News

Couple found in Oglethorpe were UGA librarian, husband

Oglethorpe County authorities this afternoon released the names of the husband and wife whose bodies were found along a rural road off Georgia Highway 77 on Saturday morning. They were Lothar Karl Schweder 77, and Sherry L. Schweder, 65.

Full story here.

Why The Associated Press Plans to Hold Some Web Content off the Wire

In a break with tradition, The Associated Press plans to prevent members and customers from publishing some AP content on their websites. Instead, those news organizations would link to the content on a central AP website — a move that could upend the consortium’s traditional notions of syndication.

That’s one revelation from a document we obtained (labeled “AP CONFIDENTIAL — NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION”) that offers new insight into how the AP is planning to reinvent itself on the Internet according to Neiman Lab, Harvard University.

The seven-page briefing, entitled “Protect, Point, Pay — An Associated Press Plan for Reclaiming News Content Online,” was distributed to AP members late last month. It provides greater detail about the tracking device that will be attached to AP content and describes their plans to create topic pages around news stories to rival Wikipedia and major aggregation sites. And in an hour-long interview last night, the AP’s general counsel, Srinandan Kasi, also shed light on how the consortium views reuse of its material across the Internet.

Postal Service Faces Gloom Of Economy

The U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it lost $2.4 billion between April and June. It's on track to be $7 billion in debt by the end of September.

"What has occurred with the economy is unprecedented," Postmaster General John Potter said. "It's created, obviously, a much bigger challenge than we are able to respond to in a very quick manner."

Potter is appearing before a Senate panel Thursday to talk about the financial troubles.

Lawmakers have urged the Postal Service to make hard choices. But truth be told, lawmakers, not the Postal Service, have been the ones dragging their feet.

"This is a mixed message that we're sending," Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) said.

Full story at NPR

Update from Louisville

Louisville Public Library flood update here.

Shooter Read Sexist Christian Author's Book Before Female Aerobics Class Massacre

Huffington Post blog entry:
Media analysis has so far ignored or glossed over Sodini's religious affiliations but the shooter's Internet diary suggest his last readings were the Bible and a book by a Texas evangelist, R.B. Thieme, Jr. who has written that husbands own their wives, as literal property and promoted an odd teaching that for each man on Earth there exists only one correct "right woman" in all creation. According to Thieme, men can recognize their divinely-appointed opposites without physical contact, through something Thieme called "soul climax"

Louisville (KY) Free Public Library Hit by Flash Flood; Damage at Least One Million Dollars

Photos of the disaster from Libraryman and Greg Schwartz, who's in the midst of it. Hang in there Greg & staff!

UPDATE Officials say the floodwaters caused at least $1 million in damage to the library main branch. A recovery fund has been established. Donations can be sent to:

The Library Foundation
301 York Street
Louisville, KY 40203

Louisville Free Public Library Director Craig Buthod said the Main Library had about three feet of water in the basement, and that the building will be closed until further notice. “We will assess the damage today and tomorrow. I don't know when we'll reopen,” he said.

The Shawnee and Iroquois branches of the library were also closed because of flooding, Buthod said.

Buthod said water had heavily damaged extensive facilities located on the Main Library's lower level, much of which is used for operations.

“Thousands of books have been damaged,” including many new ones that had just arrived and were awaiting distribution throughout the system, Buthod said. Story from the Louisville Courier Journal.

A.P. Ready to Recieve Your Payments...Even For Articles in the Public Domain

Article in BoingBoing:
James Grimmelman sez,

The Associated Press -- which thinks you owe it a license fee if you quote more than four words from one of its articles -- doesn't even care if the words actually came from its article. They'll charge you anyway, even if you're quoting from the public domain.

I picked a random AP article and went to their "reuse options" site. Then, when they asked what I wanted to quote, I punched in Thomas Jefferson's famous argument against copyright. Their license fee: $12 for an educational 26-word quote. FROM THE PUBLIC FREAKING DOMAIN, and obviously, obviously not from the AP article. But the AP is too busy trying to squeeze the last few cents out of a dying business model to care about little things like free speech or the law.

Thanks to Bill Drew & Michael Sauers for the tip.

Like Barcodes, But In Reverse

Even with the shift to RFID tags, many libraries still use barcodes. A good many of the libraries using RFID use both the tags and the barcodes.

We're all familiar with the technology; a laser passes over the code and reads it through measurement of reflected light.

A new technology in coded information utilizes something similar but in reverse. Called a Bokode, it uses a small LED covered by a lens with dark patches on it. To read it, you need a camera and some software. The dark patches detail the data and the data given out varies with angle. In other words, a Bokode on a book right in front of you might tell you an item number and title with brief synapsis. A Bokode on a book a little farther down (taken with the same camera at the same time) might tell you why you might like this book if you're interested in that one.

But for my money, here's what makes my little Circulation Supervisor brain titter with glee:

"Let's say you're standing in a library with 20 shelves in front of you and thousands of books."

"You could take a picture and you'd immediately know where the book you're looking for is."

More from the BBC.

Teens Not Into Twitter, TV, Radio, or Newspapers

Interesting story at Read Write Web on teens and what they are into these days. Begs the question on how best to serve this demographic.

"Matthew Robson, a 15-year-old intern at analyst firm Morgan Stanley recently helped compile a report about teenage media habits. Overnight, his findings have become a sensation...which goes to show that people are either obsessed with what "the kids" are into or there's a distinctive lack of research being done on this demographics' media use. Robson's report isn't even based on any sort of statistical analysis, just good ol' fashioned teenage honesty. And what was it that he said to cause all this attention? Only that teens aren't into traditional media (think TV, radio, newspapers) and yet they're eschewing some new media, too, including sites like Twitter."

Syndicate content