Young Adults

Mormon writers an emerging force in young adult literature

Mormon writers, many of them young women, who are surging into the genre of young adult literature, finding a happy marriage between the expectations of their religion and the desires of a burgeoning publishing niche.

The most famous among them, of course, is Stephenie Meyer, a practicing Mormon from Arizona whose Twilight series, about a teenage girl who has a no-sex-before-marriage relationship with a dreamy adolescent vampire...

She So Loved the Library She Left It Her Inheritance

The Baltimore Sun reports that Enoch Pratt Free Library officials happily discovered the esteem one of their retirees held for the place.

At her death, Sara (Bunny) Siebert directed that more than $650,000 of her assets go to the library, a figure that exceeds the total of all the paychecks she took home in her 34 years as Pratt's director of young adult reading. She died at age 88 last year.

Siebert, an energetic and popular librarian who sought no attention as a donor during her life, left an estate of more than $2 million.

Having no survivors, she divided her assets among the Baltimore institutions she admired including the Pratt Library and her alma mater, Goucher College.

Youth Librarians Kate McClelland and Kathy Krasniewicz

Since the first publicly-funded library opened in the USA in 1833, many generations of children have been inspired and nurtured by local librarians - none more so than the two generations of children in Old Greenwich, Connecticut who have had the privilege to be members of the Young Critics' Club at Perrot Memorial Library.

Full discussion at BookBrowse. Entry contains a link to an interview with Kate McClelland.

Alexie Book Still Spended from Crook Cty Classrooms But Available in the Library

Sherman Alexie's “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” is still under suspension by the Crook County (OR) School Libraries. A parent of a 14-year old objected to a description of masturbation in the award-winning YA book (like 14 year-olds don't already know?)

About 60 people turned out Monday night to the Crook County School Board meeting and about 15 testified about the book. The board then voted 4-1 to continue the temporary suspension, while making the book available to students in the library. School Board Chairman Jeff Landaker was the lone vote against the motion to suspend and wait for further review.

“The reason I voted no is because this issue has already taken one month’s time,” Landaker said. “And it’s at a time when, in my opinion, we have more critical issues facing us. We have a financial situation where we’ve had to cut 10 days off the school year and are facing a million-dollar budget shortfall next year. Now, it’s going to take two month’s time to address this, and I think we need to move on.”

Report from the Bend Bulletin.

Salinas Turning To Libraries to Prevent Gang Violence

SALINAS, Calif. -- With one shooting already in the books for the New Year, the city of Salinas is now turning to libraries in hopes of curbing gang violence.

For more than a year, library director Elizabeth Martinez has led the literacy campaign, which has already handed out 30,000 library cards. "We are astonished by the response of the community, people who want help for their families,” Martinez said. In fact, 65,000 Salinas residents own a library card, which is 45 percent of the population – twice the national average.

Mayor Donohue of Salinas is pushing a literacy campaign that would make the city the first in the country to require every student to have a library card.

“The libraries are really one of our best weapons on the prevention side to make sure we get as many young people out to the right start in life," Donohue said.

Teen Librarian Goes the Distance for Young Adult Readers

"It was crunchy on the outside and chewy on the inside," she said. "They take the stinger out, because they're poisonous."

What's that? A scorpion, encased in a lolipop, gladly eaten by Aubri Keleman, teen services and web coordinator for the Whatcom (WA) County Library System.

What led to the downing of the crunchy/chewy scorpion? Read all about it in the Bellingham Herald.

An Unconventional Teen Librarian

Librarianship is not always a first career.

Take the career of Gayle Morrow, a 59-year old rollerblading teen librarian. After working as a teacher and accountant, Morrow found herself unemployed and decided to go to school in her hometown of Philadelphia.

When the John F. Kennedy Library in Vallejo (CA) was hiring a young adult librarian, she decided to give that line of work a try. For her, this latest career has been "so much fun."

She dedicates her days to creating fun activities to draw city youth to the library. Her love of not only the library but the teens she works with is evident. "They keep you young. I love the way they think. It's fun to be around them," she said.

Working with the teens has taught her a lot about young people, she said. "They're what adults would like to be. They're open. They're honest. They accept people for what they are," she said, apparently including herself. Times Herald Online.

Empty Shelves, Filled With Imagination

WHEN Geri Ellner began her job this school year as the librarian — or in the current parlance, as a library media specialist — at the Brooklyn Collegiate, a public school for Grades 6 through 12 in Ocean Hill, Brownsville Brooklyn, she did not have much of a book collection.

Many of the shelves in the small library, illuminated by harsh fluorescent lights, were bare, and many books were outdated or not particularly age-appropriate, like a children’s volume titled “Now We Are Six.” For the children's books, she created a section entitled Memory Lane.

So Ms. Ellner, who has been working in the school library system for 10 years, did what she could to improve the library with a limited book budget of $3,244 for the school year. New York Times.

Minors may face limits at San Diego libraries

San Diego County libraries might soon allow parents to answer that question as officials look at changing the library card application for patrons under age 18.
A new proposal pushed by county Supervisor Bill Horn would require parents to mark a box indicating whether their child could check out R-rated DVDs and videos from the county's 33 libraries. The policy now allows patrons of all ages access to all library materials.

One Teens' Opinion on Libraries

...from LA Youth, "the newspaper by and about teens". She goes from absolutely hating libraries to proclaiming 'libraries rule'.

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