News

Schulz to receive Congressional Gold Medal

Everyone\'s favorite comic strip is getting an medal. Here is an Article just telling everyone that Charles Schulz will get the medal he always wanted.

\"President Bill Clinton signed a bill Tuesday giving the creator of the \"Peanuts\" comic strip the Congressional Gold Medal, the country\'s highest civilian honor and the one thing that Schulz -- a World War II veteran -- had desired.\"  -- Read More

Judge OKs smaller board for library

The Post-gazette has a follow up Story on that trouble at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library.

\"Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Walter R. Little granted a motion reducing the size of the board of trustees of the Andrew Carnegie Free Library from 17 to 12 members and eliminating the position of lifetime trustee.\" -- Read More

Who lynched Leo Frank?

RHadden sent in this strong story:

According to
the headlines of the Wall Street Journal,
Stephen
Goldfarb, a reference librarian in an Atlanta public
library, has posted a
site that names, perhaps, some of the residents of
Cobb County who were
involved in a 1915 lynching of Leo Frank. See his web
site at: leofranklynchers.c
om
.
It is a courageous stand, since many of the names
are well known in
today\'s Marietta community, and their descendents are
uneasy at this
spotlight on their county\'s past.
For news information about this historic incident in
Georgia, see the
Cobb Online news at: cobbo
nline.com
.
The Wall Street Journal requires an account to see
their article
online. The printed news story is by Carrick
Mollenkamp, \"An Internet
Posting Raises the Ghosts of a Notorious Crime: A
Librarian Names Names in
the Leo Frank Murder; The List in a Family Bible.\"
Friday, June 9, 2000,
page A1 and A12. -- Read More

Fighting with Father

The Pittsburg
Post Gazette
has a Story on the Andrew Carnegie
Free Library in Carnegie. Andrew made it clear he
wanted the library run a certain way, and now they want
to change that.

\"\"If he would have left us some
money to do it, we would have followed his rules,\" said
Carnegie Mayor Bob Heinrich, an ex-officio member of
the library board. -- Read More

Data Haven Island

My son recently convinced me to read Neal Stephenson\'s \'Cryptonomicon,\' a great read. In the book, some of the main characters try to set up a \'data haven\', a secure location that hosts internet services and is under no government imposed regulations.

He added that it turns out that the people at HavenCo (havenco.com) are setting up a data haven of their own, on the Island Nation of Sealand (A WWII British military installation 6 miles off the coast of England). You can read about the data haven at the first link, and you can read the unbelievable story of Sealand at the second link. -- Read More

Kosovo\'s Libraries Cleansed Of Albanian Books

Radio Free Europe has this sad article about the fate of Albanian language books in Kosovo\'s libraries.
\"Kosovo\'s libraries lost almost half their books over the last decade to ethnic cleansing. RFE/RL correspondent Jolyon Naegele reports that a new study says many of the libraries were purged of Albanian-language books even before hostilities erupted in 1998.\" -- Read More

Library An Amazing Deal.

You never know where you\'ll find a good story.
Steven Bell found one on Portablelife.com.
This story isn\'t exactly about libraries, but it does give a nice vote of confidence to libraries, and librarians. The author seems almost suprised that a library would have something so useful!

\"I\'ve saved the best for last: The public libraries in virtually every city and in many towns now offer internet access via desktop systems available to the public for free. Usually, you don\'t even need a library card, although the librarian may hold your driver\'s license hostage while you use the system for the allotted time.\" -- Read More

Derek de Solla Price Article

Lee
Hadden
writes:

An article about Derek de Solla Price
is in the May 18,
2000 issue of Nature. Dr. Price is the
ex-physicist who spoke about
the compounding effects of scientific publishing over
time, and first said
the famous and frequently un- attributed comment that
\"80 or 90 per cent of
the scientists who have ever lived are alive today\"
He also talked about and documented the
doubling of
scientific knowledge every ten or fifteen years or so
since the year 1700. -- Read More

City - University To Share New Library

SFGate.com has a cool Report on a new library in San Jose. The new library, a partnership between the city and San Jose State University, will be the first in the United States to combine the collections of a major city and university, opening all of the materials to the public.

``I am just exhilarated by the innovation and the planning process,\'\' said State Librarian Kevin Starr. ``They are linking the very first of the state universities to the wonderfully reassembled urban core of San Jose. They are showing the rest of the state how to do it.\'\' -- Read More

Death of a libary Cat

Here is a sad
story
from Michigan Live
on the tragic death of a beloved Libary
Cat.

\"Residents of the rural Michigen
community are mourning Deuce\'s loss after the cat
was mauled to death by two dogs Friday while it was
resting on the building\'s steps.\"

Be sure to
check out The
Web Site
of the departed cat. -- Read More

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