Technology

NY Times Computers Shut Down by Apparent Hack Attack

From ZDNet,
First it was an Anthrax scare, now their network has apparently been hacked. Someone seems to be targeting the New York Times. According to the network administrator, \"We don\'t know that it was malicious, but there seems to be no innocent explanation.\" more...

The Challenges of D.I.Y. Circulation

From today\'s New York Times:

On a recent weekday evening, scores of work-weary people waited to check out materials at the Mid-Manhattan branch of the New York Public Library while, a few yards away, two self-service checkout machines stood idle.

Michael Dong of the Bronx approached one, but his attempt at do- it-yourself library clerking ended in an error message. \"Of all the times I\'ve tried it, it\'s worked once,\" said Mr. Dong of the machine as he abandoned it in exasperation.

He is not alone. For the past eight years, many libraries in the United States have invited people to step out of line and check out materials themselves. But library patrons have been less than enthusiastic about the devices, which have yet to live up to their manufacturers\' promise of becoming the book borrower\'s version of the automated teller.

More (registration required).

Tech Heavyweights Condemn SSSCA

The Security Systems Standards and Certification Act\'s prospects just got a bit dimmer:

After weeks of conference calls and quiet rallying of the troops, technology companies including Intel, IBM, Microsoft and Compaq Computer held a coming-out press conference Monday to oppose a broad copyright protection proposal being backed by Walt Disney and Sen. Ernest Hollings.

The plan has yet to be introduced as a bill, but it has been the source of intense debate since August, when drafts first began reaching the public. The technology companies\' event appeared to be aimed at pre-empting a Senate hearing on the issue scheduled for later this week.

\"This legislation would be an unwarranted intrusion by the government into the commercial marketplace,\" said Ken Kay, executive director of the Computer Systems Policy Project, a trade group that includes IBM, Intel, Dell Computer, Motorola and others as members. \"This would freeze technology...(and) force government to pick winners and losers.\"

More with thanks to Slashdot.

Internet Radios Aid Africa

Cavan McCarthy passed along This Interesting story from the BBC on Internet radios in Africa.

They have some kind of special radio connected to an adapter card in a Pentium computer, on the other end, the radio is connected to a detachable micro-dish receiver outside the window. It\'s currently operating in four countries - Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Ethiopia and is called Arid Lands Information Network - Eastern Africa (ALIN-EA)

I\'ve read about something similar here in the states on Slashdot.

The Electronic Paper Chase

Scientific Amercican has a Report on the latest and greatest in ePaper.

They talk of \"the last book\": several hundred bound pages of self-printing paper with a separate processor imprinted on each page and enough memory chips in the hardcover volume\'s spine to store the entire contents of the Library of Congress.

I like how new technologies are always able to \"Store the LOC\", microfilm, the web, ePaper....

The Open Source Movement

OSS4LIB pointed the way to This Article by Richard Poynder over on infotoday.com about Open Source projects, and more specifically, open source projects in libraries.

For anyone who does not know what we mean by \"Open Source\" this is a great introduction. He covers Library-Specific Projects
like Prospero, MARC.pm, and KOHA, the world\'s first open source public library system.

Weeding Made Easy as 1, 2, 3M

3M, using a component developed by Texas instruments, has created a new technology that will enable busy librarians
to weed their collections on the fly. Once programmed with items to be weeded, the new device will alert librarians directly from the stacks, when a scanner is moved over the book. Books that practically weed themselves. What a concept. more...

Sample pages at Amazon

Jenny Levine writes: \"Amazon has made some changes to the books section of their Web site that
allow you to view sample pages of titles. The home page highlights the new
\"Look Inside\" feature that is available for \"thousands of books\", including
childrens titles. For example, if you go to
Olivia Saves the Circus, you can view the back cover, an excerpt from
the book, the front & back flaps, and the intro pages (8 sample pages
total). Other titles let you view the table of contents, the index, and
more. The title \"Animal: The Definitive Visual Guide to the World\'s Wildlife\" includes 112 sample pages, and
this item hasn\'t even been published yet.
From a precursory glance, it looks like they are scanning in each page
and displaying them as standard images in the browser, which essentially
means they have their own digitizing project. At the top of each image is
the phrase \"Copyrighted material\", which is just another version of the
signs we put on our photocopy machines.


Looks like they scooped libraries again and are offering another service
that we should be integrating into our catalogs. How would we pull this
off?\"

Dublin Core Metadata Element Set Approved

Bethesda, Md., USA – (October 5, 2001) NISO, the National Information
Standards Organization and the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI)
announce the approval by ANSI of the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set
(Z39.85-2001). DCMI began in 1995 with an invitational workshop in Dublin,
Ohio that brought together librarians, digital library researchers, content
providers, and text-markup experts to improve discovery standards for
information resources. The original Dublin Core emerged as a small set of
descriptors that quickly drew global interest from a wide variety of
information providers in the arts, sciences, education, business, and
government sectors.


This standard is available for free downloading or hardcopy purchase at:
techstreet.com -- Read More

eMail Turns 30

Props to Slashdot for telling us eMail is now 30 years old!

Yahoo News has a nice Little Story, and Pretext.com has Another One. Check out w3history.org for a history of the Web or dejavu.org for another look at some interesting web history. Hobbes\' Internet Timeline covers the entire Internet, not just the webbie side of things.

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