News

Noisy Libraries Speak Volumes About Us

Someone sent along This Story from The Washington
Post
on the Arlington Road branch library in
Bethesda. Not the quiet library you would expect, and
just too loud for this author.

\"No, thanks.\" I wanted to say. \"I\'ll just head on
over to someplace where I can concentrate, like Chuck
E. Cheese.\"

Online Reference in S.F.

Soneome passed along This Story from mercurycenter.com about how Bay Area libraries have banded together to do online reference.

About 80 reference librarians from 25 libraries are linked up to staff qandacafe.org and qandacafe.com.
Note: San Fran residents only

Disaster and Destruction Along the Information Superhighway

This one comes from The Nando Times. It seems that all over the U.S. crews are destroying city streets, homes and businesses in order to make room for high speed Internet access. The problem isn\'t so much what they\'re doing, but what they\'re leaving behind. [more...]

So Long, Digerati: The Vanishing Digital Divide

Slashdot has an interesting jon Katz Story on the digital divide.

He says That computer and Net use are exploding among all age groups and class, racial and ethnic categories. The much-hyped tech slump has mostly hit poorly run, ill-conceived dot.coms, not mainstream technological use or growth.

SO is the digital divide really shrinking?
Does it matter?

A Look Around The Web

Homeless Man Finds Home on the Web at the Library

From the Cincinnati Enquirer...
For six years, Mark Pierce lived under a piece of canvas near the Ohio River. He slept on a foam mattress retrieved from a Dumpster. He kept clean with jugs of water. In his own words, he was “tired, depressed, resentful and hateful” - just one of the region\'s estimated 1,400 homeless. Then Mr. Pierce found the Internet, and everything changed. He became a man with a home page, if not a home. [more...]

Up in Arms About Usenet

Wired has this article on the Google takeover of deja\'s archives. Google has temporarily taken the archive offline, and people are angry. They also believe that the coding that google is going to use for the database should be open source.\"Some suggest the best place for the archives would be the Library of Congress. But one former Deja user wants to create an open-source, community-based Usenet archive and has asked Google to contribute the programming code of the old Deja service to the open-source community and give the project full access to the Usenet archive.\" -- Read More

Over $1 Billion in E-Rate Money Lost Under Reams of Bureaucratic Red Tape

Wired had this to report today on the continuing saga of the missing e-rate funds.....\"The e-rate has been hailed as a lifesaver for bringing schools and libraries into the information age. Now a study by the General Accounting Office reveals that $1.3 billion in e-rate funding has gone unspent, leaving some schools without the Net access that they are entitled to. What happened to the money? [more...]

Your Patrons Can\'t Search for Sex

According to this article from Cyber Atlas, a tremendous number of web users still do not know how to search. Also, the most popular search term is \"sex\". I think that the cartoon from the other day says it all. Librarians NEED to be the search engines.\"The study also found that the most popular term people search for online is \"sex.\" Alexa\'s findings are based on an examination of more than 42 million search pages viewed in aggregate by users of the Alexa toolbar at 10 of the Internet\'s leading portals and search engines -- altavista.com, aol.com, excite.com, go.com, google.com, goto.com, lycos.com, msn.com, netscape.com, and yahoo.com -- between March 1999 and January 2001.\"
Read the study here -- Read More

Saint of the \'Net

Brian writes \"globetechnology.com is one of a number of sites with This Story:

The Pope is reportedly going to name Isidore of Seville as the patron saint of computer programmers and the Internet. Isidore wrote a 20-volume encyclopedia in the 7th century.

One guy jokes, \"If we\'re talking about Silicon Valley, I had always assumed that San Jose was the patron saint of the Internet.\"

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