Technology

Voice over IP via WLANs

Voice Via WLANs on Horizon

September 29, 2003
By Carmen Nobel

With new products that support voice communication via WLANs, several companies are working toward the goal of having PDAs replace desktop phones.

Symbol Technologies Inc., which caters to vertical customers, has plans for several new devices that marry wireless LAN support with voice capabilities, according to officials at the Holtsville, N.Y., company.

The company plans to add voice support to several of its devices based on Microsoft Corp.'s Pocket PC operating system, as well as a product road map that includes Pocket PC devices designed to support voice over Wi-Fi, officials said.

Through channel partners, Symbol in December will start selling a software option called Voice Communicator that turns a handheld device, running Pocket PC, into a walkie-talkie.

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The Man Who Translates Alphabets to Computer Code

Steve Fesenmaier writes "For the World's A B C's, He Makes 1's and 0's [NY Times]. MICHAEL EVERSON, a 40-year-old typographer who lives in Dublin, considers himself blessed because he has found his life's work: to be an alphabetician to all the peoples of the world. Mr. Everson's largest project to date - a
contribution to a new version of Unicode 4.0, an international standard for computerizing text - is cementing his reputation.

"His mission has taken him to Kabul, Afghanistan, and Helsinki, Finland; to Beijing, Tokyo and Redmond, Wash. His Dublin
house is a shrine to his obsession with every writing system that humans are known to have created - 148 of which Mr. Everson
says he can use for writing his name. In the hallway is an icon of the saints Cyril and Methodius (Cyril is often credited with
inventing the Cyrillic alphabet) and a page from a Maghreb manuscript from North Africa."

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Wireless Security tips from PC Magazine

This article provides a good summary of best practices for WLAN security.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,4149,1276349,00.asp

Improving Wireless LAN Authentication: A Description of the Authentication in 802.1x Standard

white paper from RSA

Abstract: This article describes an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) mechanism for mutual authentication and session key generation in a roaming environment. The server authentication and the negotiation of the session key is done using the PPP EAP Transport Layer Security (TLS) authentication protocol. This user authenticates using a PPP EAP mechanism, integrity and privacy protected by TLS. In essence, a wrapping of EAP inside TLS inside EAP is specified. An important application discussed in this document is providing authentication of access points and stations within an IEEE 802.11 Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), but other applications such as Personal Area Network (PAN) access over Bluetooth might also be considered in the future.

Improving Wireless LAN Authentication: A Description of the Authentication in 802.1x Standard

white paper from RSA

Abstract: This article describes an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) mechanism for mutual authentication and session key generation in a roaming environment. The server authentication and the negotiation of the session key is done using the PPP EAP Transport Layer Security (TLS) authentication protocol. This user authenticates using a PPP EAP mechanism, integrity and privacy protected by TLS. In essence, a wrapping of EAP inside TLS inside EAP is specified. An important application discussed in this document is providing authentication of access points and stations within an IEEE 802.11 Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), but other applications such as Personal Area Network (PAN) access over Bluetooth might also be considered in the future.

UK Wants Libraries to Go Wi-Fi

If you haven't been following Bill Drew's Wireless Section you might be interested in This Short BBC Piece, spotted byGary Deane, that says the UK E-commerce minister's vision of Britain's broadband future includes wireless, high-speed broadband net access in libraries. "I want to see every public library in the UK have a wi-fi hotspot", he said. The minister said out of the £6 billion earmarked for e-government over the next three years, £1 billion of that would be pushed into ensuring Britons have increased broadband connectivity, particularly in rural areas.

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My name is **** and I'm a Systems Librarian

Sarah Johnson writes "The prolific Rachel Singer Gordon has written another interesting piece on the nature of systems librarianship, this time for LIBRES, an e-journal based in Australia. Overcoming the Systems Librarian Imposter Syndrome talks about the reasons why many systems librarians feel needlessly inadequate in their positions, particularly when compared to IT staff with a formal technical background."

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New WLAN Center at PC Magazine

"My So Called Wireless Life
Do you feel that way? Well now's the time to get real with wireless. Whether you're a wireless wannabe, or a war driving wizard, we've got loads of great content for you, starting today. Why? Because we're launching a Wireless Center on PCMag.com and rolling out the first of our eight-part weekly series on unwiring your life—starting with wirelessly enabling your home. So if you want to go wireless at home or on the go, or you want to improve the wireless you have, don't miss our special report." - Jim Louderback - ZDnet

Passwords multiply as users' rage rises

This One from The Baltimore Sun says in the digital age, people are on the verge of "password rage," frustrated with the abundance of codes they are required to memorize to secure their various networked devices. And the pressure to update the numerical and alphabetical soup keeps growing as threats of intrusions, cyberterrorism and identity theft increase.

"Our brains virtually have infinite capacity," says James L. McGaugh, director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the University of California at Irvine. "There's absolutely no problem with capacity. We do have problems with interference. If you're required to have eight characters with a combination of letters and numbers, and then you're asked to change that every few months - jeez, how do you remember all that? It's confusion."

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Computer dangers may be hard to find

Steve Fesenmaier writes "Things are a lot worse than most people imagine when it comes to worms, viruses, and other alien software on your computer...here's a NYT article about the Klez and other lurking insidious PC dangers.

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