News

Paying Through the Mouth

Here is a pretty neat story from the Charlston Gazette. A library has decided to take cans of food as payment for overdue library materials. The food is then distributed to homeless shelters.\"Your momentary joy at recovering the long-lost book probably has faded fast amid thoughts of the fine that has accrued over the months.

But fear not. With a can of creamed corn or a box of wild rice, you can return Harry to his home without straining your pocketbook - and help feed people in need at the same time.\" -- Read More

A New Library!! (with nothing in it)

No, this is not a repeat from a few weeks ago. Yet another library has opened it\'s doors without really being complete. My mother always told me that first impressions were very important. Head and Shoulders has also made it clear that you only get one shot to make a good first impression. However, despite the fact that the library is slightly bare, the residents love the new place. The full story is a available from the Binghamton Press.\"Although Wednesday marks the one-month anniversary of Broome County Library opening its doors at its new $7.8-million location on Court Street, the building is still not fully operational.\" -- Read More

R&D: Research Developments (In the News)

Bill Lucey runs the R&D: Research Developments (In the News) web log. News summaries, accompanied with hyperlinks on the following topics:


1.) Inauguration Web site-Library of Congress
2.) Public Record Databases
3.) Seattle Newspaper Strike
4.) Toy Safety-Consumer News
5.) Digital Reference Service
6.) Preservation of Historic Papers-British Library
7.) Gutenberg Bible
8.) ``Resources Worth Noting\'\'

Coke Ads, Instant Books and Canadian Publishing

Lee Hadden writes:


There are several articles of interest in the Marketplace or \"B
Section\" of today\'s Wall Street Journal (11/29/00). An article on page
B1 by Erin White is \"Election Drama Prompts and Passel of Instant Books.\"
It discusses the number of books to come out soon about the presidential
election mess, and also discusses the \"quickie books\" market that
flourished with the O.J. Simpson trial and the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

A second article beginning on page B3 by Elena Cherney, \"Planned
Takeover Would Give Investors up to 50% of Canada\'s Book Trade\" discusses
Canadian takeover artists Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman and their
plans that could give them control of 30-50% of Canada\'s retail book trade
if they are successful. Their bookstore chain, Indigo Books Music and More,
have launched an unsolicited offer for Canada\'s largest bookseller,
Chapters Inc.

And finally, on page B11, an article \"Coke Plans to Donate 50 Years of
TV Spots to Library of Congress\" discusses the plan to donate 20,000 world
wide TV advertisements by the Coca-Cola Company. These ads date from over
the last fifty years. These include the famous \"Mean Joe Green\" commercial,
as well as the popular \"Hilltop\" commercial where a young chorus sings \"I\'d
Like to Buy the World a Coke...\" The ads will be catalogued, digitized and
turned over to the Library of Congress during the next three to five years.
Drink it all in at the library!

The SLIS UNDERGROUND

SLIS Undergroundsent in a link to their site, rather intersting for those fighting the powers that be:


The medium, SLIS UNDERGROUND, was created with the intention of providing SLIS students enrolled at the University of Wisconsin - Madison with a forum in which to express their opinions about library and information science and their educational/professional experiences within the field.

geocities.com/slis_underground/mainpage.htm

Realizing that much of what we are being taught is subjective.
Realizing that information itself is subjective; everything is changed, greatly or subtly, by the filter through which it passes.
Understanding that as future librarians, archivists, catalogers, indexers, school media specialists, editors, censors, and free-thinking students of human nature we have a right to comment upon and question all information.
To bring to ideas to the forefront and provide a media through which comments can be made for which there was no time in class.
To encourage critical thinking within the SLIS student body.
To show the SLIS faculty that we care enough about library and information science to go to the trouble of establishing an entity beyond the academic establishment through which we can further discuss what we are being taught, what we are reading, and how the information is being presented

Anatomy of a book controversy

Bob Cox sent in In Depth look on some book challenges in GA. The Savannah-Chatham County Public Schools Board of Education initially voted 4-3 not to allow the use of \"In Cold Blood,\" \"A Lesson Before Dying,\" \"Stones from the River,\" \"Lords of Discipline\" and \"Catcher in the Rye.\", then re-voted after they said to make sure that summer reading lists for AP English students contain at least 10 choices and are given out one month before school ends. The books ended up NOT being banned.

\"As far as we are concerned, you are still stonewalling the concept of parental/citizen involvement. This whole process has been disgusting and demeaning. The endorsement of putting trash in the minds of children by a school system is horrifying to think of and it is dangerous to the social stability of this great country.\"

UK Public Libraries commemorated by coin.

Charles Davis writes \"In August 1850 the Public Libraries Act received Royal Assent, allowing ordinary people to enjoy free access to books and laying the foundations of today\'s national UK network of public libraries.


To mark the 150th anniversary of the Act, which brought knowledge and literature within the reach of every member of society, a commemorative 50p coin has been produced by the Royal Mint.
See:
royalmint.com \"

News flash!

Someone suggested this rather odd story from

http://www.cantonrep.com/

Police say a man accused of exposing his private parts at the library used his own library card to take out books at Chardon Public Library.

The man pleaded innocent Monday to a charge of public indecency, he says he only lifted his shirt to show the librarians his stomach and did not expose his genitals.

Note to self: Use someone else\'s library card next time!

Stamp of Approval

Charles Davis writes \"The image of a Bodleian Library, Oxford manuscript appears in the penultimate set of Royal Mail millennium stamps which double up as this year’s UK Christmas stamps.


Each of the four stamps in the set is designed to illustrate a millennium project with a Christian theme.
The 45p stamp marks the opening of a centre devoted to the story of St Patrick in Downpatrick, Co. Down, where the saint is reputed to be buried.


The stamp shows the opening of the Mass of Christmas Day, with a decorated initial P (opening the text, ‘Puer natus est’) and musical notation for plainsong, from a late-twelfth-century Gradual (MS. Rawl. C. 892, fol. 9r), the book containing the variable and fixed parts of the Mass to be sung by a choir or soloist.


The origin of the manuscript is in fact uncertain, but some of its liturgical features make a connection with the monastic cathedral of Downpatrick a possibility.
It was bequeathed to Oxford by Richard Rawlinson (1690-1755).
The photograph for the stamp was taken by Jacky Merralls and Nick Cistone in the Bodleian Photographic Studio.
See:
royalmail.com \"

Good Libraries, poor memories

Boozhoo (Ojibwe for greetings),

Anishaabe poet, Professor Denise Sweet, speaking at the Wisconsin Library Association noted that a tribal elder had once told a European American librarian that they had \"GOOD LIBRARIES but POOR MEMORIES while the opposite was true for his people.\" Oral cultures have both advantages and disadvantages as compared to print and now media cultures.

This put me in mind of my article, The Catalog as Community,\" to be published in the magazine Library Computing and posted on my web site at the HAPLR web site indicated below.

http://haplr-index.com/catalog_as_community.htm -- Read More

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