Technology

Paper as Portal

I\'m not sure what to make of this. It scares me, and at the same time, it could be used for good, more than evil.

\"Digimarc, a company previously involved with watermarking technologies, has developed an extremely intriguing application for the PC camera which enables direct print-to-web advertising. The technology, dubbed MediaBridge, incorporates the PC camera, the Internet and print media into one streamlined advertising process. ... the MediaBridge technology is an important example of how PC cameras can be used outside of the traditional video mail, web posting and videoconferencing applications.\"

This allows you to put ads into a book that appear on a computer screen, \"Paper as Portal\" they call it.Check it out and let us know what you think! -- Read More

Cyborgs and Semantic Interoperability

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes \"This is (partly) satire.

In the February 2000 issue of Wired Magazine is the article \"Cyborg 1.0\" It is subtitled: \"Kevin Warwick outlines his plan to become one with his computer.\" Warwick, what a great irony, for catalogers, no? Warwick, a research in Great Britain, not a Framework or \"container.\" decribes his experiment to implant a chip in his arm and an attempt to record his emotions and then play them back to his nervous system, eventually, he hopes, over the web! He fears heights, so he will climb a cliff, record the emotion and play it back to his nervous system over the net. Spooky, no? See:
wired.com for the full story.

Readers may be familiar with the attempts by library folk to catalog the net using the Dublin Core and the Warwick Framework. (References below). These catalogers worry that the net is being indexed by search engines that can\'t possibly keep up with fast growing and chaotic web resources. -- Read More

Open Source Library Systems: Getting Started

Dan Chudnov over at OSS4Lib.org has written an excellent article for those not familiar with what open source projects, and how they can be used in libraries.

The biggest news in the software industry in recent months is open source. Every week in the technology news we can read about IBM or Oracle or Netscape or Corel announcing plans to release flagship products as open source or a version of these products that runs on an open source operating system such as Linux. In its defense against the Department of Justice, Microsoft has pointed to Linux and its growing market share as evidence that Microsoft cannot exert unfair monopoly power over the software industry. Dozens of new open source products along with regular news of upgrades, bug fixes, and innovative new features for these products are announced every day at web sites followed by thousands. -- Read More

Trouble with the OPAC

Have you ever seen an entire story devoted to an OPAC? Well Here\'s one from McCalls.com on the troubles with a new OPAC in Bucks County, PA. It seems the new system has more than a few bugs, enough to render it almost useless. $695,000 down the drain?

\"Taos went online in late December. It hardly has performed as expected -- instead of speeding up the search process, Taos has caused logjams at each of the system\'s seven branches. It has not been unusual for Taos to crash, Moody said, freezing the searches of everyone using a computer terminal to track down a book.\" -- Read More

SciNet

Richard Wayne writes \"SciNet (www.scinetcorp.com) from whom many of us bought CD servers, seems to be out of business. The URL still works, but the phones have been disconnected. \"

Automatic Metadata Generator

Ian Macintosh writes: \"tSA Consulting Pty Ltd, based in Canberra, Australia, has announced the release of Klarity (www.klarity.com.au

Klarity is a software program developed to automatically categorise documents based on the concepts found in the text.
Klarity is made available as an API, ready to incorporate into business systems. \"


I played around with the Demonstration online with mixed results. What\'s cool is it also works with the seldom used DC meta tags, which are an OCLC idea. -- Read More

The Information Age: More to Come

Intellectualcapital.com has a great Opinion piece on Vannevar Bushs\"As We May Think\"

Bush\'s essay is astonishing for two reasons. First, his vision of personally
created, associated links of knowledge was prescient. He could see, even
then, the explosion of necessary information beyond a level any human could
manage, and he could imagine the evolution of technology into forms that
would make possible an easily accessible, easily searchable desk-based
library of personal and public knowledge. -- Read More

Forget Copiers: Scanners You Can Take to the library

The NYTimes Has a Storyon cool new pen scanners.

If you have ever done research in a library, you have probably encountered this annoying situation: You\'ve found a paragraph ofhelpful information in an otherwise useless book. There is no point in lugging the book home for the sake of those 300 words. So you face twochoices: transcribe the paragraph by hand or trot over to the photocopy machine, stand in line, fish around for change and make three copies the wrong size before getting one that captures what you want. -- Read More

Hardcore, Futuristic Geeks need only Apply! - Cool site suggestion!

search-engines-web.com writes "This Microsoft site is an esoteric gem - to discover new 21st century directions that Microsoft is heading in. it is more of a reflection of anticipated technology that may approach mainstream in a couple of decades...Warning... Only Hardcore Geeks need Apply"

Beyond PDF: Digital Delivery Develops

An Anonymous Patron writes "Beyond PDF is an EContent Magazine article on the PDF which has solidified its place as the leader in electronic document distribution. They say even Adobe has recognized that the PDF format has certain limitations and recently come out with a platform to use the PDF as a front end to distribute information throughout the enterprise using XML."

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