Online Schools

Former Education Secretary William Bennett is one of the folks out selling some new online schools. Bennett once gave schools\' efforts to increase use of computers in teaching an \"F-\". Cnet has the Full Story.

Washington Post has another story on the same thing. Sounds like a big gamble on some vaporware.

\"It\'s a back-to-basics approach,\" Bennett said. \"We\'re combining traditional learning and powerful technology.\"


New Tech Standards for School Administrators

The NY Times has a Story on how Representatives from the ISTE, the National School Boards Association, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and others are trying to put together some sort of standards for clueless school admins.

\"Administrators need to be comfortable about not knowing everything, but they should know who knows,\" she said. \"They don\'t have to be a network administrator.\"


All About

Brad Stephens sent along this look at . Check it out, this is a really neat idea, and they will be adding more libraries as they go along.

One of the most important trends for all libraries within the
next five years will be developing a "bricks and clicks"
service orientation. With this orientation, not only will
libraries continue offering existing "in-house"
services, but new services will also be developed and existing
services altered so that they can be offered to patrons outside
of the physical building via the web.

Many libraries have already begun developing such resources with
the implementation of remote patron access to subscription
databases, web accessible catalog systems, and email-based
reference - but more can be done. And more is exactly what seeks to provide.


The Great Hunt

How are the the strategies you use when you surf the Web similiar to the ones hunter-gatherers used to find food? [more].

This is the intriguing question posed by New Scientist in this article by Rachel Chalmers, \'Surf Like A Bushman\'.


Dogpile Saves Lives

Search Engine Guide has this really strange article about a man who was having a heart attack, jumped on Dogpile did a boolean search, and saved his own life. Who said that Internet was bad for you.\"While doing homework for a class at Sinclair Community College, Mr. Russell found himself facing an adversary even more dangerous than Simon Bar Sinister; chest pains. As the pains quickly became severe and a terrible pressure grew in his chest, Mr. Russell became concerned. He decided to launch a search on Dogpile to help him track down a list of heart attack symptoms to see if they matched what he was feeling. Relying on Dogpile\'s ability to handle Boolean search commands, Mr. Russell typed \'symptoms and \"heart attack\"\' to help him pinpoint the life saving information he needed fast.\"


I Saw You in the Paper

Here is an interesting little tidbit by Ananova about a public library in Tennessee publishing the names of patrons who have overdue materials in the local paper. Now, I have always wanted to see my name in the newspaper, but not this way. I hope they are not printing the names of the books that these delinquents have out\"The Lawrence County Public Library, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, published a notice containing more than 100 names of people who have failed to bring their books back.

And the strategy appears to be working, because some books which had been out of circulation for up to two years, have been returned.\"


That Guy Who Hit Stephen King OD\'d on Painkillers

You will have scroll down a bit to find this story from the Mount Washington Valley about the man who mysteriously died after hitting the king of horror. It turnd out that he might have overdosed on painkillers. This freaky story takes another odd turn when we find out that the guy may have died on Stephen King\'s birthday.\"The motorist who gained notoriety when he struck Stephen King with his van died of an accidental overdose of a painkiller, according to the state medical examiner’s office.
Bryan Smith, 43, of Fryeburg, died from an overdose of fentanyl, according to toxicology reports. He was found dead in his home on Sept. 22, three days after he was last seen by family members.\". Further down on the page, read about a book that was taken off a required reading list, but not out of the library...and the appeals that will be forthcoming.


New Bible, and Logophilia Stories

The everhelpful Lee Hadden writes :

\"The ever popular Smithsonian Magazine has two articles of interest to
librarians this month (Volume 31, no. 9, December 2000).

The first article is about the new manuscript copy of the Holy Bible
being inscribed with calligraphy at St. John\'s College, Collegeville,
Minnesota. This is the first hand inscribed copy of the Bible (in the
English language New Revised Standard Version instead of in Latin) to be
completed by the authentic methods and techniques from the Middle Ages in
the last five hundred years. The article by Per Ola et al, \"Inscribing the
Word,\" is on pages 79-83.

A second article on logophilia (a love of words) discusses a popular
a-word-a-day service and website that presents new words, their meanings
and etymology. \"Warning: Logophilia is Addictive\" is by Rudolph Chelminski,
and this article can be found on pages 66-74.\"


Paying Through the Mouth

Here is a pretty neat story from the Charlston Gazette. A library has decided to take cans of food as payment for overdue library materials. The food is then distributed to homeless shelters.\"Your momentary joy at recovering the long-lost book probably has faded fast amid thoughts of the fine that has accrued over the months.

But fear not. With a can of creamed corn or a box of wild rice, you can return Harry to his home without straining your pocketbook - and help feed people in need at the same time.\"


A New Library!! (with nothing in it)

No, this is not a repeat from a few weeks ago. Yet another library has opened it\'s doors without really being complete. My mother always told me that first impressions were very important. Head and Shoulders has also made it clear that you only get one shot to make a good first impression. However, despite the fact that the library is slightly bare, the residents love the new place. The full story is a available from the Binghamton Press.\"Although Wednesday marks the one-month anniversary of Broome County Library opening its doors at its new $7.8-million location on Court Street, the building is still not fully operational.\"



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