News

Blackberry distractions?

I'm a Blackberry fan. I don't do much texting on it, but just the other day I brought it to a faculty meeting so that I wouldn't have to print out a pile of documents or struggle to read the notes and attachments on the projector. It is so ingrained in the faculty that cell phone use during class is a disraction; I wondered if any in the group thought that I was up to no good?

It was interesting to read about reactions to Representative Eric Cantor's use of his Blackberry. I know that there are certain expectations of congressional members at presidential speeches and other functions, and I'm not comparing a faculty meeting to the President's address, but perhaps Cantor was actually doing what he said he was doing:

"Cantor said he was reading excerpts of Obama's speech on the BlackBerry and taking notes as he did so".

More at the Richmond Times-Dispatch

Washington State Library releases new "Hard Times Resource Guide"

For the past few months, staff at the Washington State Library have been working hard, exhaustively scouring the web and compiling quality resources to help library users across Washington State. The result? A thorough guide detailing resources and techniques to help you and your users navigate this tough economy. We've covered numerous subjects, including health and nutrition, family and parenting, finances, job-seeking, and a whole lot more.

Check it out now at http://www.secstate.wa.gov/library/hardtimes/.

Have a question? Try Ask-WA!

Ask-WA is pleased to announce the launch of Washington State's first online virtual reference portal. Connecting more than 60 libraries across the state, and backed by a worldwide cooperative, Ask-WA provides 24/7 reference service to the library users of Washington State.

Ask-WA is an essential resource for students looking for citations at three in the morning, for Washington residents doing personal research, for genealogists. Washington librarians are available to help you get started on that tough research project, investigate your family roots, or even just settle a bet.

Don't wait, ask us a question now at http://ask.wa.gov!

Utah Gets Tough With Texting Drivers

In most states, if somebody is texting behind the wheel and causes a crash that injures or kills someone, the penalty can be as light as a fine.

Utah is much tougher.

After a crash here that killed two scientists — and prompted a dogged investigation by a police officer and local victim’s advocate — Utah passed the nation’s toughest law to crack down on texting behind the wheel. Offenders now face up to 15 years in prison.

Full story in the NYT

Dogs Blamed For Killing Georgia Couple Are Euthanized

On August 16th there was a story on LISNEWS about a Georgia couple that was found dead on a country road. One of them was a librarian the other a professor.

Today there was a follow up in the news. The couple had been killed by wild dogs. Story here.

Couple found in Oglethorpe were UGA librarian, husband

Oglethorpe County authorities this afternoon released the names of the husband and wife whose bodies were found along a rural road off Georgia Highway 77 on Saturday morning. They were Lothar Karl Schweder 77, and Sherry L. Schweder, 65.

Full story here.

Why The Associated Press Plans to Hold Some Web Content off the Wire

In a break with tradition, The Associated Press plans to prevent members and customers from publishing some AP content on their websites. Instead, those news organizations would link to the content on a central AP website — a move that could upend the consortium’s traditional notions of syndication.

That’s one revelation from a document we obtained (labeled “AP CONFIDENTIAL — NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION”) that offers new insight into how the AP is planning to reinvent itself on the Internet according to Neiman Lab, Harvard University.

The seven-page briefing, entitled “Protect, Point, Pay — An Associated Press Plan for Reclaiming News Content Online,” was distributed to AP members late last month. It provides greater detail about the tracking device that will be attached to AP content and describes their plans to create topic pages around news stories to rival Wikipedia and major aggregation sites. And in an hour-long interview last night, the AP’s general counsel, Srinandan Kasi, also shed light on how the consortium views reuse of its material across the Internet.

Postal Service Faces Gloom Of Economy

The U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it lost $2.4 billion between April and June. It's on track to be $7 billion in debt by the end of September.

"What has occurred with the economy is unprecedented," Postmaster General John Potter said. "It's created, obviously, a much bigger challenge than we are able to respond to in a very quick manner."

Potter is appearing before a Senate panel Thursday to talk about the financial troubles.

Lawmakers have urged the Postal Service to make hard choices. But truth be told, lawmakers, not the Postal Service, have been the ones dragging their feet.

"This is a mixed message that we're sending," Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) said.

Full story at NPR

Update from Louisville

Louisville Public Library flood update here.

Shooter Read Sexist Christian Author's Book Before Female Aerobics Class Massacre

Huffington Post blog entry:
Media analysis has so far ignored or glossed over Sodini's religious affiliations but the shooter's Internet diary suggest his last readings were the Bible and a book by a Texas evangelist, R.B. Thieme, Jr. who has written that husbands own their wives, as literal property and promoted an odd teaching that for each man on Earth there exists only one correct "right woman" in all creation. According to Thieme, men can recognize their divinely-appointed opposites without physical contact, through something Thieme called "soul climax"

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