Author's Guild Claims Kindle 2 Copyright Infringement

The Kindle 2 has a feature which allows the book to be read out loud. And wow, does this have the Author's Guild up in a tizzy.

"They don't have the right to read a book out loud," said Paul Aiken, executive director of the Authors Guild. "That's an audio right, which is derivative under copyright law."

Amazon is moving forward with the rather logical opinion that there's no way a person would confuse the computerized text to speech voice with an audiobook.

So all of you youth librarian types doing story time? STOP IT. You're violating copyright and you're probably doing it more ways than one since you're not only reading Chicka Chicka Boom Boom out loud, but you're putting on a public performance.

Boing Boing Gadgets has the run down. More on this story from the Wall Street Journal.

Suspect in crash that killed two Old Greenwich librarians arrested again

A driver whose license was suspended after a fatal hit-and-run collision with a cab headed to the Denver airport was spotted driving again.

Full story here.


A Fond Farewell To Favorite Cultural Spots In Milwaukee

Arnie Birren writes in the UWMLeader :

"Just imagine, one day we'll tell our kids about books. The way they smelled when first purchased, the graceful aging of the yellowed volumes that lined the shelves of resale stores and the satisfaction of turning that final page.

Start saying goodbye to the paperback. Say farewell to off-tune punk ballads bleeding through the low-ceilinged basements of Riverwest. Kiss your art goodbye Milwaukee. It's leaving you behind.

March 31 will mark the final day of operation for Harry W. Schwartz Bookshops, a Milwaukee staple since 1927. Not only a bookshop, Schwartz also serves as a venue for book and poetry readings. It connects the loose network of local readers and writers to nationally touring authors. It has been a place to talk about books."

Woman held in DUI fatal also charged in tiger case

A woman suspected in a hit and run Wednesday that killed two Connecticut librarians on Peña Boulevard is facing a jury trial in March on a charge of illegal possession of a Bengal tiger cub.

Full story here.


One of the Last Of the Few Sunday Newspaper Book Sections Will Soon Be Gone

The Washington Post reported today that it plans to close its stand-alone magazine Book World as of mid-February.

In dropping one of the few remaining stand-alone book sections in American newspapers, Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli said that the coverage will be shifted to the Style section and a revamped Outlook section. Shea said that The Post would publish about three-quarters of the roughly 900 reviews it has carried each year. The change will take effect Feb. 22.

The CIA, Rapist, and Self Publishing

Yesterday there was a story on LISNEWS called Self-Publishers Flourish as Writers Pay the Tab that opens with this line: "The point may soon come when there are more people who want to write books than there are people who want to read them."

Here is a unique tie together of two stories. You may have seen on the news this breaking story: Former CIA station chief accused of rape. Andrew Warren, the CIA station chief in question, is the author of a self published book called The People of the Veil

The publisher (using that term loosely) is Publish America. Here is the page at Publish America for the book. Looks like the book was the September 2002 book of the month at Publish America.

Denver Library Baby Meets the Press

Mom (Dominique Trevino, 18) and one-day- old baby (Sariah Unique) are doing well.

Library staff pitched in to buy a bag full of children's books for Sariah, which Thomas Scott, director of security and safety, presented to Trevino at Wednesday's news conference.

She also got an earth-friendly library tote bag with two unactivated library cards inside - one for mom, who said she's not a big reader, and one for baby.

"We look forward to having her as a customer," Scott told Trevino.

More on this story (and a picture) from The Rocky Mountain News.

John Updike Dead at Age 76

John Updike, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, prolific man of letters and erudite chronicler of sex, divorce and other adventures in the postwar prime of the American empire, died Tuesday at age 76.

Updike, a resident of Beverly Farms, Mass., died of lung cancer, according to a statement from his publisher, Alfred A. Knopf.


PW Lays Off Top Brass

Sara Nelson, the editor in chief of Publishers Weekly, the main trade magazine for the book industry, has been laid off in a restructuring by the publication’s parent company, Reed Business Information.

According to a statement from Reed, which operates a broad range of trade publications, the layoffs affect about 7 percent of the staff (including executive editor Daisy Maryles, bookselling editor Kevin Howell, children's reviews editor Elizabeth Devereaux and director of business development Rachel Dicker ...Shelf-Awareness) .

As a result of the restructuring, Brian Kenney, editor in chief of School Library Journal, will now be editorial director of three magazines: Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal and Library Journal. NYTimes.

Neil Gaiman wins Newbery.

Comic book geeks and nerds rejoice.

Of 'The Graveyard Book,' Gaiman says, "It has a protagonist who is about eighteen months old in the first chapter, four in the second chapter, six in the third, and so on, until, by chapter eight, he is all of sixteen years old. There's no sex in it and no swearing. There is some really scary stuff in there, and a few of the people (all adults) who have read it have written to tell me they cried in the last chapter."

Cool. More here.



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