Technology

15 tips for social media security in libraries

This is part Nine in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries.
Part 8 was the first half of this post, Social Media Security In Libraries
In Part 7 I listed many lists full of practical advice that covered just about everything dealing with IT security in libraries.
Part Six was really the first part of this post. I dealt with security in libraries, mostly theory, while this post is more practical, and is mostly lists.
In part 5 I covered 20 Common Security Myths, and how to defeat them.
Part 4 was a general "How To Stay Safe Online" post that covered topics like patching/updating, watching links and downloads, and using good passwords.
In Part Three I covered passwords.
In part 2 we talked privacy.
In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security.

It is important all users understand there are real threats posed by social media sites. I'm not trying to scare you into hiding in a cave here, but you should know places like Facebook and twitter are infected with bad guys who are working hard to cause trouble for all of us. Those bad guys will try to connect with as many people as possible, creating a sense of trust that makes it easier to use people to carry out their plans. Common schemes include things like social media identity theft, taking over of a brand's social media presence, phishing, viruses, worms, and just about any other common online risk. I've collected 15 common and easy tips to make your social media sites as secure as possible. -- Read More

What IT Professionals Can Learn from Librarians

What IT Professionals Can Learn from Librarians

If you think about a library, librarians are very techie but also very service oriented. Our librarians are exposed very intentionally, and have been for 15 years, to this intermingling of cultures. I’ve often said our help desk at the university would never be able to work for an uncaring IT help desk in the private sector. ... Librarians listen very well and will do anything to get an answer. The last thing they would say is, “I’m sorry. I’m going to send you a manual.” In libraries, the reference desk is very high on the status. It’s just the opposite in IT organizations. We have movement out of both, both laterally and vertically. It was a grand experiment that’s worked out very well.

Social Media Security In Libraries

This is part Eight in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries.
In Part 7 I listed many lists full of practical advice that covered just about everything dealing with IT security in libraries.
Part Six was really the first part of this post. I dealt with security in libraries, mostly theory, while this post is more practical, and is mostly lists.
In part 5 I covered 20 Common Security Myths, and how to defeat them.
Part 4 was a general "How To Stay Safe Online" post that covered topics like patching/updating, watching links and downloads, and using good passwords.
In Part Three I covered passwords.
In part 2 we talked privacy.
In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security.

Libraries and librarians are fully embracing social media sites like Twitter, LinkedIN and Facebook. Our libraries use them to connect with and engage our patrons, increase library visibility and communicate information. We each use them to connect with old friends, sell ourselves, stay up to date with the world around us, and keep in touch with family. There are serious security risks involved with most social sites that can be avoided by following some very simple rules. The bad guys are finding it very easy to use these sites to cause trouble. Scammers, stalkers, phishers, spammers, hackers and every other kind of evil doer on the internet are finding new ways to get into our social networks every day. They are using links to spread malware and spam, and they're always one step ahead. They're using it to fill social media sites with evil, e.g. chat bots, captcha crackers, malware, spam, control botnets, blackhat SEO, etc… -- Read More

Practical IT Security In Libraries

This is part Seven in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries.
Part Six was really the first part of this post. I dealt with security in libraries, mostly theory, while this post is more practical, and is mostly lists.
In part 5 I covered 20 Common Security Myths, and how to defeat them.
Part 4 was a general "How To Stay Safe Online" post that covered topics like patching/updating, watching links and downloads, and using good passwords.
In Part Three I covered passwords.
In part 2 we talked privacy.
In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security.

Let's face it, security is tough in libraries. We have no shortage of access points. We deal with any number of vendors, who may or may not be secure. Threats come from within the libraries (patrons), and from external sites anywhere in the world. Our patrons are bringing in all sorts of Wi-Fi enabled things. And any new security stuff we want to add will get push back from our coworkers, and cost money that's not in the budget. In this post I've created a bunch of random, though related, lists that can be used to help get started with security in your library. It's a follow up and companion to Integrating IT Security In Your Library and should help put some of that theory into practice. You probably won't need every point from every list, but I'm hoping presenting them in this way will save you time, and start you on the path to increasing security. I hope to expand each list into a full length post in the future. -- Read More

Reference Resources for the Budding Know-It-All

A full reference library will not fit on a phone, but several apps offer inexpensive and useful alternatives.

You could once gauge a family’s intellectual vitality by its living room bookshelves. If your family scored the trifecta of Encyclopedia Britannica, the Oxford English Dictionary and the World Almanac, you were ahead of the pack.

Software developers have not found a way to load an entire reference library onto your phone or tablet, and, alas, the O.E.D. doesn’t exist for mobile users. But you can get by with Britannica Concise Encyclopedia 2011 ($20 on Android and Apple), Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary ($25 on Apple and Android) and The World by National Geographic ($4 for the iPad).

Full story in the NYT

Integrating IT Security In Your Library

This is part Six in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries.
In part 5 I covered 20 Common Security Myths, and how to defeat them.
Part 4 was a general "How To Stay Safe Online" post that covered topics like patching/updating, watching links and downloads, and using good passwords.
In Part Three I covered passwords.
In part 2 we talked privacy.
In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security.

Today's post is long on theory. I'll argue that most any library can be a target, and present some ideas on how to make things more secure in your library. -- Read More

20 Common Security Myths

This is part five in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries. Part 4 was a general "How To Stay Safe Online" post that covered topics like patching/updating, watching links and downloads, and using good passwords. In Part Three I covered passwords. In part 2 we talked privacy. In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security.

Today's post is short and sweet, 20 myths I've run across while working on the series. I've tried to include a link on most of them that explains why something is wrong. -- Read More

Staying Safe Online

This is part four in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries. In Part Three I covered passwords. In part 2 we talked privacy. In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security.

Today's post is a big bunch of tips (in convenient list form) on how to keep yourself safe while surfing the web. A bundle of easy practical tips you can take anywhere to make your computers safer. This is a pretty long list that can be boiled down to three important bullet points: -- Read More

  • Keep everything patched and updated
  • Never trust anything
  • Use good passwords

The ILS the digital library and the research library

The ILS, the digital library and the research library. Great question from Lorcan Dempsey

" Responsibility for the integrated library system (or library management system) appears to be a part of each post, yet it is not foregrounded in the position description. For these libraries, maybe, the ILS is a necessary part of doing business, but is not the site of major development. Designing and developing digital infrastructure now includes the ILS but is no longer led by it. Or maybe there is some other reason .... ?"

Practical Advice On Choosing Good Passwords

This is Part Three in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries. In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security. Last time we talked privacy, and today it's passwords.

A comment on an LISNews post from last week asked me about passwords. It seems like such simple, obvious topic, but when you stop and think about it, passwords are difficult, and a good answer does indeed take 1,399 words.

Do you always use unique passwords? Are those passwords always "strong"? Does your library's web presence require strong passwords for all users? Do you have password recommendation clearly posted on your web resources for your users? What makes a good password? Are complex passwords the most secure? Is it uniqueness? Is length the most important thing in a password? I'll start by saying the single most important thing is uniqueness, never reuse a password on everything. -- Read More

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