Theory

Print Vs. The Web

A funny thing happened the other day. Business 2.0
profiled one of the services the company I work for
offers. This included a screen shot of our web site, and
a nice review of our service. That wasn\'t the funny part.
The funny part was the reaction the article received
around the office. “Giddy” best summarizes the
responses of these 20 something dot.com employees
to having the web site they designed in a magazine.
Strange, considering it probably is viewed by more
people in a single day on the web, than will ever see it
in the magazine. But being in print made it some how
different, some how more worthy and important.
“Interesting”, I said to myself. “Perhaps the printed
word isn’t as dead as they say”.

Topic: 

An Historical Perspective on the Commodification of Information

Intellectual Property: An Historical Perspective on the Commodification of Information, by Darcy Sharman, a recent grad of the University of Alberta library school, presents a look at the development of commodified information from early beginnings to the technological present. It is an interesting paper that has relevence for the current practice of librarianship, because librarians make information available for free (with public or community funding) at a time when there is increasing pressure to view all information as a commodity.


The introduction is ahead:

Topic: 

Murdock\'s Lies and the Representation of Information

Murdock\'s Lies and the Representation of Information, by Australian professor Gordon Fletcher, takes a critical, postmodern view of the recent question, \"What is Information?\" Information Theory has encouraged us to look at information as something uniform, but this distracts us from what is actually represented by it. This paper looks at examples of information as artefacts, from a material culture perspective, and as stories, all with the point of providing insight into the social nature of what now circulates electronically in commodified form.


Go ahead for an excerpt from the conclusion:

Topic: 

Need for First Amendment Education

Kathleen writes "Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, First Lady of Pennsylvania has stated, "The only way to hold on to our freedom is to give it away -- and liberally -- to those who come after us. In your own sphere of influence, in your own way, I invite you to join with me and give back meaning to the word "citizen." Concerned by a recent study that demonstrates a decline in understandidng of the First Amendment, Judge Rendell advocates citizenship education.

“The Future of the First Amendment,� found that educators are failing to give high school students an appreciation of the First Amendment’s guarantees of free speech and a free press. The study by researchers from the University of Connecticut questioned more than 100,000 high school students, nearly 8,000 teachers, and more than 500 administrators and principals."

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