Technology

Top Technology Trends for Libraries

Pat Ensor writes \"Top Technology Trends for Libraries: Y2K - from the Library and Information Technology Association

What technological issues have a good chance of affecting libraries in the next few years? A dozen leading members of the
Library and Information Technology Association are keeping up with that and discussing issues online and in person, so that
you can stay informed.

Read on for details.... -- Read More

Paper connected to the internet

R Hadden sent in this story from theNew Scientist, they have a very interesting Story on a nifty sounding paper.


\"IT\'S goodbye to the idea of the paperless office: a new electronic pen could bring paper back with a bang. Instead of tapping away on a computer keyboard, the new pen lets you scribble e-mails freehand on special paper and then send it across the Internet via your mobile phone.\" -- Read More

Encyclopedia Fits Into Palm of Hand

Excite News Has this interesting business-side oriented story on how Encyclopaedia Britannica\'s image has seen a dizzying transformation.

\"The new, gizmo-loving side of the august publisher showed through again Monday with the introduction of a software application that gives users of Palm handheld computers access to all 44 million words of the encyclopedia.

\"Britannica now goes wherever you go,\" said Don Yannias, chief executive officer of Britannica.com Inc., the Chicago encyclopedia publisher\'s digital arm.
\" -- Read More

Programming languages covered by First Amendment

News.com is reporting on an interesting court ruling in CA.

\"A federal appeals court today cleared the way for a law professor to post previously banned encryption software on the Internet, finding that computer code qualifies as speech protected by the First Amendment.

The decision hands the U.S. government yet another defeat in its efforts to keep intact federal rules limiting the export of encryption software. Academics and civil liberties groups have mounted several attacks on the regulations, winning a similar result before an appeals court in California, a decision currently under review.\" -- Read More

Read up on Microsoft

Unless you\'ve been on Mars, you know that the U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson says that Microsoft is doing \"violence\" to the competitive process. He has ruled Microsoft \"maintained its monopoly power by anti-competitive means and attempted to monopolize the Web browser market\". You can read the entire ruling At the usdoj.gov. The best story I found was from Jon Katz at Slashdot. He takes a rather interesting outlook on Microsoft and the place it holds on the industry.

\"The Microsoft Age began to unravel when programmers all over the earth connected and demonstrated that they could create a viable, ethical alternative operating system, sharing freely what was costing everybody else billions. It was accelerated by Bill Gates\' profound and distinctly non-visionary arrogance.\"Read on for a few more stories that may be of interest. -- Read More

Paper as Portal

I\'m not sure what to make of this. It scares me, and at the same time, it could be used for good, more than evil.

\"Digimarc, a company previously involved with watermarking technologies, has developed an extremely intriguing application for the PC camera which enables direct print-to-web advertising. The technology, dubbed MediaBridge, incorporates the PC camera, the Internet and print media into one streamlined advertising process. ... the MediaBridge technology is an important example of how PC cameras can be used outside of the traditional video mail, web posting and videoconferencing applications.\"

This allows you to put ads into a book that appear on a computer screen, \"Paper as Portal\" they call it.Check it out and let us know what you think! -- Read More

Cyborgs and Semantic Interoperability

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes \"This is (partly) satire.

In the February 2000 issue of Wired Magazine is the article \"Cyborg 1.0\" It is subtitled: \"Kevin Warwick outlines his plan to become one with his computer.\" Warwick, what a great irony, for catalogers, no? Warwick, a research in Great Britain, not a Framework or \"container.\" decribes his experiment to implant a chip in his arm and an attempt to record his emotions and then play them back to his nervous system, eventually, he hopes, over the web! He fears heights, so he will climb a cliff, record the emotion and play it back to his nervous system over the net. Spooky, no? See:
wired.com for the full story.

Readers may be familiar with the attempts by library folk to catalog the net using the Dublin Core and the Warwick Framework. (References below). These catalogers worry that the net is being indexed by search engines that can\'t possibly keep up with fast growing and chaotic web resources. -- Read More

Open Source Library Systems: Getting Started

Dan Chudnov over at OSS4Lib.org has written an excellent article for those not familiar with what open source projects, and how they can be used in libraries.

The biggest news in the software industry in recent months is open source. Every week in the technology news we can read about IBM or Oracle or Netscape or Corel announcing plans to release flagship products as open source or a version of these products that runs on an open source operating system such as Linux. In its defense against the Department of Justice, Microsoft has pointed to Linux and its growing market share as evidence that Microsoft cannot exert unfair monopoly power over the software industry. Dozens of new open source products along with regular news of upgrades, bug fixes, and innovative new features for these products are announced every day at web sites followed by thousands. -- Read More

Trouble with the OPAC

Have you ever seen an entire story devoted to an OPAC? Well Here\'s one from McCalls.com on the troubles with a new OPAC in Bucks County, PA. It seems the new system has more than a few bugs, enough to render it almost useless. $695,000 down the drain?

\"Taos went online in late December. It hardly has performed as expected -- instead of speeding up the search process, Taos has caused logjams at each of the system\'s seven branches. It has not been unusual for Taos to crash, Moody said, freezing the searches of everyone using a computer terminal to track down a book.\" -- Read More

SciNet

Richard Wayne writes \"SciNet (www.scinetcorp.com) from whom many of us bought CD servers, seems to be out of business. The URL still works, but the phones have been disconnected. \"

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