Technology

New Discussion List on Wireless and Libraries

Bill Drew writes \"I have started a new discussion group using Yahoo!Groups. The group is
Wireless and Libraries (LibWireless).
The purpose of this group is to discuss libraries and all types of wireless
technologies. This includes but is not limited to wireless LANs in
libraries, accessing library resources via wireless devices, and related
issues such as WLANs, wireless bookmobiles, etc. .\"


Read on for instructions...... -- Read More

The end of searching as we know it

Brian writes \"How will we find good information in \"the coming age of P2P\"?


Will a Doogle (distributed Google) arise? Will metadata come to the rescue?


These issues came up at a conference in San Francisco. Wired News has the Story .
\"

XML4Lib Electronic Discussion

An electronic discussion on XML and its use in libraries.


The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is now being used by libraries
for a variety of purposes. The purpose of this electronic discussion
is to assist library staff in learning about XML and how to apply it
to library problems and opportunities.


The discussion archive is browsable and (soon to be) searchable at
the XML4Lib web site.


TO SUBSCRIBE:
Send the mesage \"subscribe xml4lib YOUR NAME\" to
listserv@sunsite.berkeley.edu

This @!*# Computer!

Lois Fundis writes \"In the March issue of Consumer Reports is an article \"This @!*# Computer!\" which gives 10 tips for solving common computer problems.


(There are also reviews of new computers -- both Apple and PC -- in this issue but you need to subscribe to their website to access that article online. This costs $3.95 a month or $24 a year.)


The Consumer Reports article on filtering is now online, this article is aimed at parents considering using filters on their home computers, although it does have a sidebar specifically on the issue \"Should the government require filtering?\" (also Online ) dealing with the use of filters in schools and libraries. Between the two articles, CR points out many of the problems with filtering. They found that filters block as many as one of five \"harmless\" (in CR\'s own word) sites, but fail to block one of five sites that were objectionable. \"

The USA Today also covered this.

These Emerging Technologies Will Change Public Libraries

John Guscott, Editor of Library Futures Quarterly has written a Feature on crucial technologies that public library administrators, trustees, managers and professionals should be watching. He covers technologies like Information Devices, Language and Translation Software, Wireless Networking, and Information Management, to name just a few.

\"These new technologies will challenge libraries to address essential transformational issues including enhancing convenience and expediency, providing varying and overlapping information formats, extending operating hours and points-of-service, addressing permanency of materials, serving broader constituencies, managing costs of services and even testing the essential right to loan materials.\"

Engineering Our Own Library Catalog

Engineering Our Own Library Catalog is a nifty story from Infotoday on how the library and computing staff at Packer Engineering worked together to create an in-house customized online catalog.
It\'s interesting to see how they went about building an OPAC from the ground up.

Questia Q&A

Infotoday has an Interview with Questia president, and CEO, Troy Williams.


\"We do believe people who want to read that text will go into the library and borrow it. Second, we think it\'s going to increase patronage in a library. If the result of a full-text search identifies 12 books with specific, relevant paragraphs, then a student can go into a library with confidence.\"

Sales Tax Free PC Week May Narrow Info Gap

Because New York is lagging behind the rest of the country in the number of homes with computers, ranking 34th in the nation, legislators are expected to vote on whether to accept a proposal to allow PCs to be sold tax free for one week during the month of August.

According to Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno, \"Over the past decade, personal computers have become a necessity in the household and knowledge of computers and their use is now considered essential for anyone seeking to excel in an increasingly technology-based economy.\" This 8% reduction in total cost, combined with anticipated promotional offers from vendors would provide a hefty price break for many.

If passed, it is hoped that the $20 million proposal would boost computer sales as well as increase computer literacy. Included in the tax break would be desktops and laptops, printers, scanners, CD-ROM drivers and software. All items must be purchased in a single transaction along with the PC.

New York would be the second state to adopt such a strategy. Pennsylvania tried this same approach last year, causing computer sales to triple. No information is available yet on whether the measure improved the IT literacy rate in that state.

Alabama Virtual Library

Bonnie Lee sent in a story on the Alabama Virtual Library, a $3 million cooperative effort that brings online resources to schools.
This article from Infotoday.com provides an overview of the path they took to make this project a reality for Alabama, and spotlights the significant collaboration that was involved. It\'s quite an interesting and indepth how to guide on the entire process.

Drowning in Information

Jeanie writes:\"There is a short article in Smart Computing in Plain English V12 (3)
entitled Drowning in Information. Two professors from the Univ of
Calif/Berkeley released the results of a study designed to measure the
yearly production of new information in the US and the world. Findings:
Worldwide production of info equals 250 books of data for each man, women
and child on the planet. Other findings include 93% of all new data
produced in 199 was in digital format.\"

No Link for this one, though seems similar to This One or maybe This.

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