Technology

Computer passwords reveal secrets

ZDNet is running A Story on what our passwords say about us.

A recent study, run by CentralNic in The UK, questioned 1,200 office workers. About half of the people surveyed used a password that had to do with their family, a third of office workers used something they are a fan of.
How many of you have \"dewey\" or \"book\"?

Hi-tech manuscript preserves Middle Ages treasure

Charles Davis writes \"from
Ananova

Classical chart-toppers the Mediaeval Baebes have
unveiled a new digital version of one of the UK\'s most
important 15th century texts.
The Sherborne Missal, which is worth £15 million, is one of
the most important treasures from the late Middle Ages and
has been saved for the nation by the British Library.
Following a £1.45 million fund-raising drive, the British Library has successfully digitised part of the manuscript, making a large touch-screen version available to all visitors. \"

The Empire that was Russia - Exhibition

The Library of Congress has used digital imaging technology to restore to their former glory the photographs taken at the turn of the century by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky. The newly restored color photographs form the exhibition The Empire That Was Russia: the Prokudin-Gorsky Photographic Record Recreated. For more on this fascinating collection and work undertaken to restore it, see the full story from the International Herald Tribue.

Computer ready to Cyc people out

The L.A. Times reports that an artificial intelligence system called Cyc (short for "encyclopedia") will make its public debut later this summer. Cyc has been in development for 17 years, and it seems to be able to conduct reference interviews of sorts.

The full story also summarizes A.I. history. By the way, the developers have taught Cyc that killing is worse than lying, so we won\'t have a HAL on our hands.

CD Eating Fungus

Here\'s A Short story on a fungus that eats compact discs.

Nicholson Baker may have a bigger point than many had thought. They discovered a fungus in Belize that was steadily eating through the supposedly indestructible disc. The fungus had burrowed into the CD from the outer edge, then devoured the thin aluminium layer and some of the data-storing polycarbonate resin.

Nation\'s First 24-Hour Virtual Help Desk

The first of its kind in the nation, this 24-hour virtual help desk, located at the Cleveland Ohio Public Library, hopes to attract new clients. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch. To visit the virtual help desk, Click Here.

EInk Now In Colour

Slashdot told me about another cool story. This time NewScientist is running a Story on EInk. They say they have succeeded in making electronic paper work in full color. They say Laptops, palmtops and cellphones with rigid electronic paper screens will be on the market within the next two years.

Coming soon, eNewsPapers, eFoldUpBooks, ePaper?

See Also.

The Center for Studying Plagiarism

The Center for Studying PlagiarismThe goal of this web site is to help reduce the impact of plagiarism on education and educational institutions. At present, it distributes free software
to detect plagiarism and is gathering information on peoples’ experiences with plagiarism. The site’s author is Lou Bloomfield, Professor of Physics,
University of Virginia


Part One: Anonymous Survey of Personal Experiences with Plagiarism

Part Two: Software to detect plagiarism

Academic Libraries a Key Target and a Tough Sell

Today\'s Chronicle has a very good Look At the dicey relationship between academic libraries and all the new for-profit cybraries.

Professors are afraid they make it too easy for students to plagiarize and the sparten collections and impending dot-doom that hovers over them leaves academic librarians uneasy about using them.
This is the best look at this topic I\'ve read to date, check it out if this area is of interest.

\"Library users, he says, like being able to look online to see what an e-book offers. But many apparently looked only long enough to decide if it was worth walking to the library to do what students and professors have traditionally done -- check out a good, old-fashioned book\"

Emerging Technologies That Will Change Public Libraries

John Guscott says his report you may have seen here
before was updated on May
1 and has doubled in length.
Read the full report for an interesting look
into the future. They\'ve selected crucial technologies
that public library administrators, trustees, managers
and professionals should be watching.
Teleservice
Next Generation Online Publishing
Language and Translation Software
And several more.

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