News

News Corporation, Google, and reading the news @ your library

Whatever the outcome of the current struggle between Google and News Corporation, public libraries hope to continue to be a source for high-quality news content, through subscription resources and other offerings.

More thoughts here from the Delaware division of libraries blog: http://library.blogs.delaware.gov/2009/12/07/daily-news-content-going-offline/

What's New Over On LISWire - The Librarian's News Wire

Over at LISWire ( http://liswire.com/ ) - The Librarian's News Wire we have now posted over 200 releases. You can subscribe to one of our mailing lists Right Here. You can grab the main LISWire RSS Feed Here. There are a bunch of other feeds you can subscribe to listed Right Here. You can also follow along on Twitter Right Here. -- Read More

Subcultural News Portal gets play at Staid InfoToday.

Info Today's "Newsbreaks" has published a piece on Web 2.0 updates by The Disinformation Company. Disinfo.com has been a subcultural/countercultural newsportal since before the fall of Loompanics Unlimited; now they've geared up to use 2.0 tools on their main site to bolster book and film sales, and to support their podcasting interests. The early disinfo.com pages anticipated folksonomic tagging, and served as a virtual meeting place for the folks like Terence McKenna, Grant Morrison, Robert Anton Wilson, and Douglas Rushkoff.

Click by Click, Libraries and Readers Wade Into Digital Lending

From the NY Times:

"Eager to attract digitally savvy patrons and capitalize on the growing popularity of electronic readers, public libraries across the country are expanding collections of books that reside on servers rather than shelves.

The idea is to capture borrowers who might not otherwise use the library, as well as to give existing customers the opportunity to try new formats."

Oss-ILS Research Project: Call for Participants

As part of an IMLS funded Early Career Research Grant, Dr. Vandana Singh (Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences at University of Tennessee-Knoxville) is working on a 3 year research project that will compare the technical support for Open Source Integrated Library Systems with proprietary Integrated Library Systems.

In phase 1 of this research project, we are collecting data regarding the expectations of librarians for technical support and the available channels of technical support. We will identify the expectations of librarians about technical support for ILS (both open source software and proprietary software. And, we will assess the effectiveness of the current channels and processes for technical support in satisfying the expectations of the librarians.

At this stage, we are looking for participants interested in contributing to this study. If you would be willing to participate in the study or can make some recommendations for potential participants that would be greatly appreciated. At this time, the only information we are soliciting is:

Are you currently using an ILS?
Are you using an open source or proprietary ILS?
What type of library are you working in? (School, Public, Academic, Special, etc.)
Is your library in rural area or urban?
Would you be willing to participate in this study? (Participation entails responding to survey questions administered electronically and/or participating in interviews).
If you are interested in the general description and progress of the project, you can find more information at -- Read More

Newspapers Go To Washington

Washington is paying attention to the newspaper crisis. The president has even weighed in. But some worry that any government help would create a conflict of interest. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), sponsor of The Newspaper Revitalization Act, and Jim Moroney, publisher of The Dallas Morning News discuss what role, if any, the government should play in saving newspapers.

Beyond NPR, our in-house podcast team discussed the issue in the second half of the episode A LISTen Special: Kiwi Surprise With A Side Of Buckeye Candy.

News Flash: Reprieve for Philly Libraries

Late Thursday afternoon, the Pennsylvania State senate passed bill 1828 by a vote of 32 to 17. For all of you who have been following the saga over the city's budget crisis, this is indeed the legislation that was needed for the City of Philadelphia to avoid the "Doomsday" Plan C budget scenario, which would have resulted in the layoff of 3,000 city employees and forced the closing of all libraries.

More from the Free Library's website.

Blackberry distractions?

I'm a Blackberry fan. I don't do much texting on it, but just the other day I brought it to a faculty meeting so that I wouldn't have to print out a pile of documents or struggle to read the notes and attachments on the projector. It is so ingrained in the faculty that cell phone use during class is a disraction; I wondered if any in the group thought that I was up to no good?

It was interesting to read about reactions to Representative Eric Cantor's use of his Blackberry. I know that there are certain expectations of congressional members at presidential speeches and other functions, and I'm not comparing a faculty meeting to the President's address, but perhaps Cantor was actually doing what he said he was doing:

"Cantor said he was reading excerpts of Obama's speech on the BlackBerry and taking notes as he did so".

More at the Richmond Times-Dispatch

Washington State Library releases new "Hard Times Resource Guide"

For the past few months, staff at the Washington State Library have been working hard, exhaustively scouring the web and compiling quality resources to help library users across Washington State. The result? A thorough guide detailing resources and techniques to help you and your users navigate this tough economy. We've covered numerous subjects, including health and nutrition, family and parenting, finances, job-seeking, and a whole lot more.

Check it out now at http://www.secstate.wa.gov/library/hardtimes/.

Have a question? Try Ask-WA!

Ask-WA is pleased to announce the launch of Washington State's first online virtual reference portal. Connecting more than 60 libraries across the state, and backed by a worldwide cooperative, Ask-WA provides 24/7 reference service to the library users of Washington State.

Ask-WA is an essential resource for students looking for citations at three in the morning, for Washington residents doing personal research, for genealogists. Washington librarians are available to help you get started on that tough research project, investigate your family roots, or even just settle a bet.

Don't wait, ask us a question now at http://ask.wa.gov!

Syndicate content