Linux

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #262

UbuCon Ohio 2013 Announcement

A brief announcement for the UbuCon event being organized by Ubuntu Ohio at Ohio Linux Fest 2013 where librarians curious about Linux and/or Ubuntu are welcome.

Download here (MP3) (ogg)

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #246

This week's episode brings a brief essay, retransmission of an excerpt of a program from US government external broadcaster Voice of America concerning the cyber-snooping situation, and a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Matériel purchasing needs of the Air Staff can be found from time to time via Amazon where such can be purchased and sent to them.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #244

This week's program brings the annual warnings about hurricane season followed by Profile America mentioning an interesting new data release the Census Bureau is making and then a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Operational support items for the Air Staff can be purchased and sent to the production team via this Amazon wishlist.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #242

And we're back. The first episode after the production suspension has a series of brief essays followed by a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Torrent), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

The day TuxPaint became contagious in my library

In a short span of time, the free TuxPaint drawing program became wildly popular in our public library's computer center. I was surprised at how much older students enjoyed using the program.

http://opensource.com/education/12/5/day-tuxpaint-became-contagious

Topic: 

Promo for LISTen's Shortwave Debut

"In protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act proposal, LISTen will be making its debut on shortwave radio. On New Year's Eve, we'll be on WBCQ The Planet on 5.110 MHz at 6 PM Eastern/11 PM Coordinated Universal Time.

Demographic Rambling

Four years of podcasting with LISNews.org has been interesting. The statistics make things even more interesting. Sadly, I do not have a complete set of data points. Those that I do have worry me.

Location is key. When it comes to covering the Library & Information Science world, our main focus is not geography but instead topical matters. Based upon what data I can derive from FeedBurner's limited statistics, we may cover the right topical matters but hit all the wrong areas of geographical coverage.

From the limited geographical data I have, the bulk of listeners to LISTen: An LISNews.org Program happen to be located in places like the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Canada. US listenership actually comes in a bit lower than would be expected. This may also reflect regional preferences in how you subscribe to podcast content since the FeedBurner link is but one way to subscribe. We simply lack data for some means of subscribing to the podcast.

What can I do with having primarily a foreign audience while the content is primarily produced with a domestic US focus? Some changes in content focus may be necessary perhaps. The big problem with that is that we have virtually no budget and are tethered to the south shores of Lake Erie in a township called Ashtabula. We really do not have the assets in place to cover stories in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Canada. Expansion of assets would otherwise be necessary and we do not have a way to do so quite just yet.

The fifth year of the program is now underway. I want to make changes this year. A big one would be to secure funding for shortwave distribution. With the lessons of this year in terms of how fragile the Internet is, having a backup is important. Considering how much of the listenership is located outside North America, such would be a viable backup that would also skirt around national blacklists and firewalls.

Getting the resources to cover foreign stories is an even harder thing than simply buying blocks of airtime with money we don't have. Foreign collaborators would be necessary. Without any way to compensate them it is kinda hard to recruit such people. Indigenous correspondents would allow for better coverage anyhow compared to trying to secure a travel budget and visa clearances for international travel. We could previously handle this sort of thing through judicious use of Skype but with as unreliable as Time Warner Cable has been locally we cannot go with that option.

These speed results help illuminate what we are paying USD$39.95 to get:



The easy part is knowing what you want to do. The hard part is finding the resources to bring such to fruition. The search for resources is the big challenge for year five, it seems.

Creative Commons License
Demographic Rambling by Stephen Michael Kellat is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work at erielookingproductions.info.

IT Security For Libraries First In A Series

IT Security In Libraries
8. Social Media Security
7. Practical IT Security
6. Integrating IT Security In Your Library
5. 20 Common Security Myths
4. How To Stay Safe Online
3. Passwords
2. Privacy
1. IT Security Foundations

Today's post is long on theory. I'll argue that most any library can be a target, and present some ideas on how to make things more secure in your library.
My first post will cover privacy, because I think it's closely related to security, and it's something we as librarians take seriously. Then I'll cover a bunch of ways to stay safe online, how to secure your browser, PC and other things you and your patrons use every day. I'll also cover some common security myths. Then we'll talk passwords: everything has a password now, and I want to make sure we all understand what it takes to make your password as secure as possible. Then we'll talk network security for a bit, followed by hardware and PC security. Then I'll focus on security issues that you'll find in your library. And last, but not least, some things I think you'll find interesting that sysadmins do with servers to make things safer for you, and that you'll never see as an end user.

One way to begin thinking about security for your library is by asking yourself few questions:

What do you have to lose?
What does your library & patrons have to lose?
What are the bad guys after?

Coming up with even a few quick answers to these questions can be helpful, I think, because it's important to remember we all have something to lose, and that we all have a part to play in keeping ourselves and our libraries safe.

It's also important to know that, ultimately, there is no such thing as a secure computer. Nothing we do can make things 100% safe. We can just make things safer than they were before. All of the security work we do is about reducing risk. It's about knowing what we're up against. We want to reduce the possible frequency of loss (by securing things as much as possible, given our resources) AND we want to reduce the potential magnitude of loss (by limiting what can be lost as much as possible).

To help set the stage for success we should keep in mind 2 things. "Any lock can be picked", and people are the weakest link in security chain. First, people:

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