Public Libraries

The Secret Apartments of New York Libraries

From 6 square ft, a story about the secret apartments of New York libraries. The protagonists being the supers (superintendents) that maintain and live in the libraries.

"In the early to mid twentieth century, the majority of the city’s libraries had live-in superintendents. Like the superintendents who still live in many of the city’s residential buildings, these caretakers both worked and lived in the buildings for which they were responsible. This meant that for decades, behind the stacks, meals were cooked, baths and showers were taken, and bedtime stories were read. And yes, families living in the city’s libraries typically did have access to the stacks at night—an added bonus if they happened to need a new bedtime book after hours."

Would you like to have a little place in the back of your own library?

Smaller Replacement for Donnell Library (NYC) Opening

Via email from Save NYPL: After eight (!) years of delays, the replacement for Donnell Library will open next Monday (June 27) at 10am. If you are free that day, please join us as we remind NYPL officials that the opening of the new (significantly smaller) library is no cause for celebration. Beloved for its children’s literature and foreign language collection, the Donnell Library was one of NYPL’s most heavily used circulating branches. But in a trial run for the defeated Central Library Plan, Donnell was sold to private developers for a pittance in 2007 and shuttered the following year. The deal was hatched in secret, and no public review preceded the sale. The new replacement library is less than a third the size of Donnell and has been shoehorned into the basement of a luxury condominium-hotel, where rooms start at $850 per night. The special collections will not be returning. Unfortunately, we can’t bring back the old Donnell. But with your support, we can prevent further sales of our libraries. Let’s rally to remind library executives and elected officials that public libraries belong to all of us!

Escaping Poverty Through the Library

From Canada's Independent-Newfoundland,Labrador a piece explaining the importance of libraries to the poor and indigent.

Los Angeles Library Shop Reopens

From LAist, the shop at the Central Library, closed since last January has reopened and is a great place to buy everything a booklover wants. Check it out!

More than half Newfoundland & Labrador libraries closing in wake of budget cuts

The library board in Newfoundland and Labrador announced sweeping changes to its services Wednesday, adopting a regional library model which will see 54 branches close in the next two years. The board met Tuesday to discuss how best to deal with a $1-million loss in its annual budget, a cut made in the provincial budget. In a statement, the board said 41 libraries will remain open, and 85 per cent of residents in the province will still be within a 30 minute drive of a remaining branch.
From More than half province's libraries closing in wake of budget cuts - Newfoundland & Labrador - CBC News

Mass. circulation rates tell an interesting tale

Susan Neuman, a professor of education studies at the University of Michigan who has researched the use of libraries in poor versus middle-income areas around the country, said, “In low-income areas, the time people spend in the libraries is often much longer than in middle-income areas and it’s a lot different.” “This is where they do their job applications, where they do their gaming, and where they read and do all of their information-related activities. It’s where the kids do their homework,” Neuman said.
From Is your local library a bestseller? — Mass. circulation rates tell an interesting tale - The Boston Globe

Meet the man who is turning D.C. libraries into a national model

But Reyes-Gavilan’s ambitions go beyond bricks and mortar. He wants to put the D.C. Public Library at the forefront of American libraries, to be a model for the nation by embracing a “hacker” culture that treats library patrons not as passive consumers of information, but as creators. His mantra is “libraries are not their buildings,” but “engines of human capital.”
From Meet the man who is turning D.C. libraries into a national model - The Washington Post

In San Jose, Poor Find Doors to Library Closed Because Of Late Fines

Alexander is more careful than most.Half of the current cardholders at the Biblioteca branch owe money, and most — 65 percent — are barred from borrowing materials and using computers because they owe $10 or more. San Jose’s charges are exponentially higher than comparable cities like San Francisco, where there is no charge for late materials for users 17 and younger and a charge of 10 cents a day for adults. “Fifty cents a day for middle-class families is a slap on the wrist,” said Maria Arias Evans, the principal of Washington Elementary School in San Jose, which is behind the Biblioteca Latinoamericana. Given the choice between paying fines “and putting food on the table and a roof over the children’s head, it’s a no-brainer: It is better not to check out library books.”
From In San Jose, Poor Find Doors to Library Closed - The New York Times

Editorial: Embarrassing to Forget Black History Month

The Gilroy branch of the Santa Clara County Library (Calif.) apparently forgot about Black History Month until a user asked about it.

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