News

The Al Capone of Cartography

An unrealted (or is it?) stolen map Story from ABC. They talk
about a
just-published book about the notorious map thief,
Gilbert Bland. The
book \"The Island of Lost Maps,\" by Miles Harvey
states some reasons that Bland was able to get
away with what he did, and some of the reasons
involved for his actions. They also talk about the
librarians at the various institutions he
plundered, as well as police and university officials.

\"The allure of antique maps is even stronger,
not just for their art and craft — renderings of far-off
lands, decorated by wind-blowing gods, sea monsters,
naked Amazons or other imaginary attractions — but for
the possibilities that lie beyond their limited or
guessed-at boundaries.\"

The Internet Archive

Bob Cox sen this in:Consider the plight of a
traditional librarian trying to
deal with the
Internet. Providing organized access to something as
volatile, dynamic, and
disorganized as the Internet is truly what they call in
business \'an
opportunity\'. Founded in 1996 as a public nonprofit and
located in the
Presidio of San Francisco, the Internet Archive is
tackling that
\'opportunity\' by taking snapshots of Internet sites at
various time
periods, in essence preserving the place as it was, and
making the
resulting archive available for scholars and
researchers. To gain
access to it, you must register and describe either a
project that requires
you to get your grubby virtual paws on the material or a
plan to deposit
material. As of March 2000, the Archive had 1billion
Web pages, 50,000 FTP
sites, and 16 million Usenet postings amounting to
well over 14 terabytes
of data. The site describes the challenges of
preserving digital
materials, how the snapshots (really Web crawls) are
taken, the limitations
to such automated processes, what plans for the future
are, and just why
digital libraries are important:
Archive.org


From: http://www.netsurf.com/nse/nse.02.08.html#SS4

B Buzz Highlights -- Paper Books, Market Future

Ready for the weekend? Before you shut down the computer check out the Studio B
Buzz
highlights. A study predicts a strong book
publishing future but a survey shows that Internet users
prefer the paper kind.... -- Read More

New E-Books Announced by RCA

There\'s a new e-book coming to town, and it\'s brought to you by RCA... -- Read More

Studio B Highlights

Studio B\'s been getting a facelift! Go take a look. Sorry about the slight vanishing act, but I\'m back with the
Studio B Buzz Highlights. -- Read More

Gutenberg is the \"Man of the Millennium\"

Lee Hadden writes:

An article in the Wall Street
Journal, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2000, page
A24, talks about the celebration of Johannes Gutenberg
as the \"Man of the
Millennium\" in Mainz, and gives a brief account of his
career. See the site
(it also has an English translation) at: gutenberg.de -- Read More

Britain\'s Brain Drain

Lee Hadden writes :

In a letter to Nature (Vol 407, 7 Sept 2000, page 13) Alice Sharp
Pierson and Peter Cotgreave of the Save British Science Society, have used
citation analysis of the publications of scientists who have received
degrees in Britain in 1988, to indicate that the brain drain of British
science is a real occurrence. Recently, the British government has
announced substantial new investment in the British science base as a means
to stop the brain drain of British scientists and engineers. The
investigators, \"Using bibliographic data, we report here a statistically
significant difference between the quality of scientists who trained in the
United Kingdom but are now in the United States, and those who stayed in
the United Kingdom.\" -- Read More

Feds Elated With E-Rate

Wired has a Story on 2 new reports that say many good things about the E-Rate here in the US. : E-Rate and the Digital Divide: A Preliminary Analysis From the Integrated Studies of Educational Technology, conducted by the Urban Institute. The report found that e-rate funding is accomplishing what it was established to do, namely improving internal connections in the nation\'s poorer schools and getting them connected to the Internet.


\"The e-rate is helping to eliminate the digital divide and raise standards of learning in virtually every school and classroom,\" Riley said at the Conference on Educational Technology. \"The report clearly shows that we\'re moving in the right direction.\"



A second study released Monday from the National Center for Education Statistics, Teachers\' Tools for the 21st Century: A Report on Teachers\' Use of Technology showed that 99 percent of teachers have access to computers or the Internet at school, but not all of them have the skills to use it effectively.

National Filtering Week?!

We might as well declare it that as there have been so many filtering stories this week. Here is another from Michigan Live about a library that spent $85,000 for a filtering system (plus $17,000 per year in support costs). Granted, they \"had\" to do something, but do you know how many books $85,000 could buy?\"The Kent District Library Board on Tuesday decided to fund an Internet filter system they say is cost-effective and also complies with requirements of a new state law to shield minors from offensive materials.\" -- Read More

PictureAustralia

shenders@nla.gov.au writes \"PictureAustralia was launched this week by the National Library of Australia to provide access to the pictorial collections of a number of Australia\'s leading cultural institutions. http://www.pictureaustralia.org brings together almost 500,000 images of Australia and Australians from the collections of the National Library, the National Archives, the University of Queensland, the State Library of New South Wales, the Australian War Memorial and the State Library of Victoria. \"

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