School Libraries

Separation of School and State

This is a very interesting commentary in the Jewish World Review. Wendy McElroy makes very good points about the media and how it regards any other education BUT public as corrupt. Note the reference further down the page to the Oct. 14 CBS News two-part report entitled "A Dark Side to Homeschooling." She also includes interesting statistics.
Separation of School and State

Administrators now understand - The Internet cannot replace books

moyergirl writes "Follow this link to a positive article on school libraries. We all know that the web will not replace all print materials. Read how one school library in TX is using the expertise of their librarians to further student growth."

Well-stocked, staffed school libraries boost FCAT scores, UCF research shows

An Anonymous Patron writes to share this article

Students at schools with well-staffed libraries that circulate the most books and have the most computers outperform their peers on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, according to research at the University of Central Florida.
FCAT scores, the state's primary measure of student achievement, were 20 percent higher in 2000-01 in reading at high schools that employed at least one full-time professional librarian and the equivalent of one other full-time library employee, UCF education professor Donna Baumbach concluded in her "Making the Grade" report. FCAT scores also were highest at elementary and middle schools with well-staffed libraries.

Hernando: Hernando schools won't ban book

Bob Cox writes, From the St. Petersburg (Flordia) Times,

"The Judy Blume novel Deenie will remain in Hernando County elementary schools, despite recommendations from a review committee and the superintendent to remove it.

But to get the 31-year-old book, students will have to bring a note from home.

"I can't see denying its availability if some parents decide it's okay for their child to read," School Board vice chairman Jim Malcolm said. "Some people are offended by the content. Others aren't. I will defer to individual parent choice for their child."

Pupils turn librarians

An Anonymous Patron refers us to this story about a library in South London letting YA's select some of the new books for the library.

Libraries may restrict chatroom access

ic Wales reports that some libraries in South Wales may ban children from using free Intenet access to access Chatrooms in the hopes of protecting "children against the downside of the Internet."

Adult magazine part of school fundraiser

Bob Cox writes to share this story about a "shocking" magazine discovered in a school fund-raising sale.

"it is natural to assume that magazines purchased through a school fundraising drive would be suitable for children, especially since children are the ones doing the buying and selling. So you can imagine a Grandville mom's surprise when her daughter was able to order a magazine full of sexual content.

Asimov's Science Fiction is the magazine in question, and from the outside cover, doesn't look like an 'adults-only' publication. But open it up and you will find it is."

Or, is it?

No Librarians Left Behind: Preparing for Next-Generation Libraries

Stephen Abram presents an informative essay (in 2 parts) on trends that information professionals in the school library sector need to be looking out for. Part 1 covers trends in searching and web technology, whilst part 2 deals with the trend towards e-learning.

'Weird' stories OK in context

With the exception of a story about an anorexic dog, reading lessons several families had called "weird" and inappropriate for children will remain in the four elementary schools here.

The Beatrice Public Schools Board of Education agreed unanimously Monday that most of the stories would stay, taking the recommendation of a committee formed to investigate the books.

Parents and a teacher spoke against the decision at a board meeting.

Third-grade teacher Michele Blum said she didn't want her students reading stories in which characters made fun of people with disabilities.
Full Story.

Former Board Member Thinks Farting Dog Story Stinks

A former school board member from the West Salem (WI) School District has gotten the attention of the school board president with his concerns about a book at the elementary school library. Walter the Farting Dog, is a popular children's story book about a pooting pooch rescued from a dog pound, and whose problem...........(spoiler alert!) thwarts some burglars. The complainant doesn't feel like it's an appropriate book for his grandson, who attends the school. A special meeting, which will bypass the district's reconsideration of materials procedure, has been called to discuss the removal of the book. Speaking in defense of the book, publisher Richard Grossinger of North Atlantic Books/Frog Ltd called the book a fable that teaches that having undesireable traits doesn’t mean that people (or dogs) "can’t be successful or contribute to society.�
More here from American Libraries Online.

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