State Libraries

Accidental Library Research

What happens when a library forgets to send out overdue notices for almost two years?
A small Delaware library was accidentally omitted from a centralized overdue notice report, for a VERY extended period of time, and for various reasons, this wasn't noticed until recently. Before fixing the problem, administrators took the opportunity to examine the outcomes of two years of sending no overdue notices, with results that may suprise some, and may validate others long-held opinions about the usefulness of notices. Click on the link for the full story at the Delaware Libraries blog.

The Desk Setup: A Look At Librarian Computers

The Desk Setup

Like many technologists, I may have had some vague notion that librarians had something to contribute to discussions about information and metadata and standards and access, but my concept of what librarians did and what they knew probably had more to do with stereotypes and anecdote than on an understanding of reality. Which is a shame. Although in the last few years I think we’ve done a really good job of making clearer connections between libraries and technology, I don’t think anyone is surprised when librarians are omitted from discussions about and between prominent technologists, such as the one facilitated by the Setup. (Note: by “librarians” I mean anyone who works in, with, or for libraries. Hat tip to Eli Neiburger for saying what I’d been thinking, only less clearly, for some time before he said those words out loud.)

NJ Librarians Are Mad as Hell And They're Not Going to Take It Anymore

WAYNE NJ — Hundreds gathered at the State House Annex in Trenton recently to oppose Gov. Chris Christie's proposal to cut 74 percent of funding for the state library system, an action many believe will be nothing less than devastating.

Library patrons from across New Jersey voiced their concerns over the proposed cuts via 60,000 orange postcards hand delivered the day of the rally including 5,000 from the Wayne Public Library and its Preakness branch. Employees from the Valley Road location joined forces with over 650 people who filled the annex courtyard to help spread the message that "libraries matter."

"I feel we needed to do our part because these cuts being proposed would be disastrous," said Doreen Shoba, head of the reference department at the Wayne Public Library.

Included in the cuts would be the elimination of all statewide library programs and services. New Jersey stands to lose roughly $4.5 million in federal funding leaving clientele severely impacted. Amongst the biggest losses will be access to electronic databases such as RefUSA and EBSCO, as well as the statewide interlibrary loan and delivery service. Many libraries including Wayne could also lose access to the Internet as well.

Florida's 'The library guy' takes a Capitol victory lap

The man they call "the library guy," Paul Clark, returned to the State Capitol Tuesday carrying a simple, happy message: "Thank you."

The 39-year-old father of three put a very human face on the 2010 legislative session through his sheer tenacity. Day after day, Clark stood silently in the Capitol pleading for lawmakers to find $21-million to maintain the level of state support for public libraries.

When lawmakers came through near midnight Monday, Senate budget chief JD Alexander made a passing reference to "that guy" who persisted in getting library money. Clark, who earns about $45,000 a year, had forfeited most of his personal vacation time to push for funding-- including putting in a 12-hour day on Sunday in the Knott Building, where budget negotiations took place.

Delaware libraries support lifelong learning.

Delaware libraries support of lifelong learning spans all age groups. Its innovative "Learning Journeys" program includes new resources oriented towards young learners, and has received enthusiastic support from parents and stakeholders such as Even Start. You can read th full posting at the Division of Libraries blog: http://library.blogs.delaware.gov/2010/01/26/eggplants-and-lifelong-learning/

State Library Closes to Relocate

Topeka, KS - A big move for the State Library of Kansas means it will shut its doors temporarily. It will be closed to the public Friday, Dec. 18 and remain closed through Tuesday, Dec. 29.

The closure will facilitate the State Library’s move from its third floor, north wing Statehouse location to 169W, which is mobile units located at the southwest corner of the Statehouse.

The library will be accessible from the West doors on First floor beginning Dec. 30. The move includes 22 full-time staff, 300,000 documents and books, 39 computers, printers and copiers, more than 30 desks and chairs, and numerous file cabinets.

Delaware to add new libraries to statewide catalog

In a recent blog post, the Delaware Library Catalog announced the addition of two significant libraries to the growing statewide catalog. The Wilmington Public Library will migrate from its current Horizon ILS to the Delaware Division of Libraries- managed and SirsiDynix-hosted Symphony system. Wilmington Library patrons will enjoy the enhanced services offered by the statewide system, and existing patrons will be able to easily access the more than 200,000 items held by the Wilmington Library, which has served the citizens of Delaware's largest city at its current downtown site since 1922. In addition, the Wilmington University will upgrade from its current Unicorn system and migrate its holdings to the statewide system, providing the potential to coordinate academic holdings with DLC's existing academic partners the Delaware Technical and Community College and Wesley College

Save the State Library of Massachusetts

At a press conference on Thursday, October 29, the Massachusetts Governor's Office announced that Governor Patrick is considering closing the State Library of Massachusetts as a cost-saving measure. This closure will have a monumental impact on the cultural heritage of the Commonwealth.

Open to the public since 1826, the State Library has developed comprehensive collections in the areas of government documents, law, Massachusetts history, and public and current affairs. From the Bradford manuscript "Of Plimoth Plantation" to the ever-expanding digital repository, the State Library has collected items of crucial importance to the record of Massachusetts' historical wealth.

Please sign our online petition to show your support of the State Library of Massachusetts:

Additionally, if you would like to contact the Governor's office directly, please visit his website .

If you would like to make a donation, please visit the Friends of the State Library page at http://www.mass.gov/lib

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Washington State Library releases new "Hard Times Resource Guide"

For the past few months, staff at the Washington State Library have been working hard, exhaustively scouring the web and compiling quality resources to help library users across Washington State. The result? A thorough guide detailing resources and techniques to help you and your users navigate this tough economy. We've covered numerous subjects, including health and nutrition, family and parenting, finances, job-seeking, and a whole lot more.

Check it out now at http://www.secstate.wa.gov/library/hardtimes/.

Have a question? Try Ask-WA!

Ask-WA is pleased to announce the launch of Washington State's first online virtual reference portal. Connecting more than 60 libraries across the state, and backed by a worldwide cooperative, Ask-WA provides 24/7 reference service to the library users of Washington State.

Ask-WA is an essential resource for students looking for citations at three in the morning, for Washington residents doing personal research, for genealogists. Washington librarians are available to help you get started on that tough research project, investigate your family roots, or even just settle a bet.

Don't wait, ask us a question now at http://ask.wa.gov!

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