Young Adults

Keeping Up With Teens at the New Potter Movie

Anastasia posts on Y Pulse Blog: "At 37, apart from the sprinkling of parents accompanying their teens, I think we may have been the oldest people in the theater. My husband seemed proud that he stayed awake while the pierced, teen guy sitting next to him crashed midway through the movie. I would say the average age of the audience was 16-17 — "Harry Potter teens" — who have, like the stars of the films, grown up reading the books and watching the movies.

In a way I was jealous of these teens for having such a beloved series of books and being able to experience them on so many platforms — the movies, online fan communities and next year, the amusement park. Even though I read fantasy as a teen (A Wrinkle In Time, The Hobbit), there was no well-oiled multi-media/multi-platform machine in place to create a universe on the scale of Harry Potter. -- Read More

No Spitting @ Your Library

The unfortunate incident reported by Leigh Reporter (Southern Lancashire UK).

Teens Not Into Twitter, TV, Radio, or Newspapers

Interesting story at Read Write Web on teens and what they are into these days. Begs the question on how best to serve this demographic.

"Matthew Robson, a 15-year-old intern at analyst firm Morgan Stanley recently helped compile a report about teenage media habits. Overnight, his findings have become a sensation...which goes to show that people are either obsessed with what "the kids" are into or there's a distinctive lack of research being done on this demographics' media use. Robson's report isn't even based on any sort of statistical analysis, just good ol' fashioned teenage honesty. And what was it that he said to cause all this attention? Only that teens aren't into traditional media (think TV, radio, newspapers) and yet they're eschewing some new media, too, including sites like Twitter."

PBS Creates Library of Digital Resources Targeted to Classroom Use

PBS Creates Library of Digital Resources Targeted to Classroom Use

"In an effort to make its vast collection of digital educational resources available for in-class use, PBS has announced the launch of the PBS Digital Learning Library, a comprehensive source of digital video, still images, audio, games, and interactive simulations for teachers to use to augment their lessons. PBS made the announcement at last week's National Education Computing Conference (NECC) in Washington, DC."

Read the full article at:

PBS Creates Library of Digital Resources Targeted to Classroom Use

See also:

"Today, a number of local PBS stations are offering digital education services featuring public media content, such as Teachers Domain and Thinkport."

Introducing the PBS Digital Learning Library

Teachersdomain

Engineering

The Joys of Duct Tape Crafts

It's summer, and time for...duct tape?

Duct tape, the go-to tool of fixer-uppers everywhere. Created in the 1940s to keep moisture out of ammunition cases, duct tape has spawned an almost cult-like following. From television to fashion to art, duct tape has leapt out of the tool box and into international pop culture.

The PennLive article continues: The Hummelstown (PA) Community Library will sponsor "Got Duct Tape?" at 6 p.m. July 28 for students ages 12 to 18. Participants can use duct tape to make such items as wallets, purses, belts and flip flops. Duct-tape belts? Ouch. "Duct tape comes in so many different colors and designs. There's neon and even camouflage," said Ellen Miller, youth services librarian.

"There are Web sites that only talk about the joy of duct tape. Some of the projects are pretty bizarre. We won't be passing those along."

What? Not sharing information? What are these websites of which they speak? Is this one? And does your library use duct tape in crafts? Tell us more...

The why of the Rye

The BBC Magazine takes a look at the enduring popularity of J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye.

"Fans of the novel regard it as the defining work on what it is like to be a teenager. Holden is at various times disaffected, disgruntled, alienated, isolated, directionless, and sarcastic.

The book's publication in 1951 came at the dawn of the age of the teenager. A new social category, newly economically empowered and hungry for culture, was fed by music, films and novels."

Tennessee Schools Sued for Blocking GLBT Sites

A media specialist and several high school students are suing two school districts in Tennessee for unconstitutionally blocking access to online information about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) issues.

Librarian Karyn Stort-Brinks, students Keila Franks and Emily Logan, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee against the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools and Knox County Schools. Franks and Logan attend Hume-Fogg High School in Nashville. Knox News reports.

Ten libraries receive gaming and literacy grants

ALA announced the winners of the $5,000 gaming grants. Drumroll please....

  • Anderson Public Library, Anderson, Ind.
  • Brewster Ladies Library, Brewster, Mass.
  • Cascade Middle School, Auburn, Wash.
  • Henshaw Middle School Library, Anchorage School District, Anchorage, Alaska
  • Indian Trails Public Library, Wheeling, Ill.
  • Manhattanville College Library, Purchase, N.Y.
  • San Pablo Library, San Pablo, Calif.
  • Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley, Pa.
  • Wayne Country Public Library, Goldsboro, N.C.
  • Weber Country Library System, Ogden, Utah

The winners, representing a broad spectrum of libraries – seven public, two school and one academic – will use the funds to develop and implement gaming and literacy programs that provide innovative gaming experiences for youths 10-18 years of age. The 10 libraries were selected out of 390 that applied for the grant.

Santa Cruz Library Concerned About Kids Being Downtown

SANTA CRUZ -- As library leaders consider shifting their young adult collection from a small Westside branch to downtown's flagship to help close a $1 million deficit, patrons are wondering if downtown is the safest place for kids and families to hang out.

"Last week I had to go downtown and my bike seat was stolen," said Laura Young-Hinck, 38, who spends Monday afternoons at the Westside's Garfield Park Library with her daughter Ruby, 3, and their Chihuahua, Amelia. At Garfield Park, "it feels a lot safer than the downtown library," Young-Hinck said.

On May 11, members of the city-county library system's Joint Powers Board will consider whether to move Garfield Park's extensive young adult collection to the Central Branch on Church Street as part of a larger effort to save $1 million in the system's $12 million budget. The genealogy collection, which is downtown and staffed by volunteers, would move to Garfield Park.

Bronx Middle School Teacher (Didn't) Plant a Bomb at the Library, but Said He Did

A Bronx educational building that houses three public middle schools with about 1,200 students was evacuated by the authorities around 8:30 a.m. Friday after a disgruntled computer teacher claimed to have planted a bomb in the library — a claim that officials said turned out to be false.

The Police Department dispatched officers, hostage negotiators and bomb squad technicians to the scene, after the teacher, Francisco Garabitos, 55, evidently angry about being reassigned because of a disciplinary proceeding, made the threat, the authorities said. The teacher, a union chapter chairman at the school, barricaded himself inside a computer lab, but he surrendered to the authorities around 11:15 a.m.

Syndicate content