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Sublime Stitching's Sexy Librarians embroidery patterns

Sublime Stitching's Sexy Librarians embroidery patterns
Sexy Librarians is just one of several fantastic embroidery patterns made by Sublime Stitching and for sale in the Boing Boing Bazaar. There's also Meaty Treats, Vital Organs, and Lucha Libre. Check them all out here. And check out the rest of the Makers Market for more maker-made marvelousness.


Check Out This Website

You've gotta see this...a beautifully done promo for "Life List" by Olivia Gentile. Site design by Pentagram.

Calling All Print Supporters...Read the Printed Word

Read the Printed Word!
A fan of the printed word? Add their code to your library's site or blog to show your support for the printed word in all its forms: newspapers, magazines and, of course, books.

Here's some background on the project from one of the creators.

Read the Printed Word!


National Library of Ireland William Butler Yeats Exhibition

Enter exhibition here. Enjoy the elaborate virtual reality exhibition, and follow Yeats development as a poet, a playwright and writer of prose. The National Library of Ireland has the largest collection of Yeats manuscripts in the world, many contributed over the years by his widow and by his son.

10 Librarian Blogs To Read in 2010

10 Librarian Blogs To Read in 2010 I started the "10 Blogs To Read This Year" 4 years ago to help highlight people writing in the many different areas of librarianship. Those people who are doing some of the most interesting and original writing on the web. Each year we've attempted to gather a group of librarians whose writing helps increase our understanding of the profession and it's place in our rapidly changing world. Again this year we tried to choose 10 writers who cover very different aspects of our profession, 10 sites that inform, educate and maybe amuse. By following these blogs I think you'll find something new to read, and a place to gain better understanding of a part of librarianship that's outside of your normal area. We all have much to learn from each other, and these bloggers are working hard to share their knowledge and understanding with you. Read on below to see why each site made the list, and why there's an honorable mention this year. This year I also made an OPML File for your reader. Here's the list in alphabetical order:
  1. Academic Librarian (Feed)
  2. Awful Library Books (Feed)
  3. The Best Of PubLib (Feed)
  4. Disruptive Library Technology Jester (Feed)
  5. Everybody's Libraries (Feed)
  6. The Library History Buff (Feed)
  7. Library Garden (Feed)
  8. The Merry Librarian (Feed)
  9. The 'M' Word - Marketing Libraries (Feed)
  10. Walt at Random (Feed)
Honorable Mention: Agnostic, Maybe (Feed)

Search Engine for Creative Commons and Public Domain Images

ResearchBuzz Points The Way to a neat site called Sprixi. "Sprixi gathers images from quality sites around the web and brings them together. Currently we get images Flickr and OpenClipArt, as well as our own images. "

How to Make a Book of Pop-Up Dinosaurs (if you dare!)

How to make a pop-up book by Robert Sabuda, leading children's pop-up book artist and paper engineer, who works with Matthew Reinhart on this Encyclopedia Prehistorica Dinosaurs: The Definitive Pop-Up (not available on Kindle?)

Want to try your hand at it? It doesn't look easy.

Lending Materials of a Different Sort

About six months ago, I read about an organization called Kiva that makes microloans to groups and individuals in economically disadvantaged countries all over the world. These loans, ranging from several hundred dollars to several thousand, represent people trying to improve their business and lives. Microloans are a great way to provide capital to small businesses that are otherwise ignored by financial institutions. (Read about the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh; this Nobel Peace Prize winning organization started lending to the poor in Bangladesh.) Over time, the loans are repaid to your account; you can take the money out or you can re-loan it to other applicants. It is not without its risk. For myself, it’s a worthwhile calculated risk. At best I get paid back so I can make another loan; at worst, I tried and it didn’t work.

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True Stories from a Book Drop Near You

Oct. 25th blog post,

Book drops. It seems simple, doesn’t it? A name like “book drop” doesn’t leave much room for mystery…you’d think.

A recent poll of librarians has proven otherwise, however. Across the nation, patrons of public libraries have confused a book drop with trash receptacles, a donation box, urinals, chicken coops… The list goes on and on.

While we may never understand how or why this confusion occurs, we do know that the result of patron confusion–though sometimes disturbing–is frequently amusing. So, until the government provides libraries with several billion dollars to launch an education campaign on proper book drop use, we have taken it upon ourselves to provide you with this useful list of book drop dos and don’ts–all based on the true stories that have been sent in from around the world.

1. Situation: You work at a library in the city of Las Vegas, NV. As you approach the book drop, you hear the sound of squawking and scratching.

Don’t…Assume you’re crazy. You may be miles from the nearest farm, but there actually are chickens in your book drop…complete with food and water. Hey, it happens.

Do… Tell your coworkers to fire up the bar-be-que, baby!

2. Situation: Upon opening the book drop, you are pummeled by the stench of garbage. And on top of the rubbish heap in your book drop? A used maxi pad.

Don’t…Toss your cookies into the book drop. You’d only have to clean that up, too.

Lost in Translation--Crazy Reference Questions

The following is another story from The Merry Librarian. Once again, this true story is an example of patron expectations for a librarian’s abilities. As bizarre requests go, this one is definitely a strange need for information. And we’re just curious…why is it that when a patron needs something complicated and bizarre, they always want it within 24 hours? Just curious....

“Here’s a situation I ran into yesterday that I thought you might find amusing…it falls under the “librarians should know everything about everything” assumption that much of the general public seems to have. A man walked into our branch yesterday and asked me the following questions:

“If something were translated from English into Mayan hieroglyphics into Egyptian hieroglyphics, would someone from Iran who speaks Hebrew be able to understand it?”

Umm…I’m thinking not.

“Well, then, could you translate it for me so they could understand it?”

…Why yes, of course I happen to be fluent in ALL those languages. (I am a librarian, after all.)

“Well, do you have a book that translates Mayan hieroglyphics into Egyptian hieroglyphics into Hebrew?”

I’m thinking not…but I’ll check anyway just to appease you…Nope, just as I suspected. Nothing.

“Why don’t you have any books that do that?”

I don’t think there is a book anywhere that does that.

“Well, what can you do? I need it done tonight.”


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