News

Change by the Books

Peter Poe, staff writer for the Washington Post has written this favorable article about the addition of other language books and online catalogs into libraries collections.
\"Not long after she moved here from Taiwan, Sherry Yu found something shocking in an American library. It was a library card application form written entirely in Chinese.
\"I came here to see what an American library looks like and I\'m leaving with an American library card,\" Yu, 21, said in Chinese, smiling as she held up a key chain with a library tag on it. \"Can you believe that?\" -- Read More

Caution!! Library Vote Tomorrow

Alabama Live has this article about a library director that will go to any means to have library users vote for the budget.

\"The life of the Bessemer Public Library is at stake Tuesday.

At least that\'s the message Carol Castine, the library\'s director, wants to get across.

To do that, Ms. Castine had the library draped in yellow caution tape, as if it were a homicide scene.

\"I just want to call attention to the library with the vote coming up,\" she said.\" -- Read More

Library waives fines on overdue books

This article appeared in the Montreal Gazette.

\"When it comes to excuses for not returning a library book on time, Vesna Dell\'Olio has heard them all.

The librarian has seen adults shuffle up to her counter with their heads down and their faces flushed, mumbling something about ex-husbands and ex-wives having made off with the book. Or people admitting that they didn\'t want to return their late books because they thought the fine would be too hefty.\" -- Read More

SHelf Esteem

The
Washington Post
Has a fanatasticArticle on the Library
of Congress. Everything you wanted to know, and more.

\" Another truth America\'s Founding Fathers
held to be self-evident was that ignorance is the enemy
of democracy. In December 1800, before our young
government had finished moving to its new capital at
Washington, the good ship American left London
bearing 740 books bound for what was to become our
national library. -- Read More

Tetris Maximus at Brown Library

Bonnie Good Buzzell Writes:

In this morning\'s Providence Journal, a story about a giant Tetris game
display on the 14 story Sciences Library at Brown. The Story is at Projo.com.

\"The Brown students\' version uses a desktop computer to control 10,000 Christmas lights strung in the windows of the 194-foot high library building, one of the tallest buildings on the city\'s East Side. The lights span windows on 11 floors, illuminating each window separately. (Only 10 of the 11 floors are working). The grid replicates a crude but effective 10-by-10 pixel screen, visible from outside the building.\" -- Read More

Drew Carey to Compete for $1 Million for Ohio Libraries

I can\'t pass up the opportunity to post a story that Involves Who Wants to Be a Millionare? and Drew Carey!

Carey, who launched his career in 1986 at the Cleveland Comedy Club, has chosen Ohio libraries to receive proceeds from his celebrity appearance on ABC\'s popular television show, Who Wants to be a Millionaire.

Carey will appear on the Millionaire program on May 2 and 3 in a special game show featuring celebrities who will be playing for their favorite charities and causes. Carey has chosen Ohio libraries as recipient of his winnings during \"Celebrity Week\" on the program.

Is he smart enough to win a Million? -- Read More

Online library project Galileo needs support

The Atlanta Journal Constitution has this Report on Galileo, Georgia\'s free online library.

\"
Georgia was one of the first states in the United States to start building a big online library that everybody in the state with a computer --- from professors to schoolchildren --- could use for free. Gov. Zell Miller liked the idea of making the new world of Internet services available to every student --- as in public education --- and Gov. Roy Barnes also has supported the project, which has cost $30 million so far.

But the project --- called Galileo; now most states have a version --- keeps facing the obstacles of too little money and attention. -- Read More

Secretary bequeaths $350,000 to library

Read this Story from the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Stung by the Great Depression, Helen M. Brown knew the
value of a dollar and appreciated those who helped make
her money work.

The tiny, tight-fisted West Sider spent hours at a time in
the Cleveland Public Library studying the stock market. It
was time well spent, for Brown and the library - her
charitable trust has bequeathed $350,000 to the library
system and thousands more to local institutions that
touched her life.

Boy Pinned and arrested in Library after fracas

HeraldNet in Washingston had this brief story.

\"A tough-talking 14-year-old boy got more than he bargained for after he allegedly waved a knife at a 46-year-old man outside the downtown Everett Library about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday.

According to witness statements, the man accidentally bumped the boy on the sidewalk outside the library. The man excused himself. The boy allegedly said, \"Darn right, you\'d better excuse yourself, old man,\" said Everett police Lt. Greg Lineberry. -- Read More

Meeting Over Library Hours Tense

Read this Story from the Omaha (NE) Wold-Herald.

A City Hall meeting over the prospect of extending library hours grew contentious Monday afternoon, and one Omaha City Council member walked out in anger.

The meeting between Mayor Hal Daub, Councilman Marc Kraft and others was supposed to address increasing tension over when extended library hours, which had been budgeted for by the council, would be implemented.

\"The meeting did not go well with the mayor,\" Kraft said. \"I ended up walking out of it after having been insulted.\"

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