Collection Development

The Video Game Librarian, Six Months Later

the_anarchivist writes: "John Scalzo, a librarian who decided to add PlayStation 2 games to his public library's collection, reports back with the success his idea has found, including a list of the most popular titles in his library. Read the complete article at Gaming Target."

Free Korans Available, says USA Today

Kelly writes "Get a free copy of one of the better translations of the Koran for your library (web url to order it online is explorethequran.orgUSAToday, which is where I saw this mentioned says, "Americans curious to crack the mysteries of Islam are about to delve by the thousands into the challenging text that inspires Arabic calls to prayer, worldwide pilgrimage and jihad: the book known to Muslims as The Holy Koran. Baraa Jaghlit packages up Korans for shipping in Beltsville, Md.
Almost 4,000 people have jumped at an offer from the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) to send a free copy of Abdullah Yusuf Ali's translation of the Koran (also spelled Qur'an) to whoever wants one. Publisher Amana Publications stands ready to ship as many as 25,000 starting this week..." For more information, go to

usatoday.com"

Amazon RSS Feeds of Books and Everything!

Cliff Urr writes "Wow - this is SO cool! Custom make RRS feeds - to be read in your RSS reader - of new items in Amazon's catalog!! According to the wonderful "Lifehacker" web site, "Developer DeWitt Clinton has put together a search of Amazon’s product base with results available in an RSS feed, so you can keep up with item prices and availability right in your newsreader." Check it out here:

http://www.unto.net/aws/"

Cookbook Heaven Opening in Ann Arbor

On May 14, the William L. Clements Library on the University of Michigan campus at Ann Arbor will open a special collection--
The Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive containing thousands of items from the 16th to 20th centuries - books, ephemera, menus, magazines, graphics, maps, manuscripts, diaries, letters, catalogues, advertisements, and reference works from the Renaissance through to the last century, all having to do with food and its preparation.

Only half the books in the new Longone Center for American Culinary Research are cookbooks, the other half are travel books, food encyclopedias and dictionaries, biographies, diet books and histories of inns, restaurants, taverns, sugar, grapes, bananas, winemaking, cooking equipment - anything touching upon food and drink. New York Times and the archive website provide additional information,Update: 05/05 20:14 EST by B:corrected link

earning pop culture DVDs for your library

deborah writes " Whedonverse is running a raffle to raise money to donate Buffy and Angel DVDs to libraries. "The Whedonverse Multimedia Project is a fan-based organization whose mission is to bring Joss Whedon's Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel the Series, and Firefly to public libraries and charitable groups that have requested help in adding them to their collection." Hey, my home library is on the short list. Cool."

The Video Game Librarian

John Scalzo worked hard to assemble a collection of video games for an unnamed library and wrote a fantastic article for Gaming Target about the experience. The ground rules were simple: no mature games like Grand Theft Auto and no Simpsons games (d'oh!). Anything else available from the library's approved vendor was, you should pardon the expression, fair game. See what he picked and why in the full article. (Via Kotaku)

Lesbian and Gay Literature Newsletter

There's a new website with information on book choices in the gay and lesbian genres, "Books To Watch Out For", a terrific resource for librarians in collection development.

After twenty years of publishing a popular newsletter 'Feminist Bookstore News', author and bookseller Carol Seajay has renewed her efforts to spread the word to the public about interesting reads from smaller and independent publishers on gay themes...here's a profile of the project from Poets and Writers .

A Quick Guide To the Academy Awards For Librarians

William Lamb writes "Last night the 77th Annual Academy Awards gave out the film industry's most coveted prizes in 21 different feature film categories. These categories range from Special Effects to Acting and Writing. Each year librarians check to see which award winners they own, which are available that they do not own and when other award winners will be released on DVD.

To make that task easier, we've compiled an easy-to-use list of all 12 award winning films in feature film categories. We have listed the films alphabetically by title, included the award(s) won by each film and the best information currently available for the DVD release of each film.

View the list"

A Quick Guide To the Grammy Awards For Librarians

William Lamb writes "Last night the 47th Annual Grammy Awards gave out the music industry's most coveted prizes in 105 different categories. These categories range from Pop Vocals to Polka. Each year librarians comb the awards lists to check their own collection for award winners that library patrons will be seeking. To make that task easier, we've compiled an easy-to-use list of all 68 award winning albums in musical, non-classical categories. However, instead of the traditional by-category list, we have placed them in a simple alphabetical-by-artist list with the award(s) won following the artist/title information."

Patron says "thought police" keep books from libraries

Daniel writes "In an article called Thought Police at the Library, Lew Rockwell columnist Gail Jarvis speculates why his local library did not accept his purchase recommendations:

"We know how political correctness has "cleansed" various organizations, but the damage it has done to public libraries has largely escaped notice. To illustrate how PC has imposed its censoring dictates on these essential facilities, I will use the Beaufort County Public Library in Beaufort, South Carolina. No doubt, it is well representative of other public libraries."

If you stick with the article, you'll find some possibly valid criticisms of how libraries are wedded to mainstream review tools to evaluate possible purchases. I have not read the books in question."

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