Technology

Tools for Reducing and Managing Link Rot in LibGuides

The new issue of code4lib as a interesting article "Tools for Reducing and Managing Link Rot in LibGuides".

From abstract

"This article describes tools for managing links in SpringShare’s LibGuides, a popular web platform for libraries. LibGuides includes a built-in link checker for only some links. Instructions are provided on how to run an automated link checker on all links within a single guide. Persistent Uniform Resource Locators (PURLs), hyperlinks which are maintained centrally and rarely break, are recommended for library electronic resources. Special consideration is given to the fact that many libraries using the LibGuides platform may not have easy access to in-house information technology (IT) personnel. A method is presented for implementing PURLs entirely within the LibGuides platform."

The automated link checker suggested is Xenu Xenu Link Sleuth which is fairly well known though clear instructions are given.

The second part of the article using LibGuides “Redirect URL" feature coupled with "Friendly URL" feature is pretty clever though, allowing you to create a PURL using just Libguides.

Full article here

http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/7019

Aaron Tay

Nobody Wants A .library TLD

Reveal Day 13 June 2012 – New gTLD Applied-For Strings
ICANN developed the New generic Top-Level Domain Program to increase competition and choice by introducing new gTLDs into the Internet’s addressing system. What is a gTLD? It is an Internet domain name extension such as the familiar .com, .net, or .org. There are 280 ccTLDs but only 22 “generics” in the domain name system right now, but that is all about to change.

The new gTLD application window opened on 12 January 2012 and closed on 30 May 2012. The following list displays all of the gTLD strings that were applied for during this round.

How Twitter is putting an end to our private lives

Better Title:
How [People Are Using] Twitter [To] put an end to [Their Own] private lives

But is it really that clear? How do you know, for example, whether your own beliefs about privacy might go out of the window in the heat of an acrimonious split-up, or sexual boastfulness, or spurned humiliation? Say that you could swear on your life that you wouldn't spill the beans in public, no matter what.

Could you guarantee the same discretion on your partner's behalf?

[Thanks Derrick!]

Wasting Time Is New Divide in Digital Era

Article about how children in different economic classes use technology. Librarians may find this paragraph interesting: The new divide is such a cause of concern for the Federal Communications Commission that it is considering a proposal to spend $200 million to create a digital literacy corps. This group of hundreds, even thousands, of trainers would fan out to schools and libraries to teach productive uses of computers for parents, students and job seekers. Full article

Topic: 

With Social Media Every Old Complaint Is New Again

The Call of the Future
Now that telephones are virtually everywhere, observed The New York Times, “telephone manners are, quite naturally, becoming equally complicated.” The year was 1986 (when a few people had car phones but the mobile phone was not yet widely distributed). Strikingly, it could have been last week—or it could have been around 1900, when, the German critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin noted, the phone arrived in his Berlin household, with an “alarm signal that menaced not only my parents’ midday nap but the historical era that underwrote and enveloped this siesta.”

In the Digital Era, Publication Isn’t Preservation

From The Verge,
"As the publication world is dragged, kicking and screaming, into the digital world, a lot of complex issues come up. One of the most important, especially for librarians and archivists (not to mention students of history looking to the future), is the question of preservation...The problem, says Barbara Galletly reporting for Digital Book World, is that the foundation for such a transition has not been properly laid, digital preservation is a largely chaotic, random affair right now, and the metadata itself is unstable."

Libraries and the Myth of Mobile Phone Use

Libraries and the Myth of Mobile Phone Use

Our users don’t want most of the things we think they want. Even if you’re an old hand at user-centered design, they will surprise you. (I never saw using the search box to find a database coming.) Interview a variety of different users, and ask smart questions. Use the answers you get to build composite personas of different types of users. Whenever you are stumped about how to get past a design problem, go to your persona. That will help guide you to user-centered thinking.

An Inconvenient Truth About E-books

An Inconvenient Truth About E-books
As we rush headlong into e-books, we’re not considering how our libraries will migrate forward in time, protecting personal and institutional investments. Paper books are readable by anyone who’s literate, but e-books require a reader, and DRM ensures that there will be difficulties in the future. Worse, there are several different file formats and different DRMs used by Apple, Adobe and Amazon.
The net effect is that our collections have to be considered temporary and expendable at the whim of the retailers, and our ability to pass books on to heirs or colleagues becomes limited in a fashion that hinders human knowledge.”

Google vs. Bing - what's the difference?

Google vs. Bing - what's the difference?
And that's the biggest case against switching to Bing. If you're never really going to escape Google - and if Bing is pretty much exactly like Google - what's the point? Yes, Google and Bing are functionally identical. But Bing will need a lot more than parity with the most-popular search engine in the land if it wants people to switch en masse.

How is Google different from traditional Library OPACs & databases?

How is Google different from traditional Library OPACs & databases?
In short, the further away your library search is from these characteristics , the more difficult your users will find the search to use due to different expectations. Trained by Google, their searches are created based on the expectations such features are built-in , lacking any one of them will result in difficulties and poor quality results.

Of course implementing these features means losing control and predictability of searches, librarians don't want to be surprised and for sure they don't want to see a result they can't explain. Being able to do a precise controlled search would enable a searcher to be *sure* he has done a exhaustive search that he wants.

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