Public Libraries

Gunfire @ Your Library (Miami-Dade)

A simmering feud between two men led to gunfire, disorienting panic and calls to police of possible mass casualties at Miami-Dade’s main library yesterday.

In the end, only the gun-wielding man was shot — by a police officer who was off duty in uniform working at the downtown library. Dozens of patrons, some of whom witnessed the altercation, were led to safety. Do we still think open carry is a good idea?

Libraries Teach the Difference Between Real News & Fake News

It's happening all around the country. Librarians are teaching patrons and students how to detect "fake news".

In Seattle WA: From King5 News.

In Kenosha WI: From Kenosha WI News

At Fordham U, NY: Fordham University Libraries

In LaSalle, IL: La Salle Public Library

Do you know of other libraries informing their patrons how to spot "fake news"? Let us know in the comments.

SF Library Workers May Get Training to Stop Heroin Overdoses

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco public library staffers may soon be trained to administer medication to reverse heroin overdoses among the growing number of opioid users who are homeless.

The idea surfaced after an addict was found dead in one of the Civic Center library's restrooms in early February, the San Francisco Chronicle reports Sunday.

In a Feb. 28 letter to his staff that was obtained by the Chronicle, City Librarian Luis Herrera said that a decision about training librarians to treat overdose with naloxone will not be made until the issue is fully explored. He added that if done, it would be on "a strictly voluntary basis."

What do you think of this idea? Would you volunteer to give naloxone if necessary?

Good Luck to This Guy

California State Librarian, Greg Lucas, seeks money for CA libraries in a visit to Congress.

It’s going to be a tough fight: The president’s budget today proposed deep cuts into public libraries’ existing budgets, and it would eliminate perhaps a third of the state library’s budget.

In California, more than half the population — about 22 million — have library cards.

Congress is closely divided and partisanship is deeply entrenched, but a sound library system is not a partisan issue, argues Lucas. Story from Capitol Weekly.

St. Louis Public Library regains control after ransomware attack

From the article:

After working on the problem through the night, tech experts regained control of the server, Jen Hatton, PR and content manager, said Friday.

She said the staff would work to restore checkout capabilities, which are handled by an outside vendor. As of 7 p.m. Friday, checkout and computer services remained suspended.

The library did not pay the ransom demanded by hackers and reported the attack to the FBI, Hatton said.

More from The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Petition to Save the Rose Reading Room of the NYPL

The Committee to Save NYPL is petitioning the Landmarks Preservation Commission to officially designate the Rose Reading Room and other public spaces in the 42nd Street Library as interior landmarks. We need your help!

Please sign this petition and share it with your friends, family, and colleagues.

Preservationists had formally requested these spaces be designated years ago, but their demands were ignored by the city agency charged with protecting our cultural and architectural heritage. With the recent calendaring of the Ambassador Grill and the Waldorf Astoria interiors, we are optimistic that LPC will finally ensure that these cherished rooms will be preserved for posterity.

R. Michael Brown once remarked that the “story of our lives is written in interiors.” There can be no doubt that few New York City interiors have transformed as many lives as those in the 42nd Street Library. They deserve landmark protection.

I was Racially Profiled at the New York Public Library

At an event to honor Harry Belafone one guest stated that he was stopped and questioned upon his entrance to library, story from The New York Post.

A scene of homeless misery greets patrons trying to use Santa Ana's award-winning library

ut a visit to the downtown library has become, on many days, a walk through a gantlet of misery: Homeless men and women sleep in the lawn while others plead with visitors for change. Inside the building, signs warned people to avoid restrooms where some homeless use sinks and even toilet water to bathe themselves and wash their clothes. Some of Santa Ana’s down and out used the study carrels to look for jobs — others shot up drugs, with syringes found discarded in planters and even a box of toilet seat covers. Security guards carry syringe disposal kits on their tool belts.
From A scene of homeless misery greets patrons trying to use Santa Ana's award-winning library - LA Times

How NYC's First Puerto Rican Librarian Brought Spanish To The Shelves

But Perez y Martina — which tells the tale of a romance between a cockroach and a mouse — isn't just any children's story. When it was published in 1932, it was the first Spanish language book for children published by a mainstream U.S. press. And its author, Pura Belpré, was the first Puerto Rican librarian in New York's public library system at a time when the city's Puerto Rican population was swelling. Belpré could not find any books for kids in Spanish — so she wrote them herself. Back in 1921, Belpré was a college student at the University of Puerto Rico.

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