Technology

The Promise of Software Libre (Open Source)

This week\'s Library
Juice
has a relatively long webliography on the Free
Software Movement
, with brief annotations. It\'s less
about the software itself and more about the
social/economic implications of the movement. I think
there\'s a natural match between librarians (\"content\") and
Free Software proponents (techne) for a way of doing
things in the information age that forms a viable
alternative to capitalist information practices.

Typographical Errors in Library Databases

Terry Ballard has written Typographical Errors in Library Databases.

This list started as a byproduct of a keyword inspection of the online catalog of Adelphi University in 1991. It\'s a huge a list of misspellings that are likely to be found in your OPAC. More recently, the whole subject was given a boost thanks to Phalbe Henriksen, library director of the Bradford County Public Library in Florida.

There is even a discussion list for librarians interested in this problem, Here.

Reading online libraries

CNET has a Commentary by Marti Harris on Ebrary and the other for-profit online libraries.

They say an e-library is one of those ideas too good to argue with and they believe that success in distributing to students content normally published by university and academic publishers--and the large-scale penetration of the e-learner market--requires a formal, contractual relationship with libraries.

There is a Spotlight Report from Gartner as well. The Key Issue covered: \"What information technologies will be effective in the delivery of academic services, and how will faculty use these technologies?\"

A surprising lesson in digital content

Someone writes \"ZDNET Story on a company named NewsStand that delivers a digital version of the NYTimes and other, advertisements, classified ads, stock market listings and TV programs and all.
They say this could even have some far-reaching second-level impact on the content market and It shows us that we still have a lot to learn from printed publications, and that \"pure\" information isn\'t everything.

\"

Local Places Global Connections

This Report [Local Places Global Connections: Libraries in the Digital Age] focuses on how libraries are coping with the use of new technologies to maintain their role as society\'s primary information providers, what challenges they are facing, and who is doing a good job.

\"The question, \"What will happen to libraries?\" has a larger context, for we as a nation find ourselves asking the same of universities, of public media, of religious institutions, and of government\'s social mandate. Each of these questions, in turn, derives from an even more basic question: \"How will Americans live their lives as citizens, as economic actors, and as social beings?\" These, after all, are the great questions of the twenty-first century, and they constitute our challenge. It is my fervent hope that when our distant descendants read the literature of the twenty-first century they will find references to libraries of the power of Shakespeare\'s and Jefferson\'s. Whether they will or not depends on our efforts today.\"

CD/DVD Impermanence and Expensive Solutions

Optical discs such as CDs and DVDs have a lifetime far too short for anything like \'permanent\' storage. While some folks are taking things to extremes with \'a micro-etched nickel disk with 2,000 year life expectancy\', archival libraries (and other interested folks) might want to look at Century Discs.

Prophets of The Computer Age

Part of the Flash Backs Archive at The Atlantic Monthly, Prophets Of The Computer Age highlights 2 excellent articles.

\"As We May Think\", is generally regarded by digerati as, if not the literal blueprint for the Net and the World Wide Web, then one of its germinal seeds.

\"The Computers of Tomorrow\" posits the possibility of an \"information utility,\" and raises the question of how government regulation might or might not play a role in this new market.

See Also: A Little History of the World Wide Web

Authorities Crack Huge Hacker Ring

From Microsoft\'s new Windows XP to the Harry Potter film, a group of hackers from all over the globe, made it easy for Net users to download software, movies, music, and books, all for free. The result has been an alleged $1 billion in lost revenue to some major corporations. It appears, however, that the gig is up. The piracy ring, which according to the article, was responsible for 95% of all illegal downloads, has been broken-up by authorities. More from BBC News.

State Removes Vital Stats from Web Site to Avoid Identity Fraud

Texas has decided to permanently remove vital statistics from it\'s state web site in order to avoid identity fraud. Although the move will make it more difficult for genealogists, the State\'s Department of Health isn\'t taking any chances. More

Technologists and Tinkerers

D. Scott Brandt has Technologists and Tinkerers in the Latest CIL.

He looks at how Computers, librarians, and tinkering have made a wonderful match.

\"I think tinkering comes naturally to librarians because technology comes naturally. Information as we know it is intimately integrated with technology. In fact, a lot of people even have a hard time separating the two! But for the most part, it\'s a good thing.\"

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