Technology

Six Canadian Universities to create giant online database

NationalPost.com is Reporting The Canadian federal government has given $2.6-million to six Canadian university libraries to create one of the world\'s largest online databases of old texts and archives. They say it\'s believed to be the largest single grant to a humanities project.

Called the Text Analysis Portal for Research, the libraries will combine their electronic databases, which include legal documents, stories in aboriginal languages, rare poetry, oral statements and Old English texts. The schools are University of Victoria, University of Alberta, McMaster University, Université de Montréal, University of Toronto and UNB.

The Grid: A New Infrastructure for 21st Century Science

\"Built on the Internet and the World Wide Web, the Grid is a new class of infrastructure. By providing scalable, secure, high-performance mechanisms for discovering and negotiating access to remote resources, the Grid promises to make it possible for scientific collaborations to share resources on an unprecedented scale, and for geographically distributed groups to work together in ways that were previously impossible.\"

I\'m sure there is an application for libraries somewhere in there. Full story.

Spotted at Metafilter.com.

the OSSNLibraries Portal

Presenting the OSSNLibraries Portal
The portal is \"a prototype of an open source software (OSS) in libraries portal -- a combination directory/webliography of OSS projects and information resources designed for and useful in library settings.
The Software section is a directory of OSS software browsable by a number of characteristics. The Webliography lists themes pertaining to OSS in libraries and zero or more links to Internet resources elaborating on the theme.\"

The Promise of Software Libre (Open Source)

This week\'s Library
Juice
has a relatively long webliography on the Free
Software Movement
, with brief annotations. It\'s less
about the software itself and more about the
social/economic implications of the movement. I think
there\'s a natural match between librarians (\"content\") and
Free Software proponents (techne) for a way of doing
things in the information age that forms a viable
alternative to capitalist information practices.

Typographical Errors in Library Databases

Terry Ballard has written Typographical Errors in Library Databases.

This list started as a byproduct of a keyword inspection of the online catalog of Adelphi University in 1991. It\'s a huge a list of misspellings that are likely to be found in your OPAC. More recently, the whole subject was given a boost thanks to Phalbe Henriksen, library director of the Bradford County Public Library in Florida.

There is even a discussion list for librarians interested in this problem, Here.

Reading online libraries

CNET has a Commentary by Marti Harris on Ebrary and the other for-profit online libraries.

They say an e-library is one of those ideas too good to argue with and they believe that success in distributing to students content normally published by university and academic publishers--and the large-scale penetration of the e-learner market--requires a formal, contractual relationship with libraries.

There is a Spotlight Report from Gartner as well. The Key Issue covered: \"What information technologies will be effective in the delivery of academic services, and how will faculty use these technologies?\"

A surprising lesson in digital content

Someone writes \"ZDNET Story on a company named NewsStand that delivers a digital version of the NYTimes and other, advertisements, classified ads, stock market listings and TV programs and all.
They say this could even have some far-reaching second-level impact on the content market and It shows us that we still have a lot to learn from printed publications, and that \"pure\" information isn\'t everything.

\"

Local Places Global Connections

This Report [Local Places Global Connections: Libraries in the Digital Age] focuses on how libraries are coping with the use of new technologies to maintain their role as society\'s primary information providers, what challenges they are facing, and who is doing a good job.

\"The question, \"What will happen to libraries?\" has a larger context, for we as a nation find ourselves asking the same of universities, of public media, of religious institutions, and of government\'s social mandate. Each of these questions, in turn, derives from an even more basic question: \"How will Americans live their lives as citizens, as economic actors, and as social beings?\" These, after all, are the great questions of the twenty-first century, and they constitute our challenge. It is my fervent hope that when our distant descendants read the literature of the twenty-first century they will find references to libraries of the power of Shakespeare\'s and Jefferson\'s. Whether they will or not depends on our efforts today.\"

CD/DVD Impermanence and Expensive Solutions

Optical discs such as CDs and DVDs have a lifetime far too short for anything like \'permanent\' storage. While some folks are taking things to extremes with \'a micro-etched nickel disk with 2,000 year life expectancy\', archival libraries (and other interested folks) might want to look at Century Discs.

Prophets of The Computer Age

Part of the Flash Backs Archive at The Atlantic Monthly, Prophets Of The Computer Age highlights 2 excellent articles.

\"As We May Think\", is generally regarded by digerati as, if not the literal blueprint for the Net and the World Wide Web, then one of its germinal seeds.

\"The Computers of Tomorrow\" posits the possibility of an \"information utility,\" and raises the question of how government regulation might or might not play a role in this new market.

See Also: A Little History of the World Wide Web

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