School Libraries

Schools reviving a dead language

A CNN Story says As educators work to improve student performance in basic subjects such as reading, math, history and science, a few are finding that Latin, long thought stuffy and irrelevant, can help.
They say in 1895, about 44 percent of American students took Latin.

Tibi gratias ago.

Mexican Americans and Segregated Schooling

Ender pointed the way to South by Southwest: Mexican Americans and Segregated Schooling, 1900-195o, by Vicki L. Ruiz. The narrative that follows briefly delineates the institutional nature of segregation "for the cause of Americanization" as well as two significant legal challenges by Latino parents on behalf of their children.

"To this day I just love
going into libraries...there are two places that I can go in and get a
real warm, happy feeling; that is, the library and Bullock's in the
perfume and make-up department."

Net has boosted need for librarians

Lee passed along This Sacbee.com Story that says the Internet has made trained librarians more necessary than ever before. I\'m not sure what it has done for the untrained librarians.
They say credentialed library media teachers can teach students how to conduct efficient Internet searches, sift valid information from a sea of bogus Web pages, and most importantly, monitor the sites they\'re accessing while teaching them about the ethics involved in plagiarism and copyright infringement.
See Also:Just one in seven California schools has a credentialed library media teacher on campus working part time or more.

Improving Literacy Through School Libraries

Ender, Duke_of_URL writes: \"On Sept 27 2002, the Department of Education announced 94 grants (doc) to
improve literacy through school libraries. The LSL program is
designed to promote local strategies to improve student achievement by
improving library services and resources, including advanced school
library media centers and professionally certified school library
media specialists\"

Cleaning Out the Stacks: Public School Libraries Slowly Update Collections

New, stricter state standards for school libraries in Missouri means massive weeding of outdated material. \"Many Missouri public school libraries still had books saying: “Someday, man will go to the moon...\" Those outdated books have been yanked off the shelves along with thousands of others deemed unacceptable by toughened state standards. But once they were off, many schools scrambled for funds to replace them and add books needed to meet new state library guidelines that emphasize quality and timeliness over quantity. Read More.

Schools adjust to no librarians

Elementary schools in Springfield, Illinois, USA -- the state capital where Abe Lincoln rests -- eliminated all librarian and assistant positions as part of big-time budget cuts. The State Journal-Register, in a hefty article, reports on the way each school is dealing with the situation. Or not.

Oh, the one person who knew how to operate the library automation system was riffed, too.

Schools Adapt Old Lesson: Share and Share Alike

An Interesting NYTimes Story sent in by always alert Jen Young on ho more schools, particularly in New York City, are sharing buildings, either with other schools or with noneducational enterprises. Some schools are sharing common spaces like the library and gymnasium.

Thin Line Splits Cheating, Smarts

Wired Says that Google Answers may be helping cheaters prosper. They have several cases that show students often ignore the policy encouraging students to use the service as a study aid rather than a substitution for original work.

One student in Quebec, dismayed by a response that offered only background research for a paper on religion, pleads, \"Make it into an essay, not just links and quotes. I need this asap PLEASE!!! 2500 words is the minimum.\"

Net savvy students to teachers: You just don\'t get it!

The Christian Science Monitor\'s Tom Reagan Says according to \"The Digital
Disconnect,\" a new report from the Pew
Internet and American Life Project
78 percent of middle and high school
students use the Internet (probably a
conservative figure), and that 94 percent of
that number had used the Internet as a
major research source for a recent major school project. The new
report says the \"most Internet-savvy among them complain that their
teachers don\'t use the Internet in class or create assignments that
exploit great Web material.\"

Here\'s The Survey.[Again]

School libraries computerised \'fingerprinting\' system criticised

JB Bryant QuickSubmitted This Follow Up on that \'fingerprinting\' system. Privacy groups and parents have criticised a new computerised library system for schools that involves children apparently being fingerprinted.

The watchdog Privacy International has expressed concerns about the system which uses the data to bring up a child\'s personal details.

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