Public Libraries

After Modest Life, Huge Gift to 2 NYPL

Mary McConnell Bailey died as quietly as she lived. At her request, no services were held. No obituary was written. Even one of her closest friends cannot say for sure where she is buried.

The library plans to split her bequest: half for programming, materials and resources for the 87 branch libraries in Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island; and half for its four research libraries, according to Ms. Geduldig.

[Thanks Elaine!]

Found in the Comments

This was originally found lurking in the comments today attached to a story dating from November:

Books for International Goodwill has donated over 5.7 miillion books to libraries in the U.S. and overseas. We have 150,000 news and used books in our warehosue at any one time. We would be happy to provide books to libraries damaged by hurricane Sandy, but do not have a contact. We will cover the cost of transportation (and even cover the cost of a librariian to come to our site in Annapolis, MD to pick books, if tht is feasible). If anyone has a contact to help us get this off the ground, it would be appreciated.

Steve Frantzich---President Books for Interntional Goodwill 410 721 7344

As a general matter of good practices, it is best not to leave comments on stories over 45 days old as they might not be seen by most users. If anybody wishes to contact Mr. Frantzich in this matter his contact details are shown above.

Do We still Need Libraries?

Do We Still Need Libraries? is a series of opinion pieces from the New York times. See:
http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/12/27/do-we-still-need-libraries?hp

The Wrong War Over eBooks: Publishers Vs. Libraries

In the first of two parts about the new realities of publishing and public libraries, Forbes contributor David Vinjamuri discusses whether the right battle is being fought:

"The solution to the current pricing problem lies in understanding that the argument publishers and libraries are having is the wrong argument. It is based on the paradigm of the printed book and as such presents a series of intractable challenges for both publishers and libraries. By changing the model for pricing an eBook, both parties could find a clear and equitable resolution to the current impasse."

Actor Alec Baldwin Donates to Hometown Library

WPRI reports: One year after donating $10,000 to Central Falls' Adams Memorial Library in Rhode Island, Alec Baldwin sent another $5,000 check to the library in response to its year-end fundraising appeal.

“I am overwhelmed with gratitude,” said library board president Bruce Kaplan. “A year ago, Alec’s donation helped us keep the doors open. This year he's helping us expand hours of operation and community programming.”

Funding for the Adams Memorial Library was cut in the wake of Central Falls' bankruptcy. It was forced to close its doors for several months in 2011, until a group of volunteers raised enough money to reopen the library.

It Came From Akron

Apparently over 40 phone calls or so to your local public library that are harassing in nature may lead to charges being filed against you, according to WOIO news in Cleveland. Further details are available from The Akron Beacon-Journal.

UK lost more than 200 libraries in 2012

The fight to keep libraries open has dominated the headlines but the UK has quietly lost more than 200 branches over the past year, according to a detailed national survey.

The rate of library closures has increased, reveals the annual report from the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy: 146 branches closed between 2010 and 2011, with the number stepping up to 201 this year. The UK now has 4,265 libraries, compared with 4,612 two years ago, and the number of closures is likely to grow. Campaigners in Newcastle are currently fighting plans to close 10 out of the city's 18 libraries, with Billy Elliot playwright Lee Hall calling on the council to protect the city's heritage last month.

You're Not Really Going To Get Bedbugs From Your Library Books

The Bedbug Bunk: How the New York Times Used Fear and Misinformation to Spread Public Library Hysteria

But Reluctant Habits has talked with many of Saint Louis’s sources and has learned that the Times article is misleading. Bedbugs are not the major threat that Saint Louis suggests they are. In fact, some of the library directors who Saint Louis spoke with have never had a bedbug epidemic at all. They were merely taking preventive measures in the wake of recent media stories.

“The odds of you picking up a bedbug from a book in a library are so low that it’s not even worth talking about,” said Potter.

A Dark and Itchy Night

Sigh.

READING in bed, once considered a relatively safe pastime, is now seen by some as a riskier proposition according to this article in the New York Times.

Mark Lillis of Schendel Pest Services examines quarantined crates filled with library books in Wichita, Kansas.

That’s because bedbugs have discovered a new way to hitchhike in and out of beds: library books. It turns out that tiny bedbugs and their eggs can hide in the spines of hardcover books. The bugs crawl out at night to feed, find a new home in a headboard, and soon readers are enjoying not only plot twists but post-bite welts.

3rd annual KenKen logic puzzle tournament at the Chappaqua Public Library, New York

If you love solving KenKen logic puzzles (in the New York Times and elsewhere), the Chappaqua Public Library in Chappaqua, New York, will be hosting the 3rd annual KenKen logic puzzle tournament this weekend. Participation is free. To register for the tournament see http://www.kenken.com/contest An article about this puzzle tournament appeared on the PCWorld magazine web site in Feb, 2012. http://www.pcworld.com/article/249603/kenken_logic_puzzle_competition_at_the_public_library....

People travel from New Jersey and Connecticut to attend this competition -- as well as from surrounding towns in New York.

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