident’s photograph, full name, address, date of birth and details on height, weight, and hair and eye color. The card would not be a driver’s license and could not be used as an ID to board a plane. The card could also be a pre-paid debit card that allows residents to build credit.

Why the Brooklyn Public Library Changed My Life

"I have been able to make a difference in the lives of others, and in my own life because of the opportunities and programs I found at my local Iibrary. It was definitely one of the most rewarding jobs I could have ever done. It has made me stronger, more skilled and equipped for the working world and more confident in who I am as a person. I can truly say I've discovered a lot about myself because of the summers I've spent in programs at the library. Brooklyn Public Library has forever changed my life."

Michigan libraries can't ban guns, court of appeals rules

Though it said the idea of people openly carrying weapons into libraries is “alarming,” libraries can’t ban weapons, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled today.
In a 2-1 decision, the court said it’s up to the state, not local government units, to regulate matters related to firearms.
“Certainly, at a time where this country has witnessed tragic and horrific mass shootings in places of public gathering, the presence of weapons in a library where people of all ages — particularly our youth — gather is alarming and an issue of great concern,” Judges Jame Beckering and Henry William Saad said in the majority opinion.
However, guns are a matter for the state to regulate while complying with the federal constitution, the judges said.

Rural WASHINGTON library patrons lose bookmobile, replace it with express branch

"I was concerned that there wasn't going to be any library service," said Kysar, who lives in Yacolt. "I called to see what the plan was, and there wasn't any plan."

At the same time Kysar was talking to representatives from the library district, other community members began talking to Jeff Carothers, then a mayoral candidate and now mayor, about opening a library branch in the rural community just north of Battle Ground, which reported a population of 1,556 in the 2010 census.

[That's Washington, NOT Oregon...oops]

St. Lawrence County NY to eliminate all library funding

“We’re not going down without a fight," Swafford says. "A gentle fight. Just to say, we’re hearing we’re serving our patrons. We’re doing our best to keep up with technology, which isn’t cheap. We offer so many services that so many services do not and cannot. We’re open two evenings a week when other agencies are closed.”

Introducing the Library Nurse

Daniel Lopez is not a librarian, but one of the nation's first library nurses. He checks the feet of diabetics, takes blood pressure, gives out condoms and intervenes in medical emergencies.

Lopez is Pima County's novel answer to a common issue in public libraries across the country - a growing number of patrons living without shelter, health insurance, medical care or computer access. They come to the library looking not only for resources, but also for safety and protection from the elements. The shaky economy and high unemployment have further fueled the need.

Union slaps Queens Library with lawsuit for Board of Trustees meeting minutes

Members of the union representing Queens Library workers are suing the library officials for refusing to give them copies of minutes from Board of Trustees meetings.

John Hyslop, president of Local 1321, said the legal battle started out with a simple request made in January.

“I did not think the library’s administration would be so adamant about not sharing them,” said Hyslop. “The refusal to share the minutes baffles me, even after they learned of their obligation to provide them.”

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Teenagers, eReaders Still Visit the Library

From Mashable, a report on library use by young people.

According to a study by the Pew Research Center published Tuesday, 16-29 year olds are reading more often, largely because of the mass amounts of e-content that is available to them on mobile devices. They’re not just reading short blips of content, either — people under 30 are reading more long-form content on their smartphones and tablets, but also continuing to visit their local libraries.

Eight in 10 Americans ages 16-29 read a book this past year, and more than six out of 10 used their local public library. Of the people who read this past year, 75 percent read a print book while 19% read an ebook, and 11% listened to an audiobook. Forty six percent used the library for research, 38 percent borrowed books (print books, audiobooks, or ebooks), and 23 percent borrowed newspapers, magazines, or journals.
High schoolers, especially, report borrowing books from libraries.

Ohio Library Snapshot Day

The Star Beacon reports that Henderson Memorial Public Library is taking part in Ohio's Snapshot Day today. The Ohio Library Council is leading the project to try to capture a day in the life of libraries across the 17th largest state so as to highlight the importance of libraries. The sole commenter as of posting time to LISNews derided the effort and called it just another hidden plea for funding while libraries should be embracing austerity measures which is odd as Henderson Memorial Public Library is privately owned and offers service to the public due to a small state subsidy.

On Loving Her Alaskan Library

From the Anchorage Daily News, by Elise Patkotak:

There are great differences between the library of my past and the libraries of the present and future. Some of those differences are simply mindboggling. For instance, in my day a library card meant I could go to a room with a stack of books, choose which I wanted to read and have the books stamped by a nice lady at the desk. Then I got to walk out of the building with my arms full of treasure. Now, a library card means you can sit in the comfort of your own home and download e-books that you can keep for about three weeks before they "return" to the library shelf. How cool is that?

Equally important, perhaps, in a time when we are more and more isolating ourselves from our family and friends through use of electronic media, the library remains a place of vibrant community where ideas can be accessed and shared, discussions held and knowledge gained whether you are rich or poor. It is the ultimate democratizing institution available to everyone in this country.

Today's reality is that if you can't afford a computer, you are at a distinct disadvantage in a very competitive world. Go to the library and find free computer access to anyone with a library card. And that card is also, as always, free. In a world where having information at your fingertips is more critical than ever to succeeding, the library is the one place anyone can go to level the playing field.

Read more here: http://www.adn.com/2012/10/09/2655538/libraries-arent-relics-theyre.html#storylink=cpy

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