Young Adults

The Joys of Duct Tape Crafts

It's summer, and time for...duct tape?

Duct tape, the go-to tool of fixer-uppers everywhere. Created in the 1940s to keep moisture out of ammunition cases, duct tape has spawned an almost cult-like following. From television to fashion to art, duct tape has leapt out of the tool box and into international pop culture.

The PennLive article continues: The Hummelstown (PA) Community Library will sponsor "Got Duct Tape?" at 6 p.m. July 28 for students ages 12 to 18. Participants can use duct tape to make such items as wallets, purses, belts and flip flops. Duct-tape belts? Ouch. "Duct tape comes in so many different colors and designs. There's neon and even camouflage," said Ellen Miller, youth services librarian.

"There are Web sites that only talk about the joy of duct tape. Some of the projects are pretty bizarre. We won't be passing those along."

What? Not sharing information? What are these websites of which they speak? Is this one? And does your library use duct tape in crafts? Tell us more...

The why of the Rye

The BBC Magazine takes a look at the enduring popularity of J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye.

"Fans of the novel regard it as the defining work on what it is like to be a teenager. Holden is at various times disaffected, disgruntled, alienated, isolated, directionless, and sarcastic.

The book's publication in 1951 came at the dawn of the age of the teenager. A new social category, newly economically empowered and hungry for culture, was fed by music, films and novels."

Tennessee Schools Sued for Blocking GLBT Sites

A media specialist and several high school students are suing two school districts in Tennessee for unconstitutionally blocking access to online information about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) issues.

Librarian Karyn Stort-Brinks, students Keila Franks and Emily Logan, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee against the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools and Knox County Schools. Franks and Logan attend Hume-Fogg High School in Nashville. Knox News reports.

Ten libraries receive gaming and literacy grants

ALA announced the winners of the $5,000 gaming grants. Drumroll please....

  • Anderson Public Library, Anderson, Ind.
  • Brewster Ladies Library, Brewster, Mass.
  • Cascade Middle School, Auburn, Wash.
  • Henshaw Middle School Library, Anchorage School District, Anchorage, Alaska
  • Indian Trails Public Library, Wheeling, Ill.
  • Manhattanville College Library, Purchase, N.Y.
  • San Pablo Library, San Pablo, Calif.
  • Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley, Pa.
  • Wayne Country Public Library, Goldsboro, N.C.
  • Weber Country Library System, Ogden, Utah

The winners, representing a broad spectrum of libraries – seven public, two school and one academic – will use the funds to develop and implement gaming and literacy programs that provide innovative gaming experiences for youths 10-18 years of age. The 10 libraries were selected out of 390 that applied for the grant.

Santa Cruz Library Concerned About Kids Being Downtown

SANTA CRUZ -- As library leaders consider shifting their young adult collection from a small Westside branch to downtown's flagship to help close a $1 million deficit, patrons are wondering if downtown is the safest place for kids and families to hang out.

"Last week I had to go downtown and my bike seat was stolen," said Laura Young-Hinck, 38, who spends Monday afternoons at the Westside's Garfield Park Library with her daughter Ruby, 3, and their Chihuahua, Amelia. At Garfield Park, "it feels a lot safer than the downtown library," Young-Hinck said.

On May 11, members of the city-county library system's Joint Powers Board will consider whether to move Garfield Park's extensive young adult collection to the Central Branch on Church Street as part of a larger effort to save $1 million in the system's $12 million budget. The genealogy collection, which is downtown and staffed by volunteers, would move to Garfield Park.

Bronx Middle School Teacher (Didn't) Plant a Bomb at the Library, but Said He Did

A Bronx educational building that houses three public middle schools with about 1,200 students was evacuated by the authorities around 8:30 a.m. Friday after a disgruntled computer teacher claimed to have planted a bomb in the library — a claim that officials said turned out to be false.

The Police Department dispatched officers, hostage negotiators and bomb squad technicians to the scene, after the teacher, Francisco Garabitos, 55, evidently angry about being reassigned because of a disciplinary proceeding, made the threat, the authorities said. The teacher, a union chapter chairman at the school, barricaded himself inside a computer lab, but he surrendered to the authorities around 11:15 a.m.

Iowa Students Pass On the Love of Reading

First-graders at Riverside (IA) Elementary are getting a little help in developing a love for reading.

The industrial manufacturing class at Highland High, along with sixth-graders at Highland Middle School, donated bookshelves and books they each made in class to the 37 first-graders. They presented the gifts at an assembly at the school Friday morning.

Each of the first-grade students received their own small bookshelf made by the high school students and a book written and published by the sixth-graders to take home. Great idea, story from the Iowa Press Citizen.

Mormon writers an emerging force in young adult literature

Mormon writers, many of them young women, who are surging into the genre of young adult literature, finding a happy marriage between the expectations of their religion and the desires of a burgeoning publishing niche.

The most famous among them, of course, is Stephenie Meyer, a practicing Mormon from Arizona whose Twilight series, about a teenage girl who has a no-sex-before-marriage relationship with a dreamy adolescent vampire...

She So Loved the Library She Left It Her Inheritance

The Baltimore Sun reports that Enoch Pratt Free Library officials happily discovered the esteem one of their retirees held for the place.

At her death, Sara (Bunny) Siebert directed that more than $650,000 of her assets go to the library, a figure that exceeds the total of all the paychecks she took home in her 34 years as Pratt's director of young adult reading. She died at age 88 last year.

Siebert, an energetic and popular librarian who sought no attention as a donor during her life, left an estate of more than $2 million.

Having no survivors, she divided her assets among the Baltimore institutions she admired including the Pratt Library and her alma mater, Goucher College.

Youth Librarians Kate McClelland and Kathy Krasniewicz

Since the first publicly-funded library opened in the USA in 1833, many generations of children have been inspired and nurtured by local librarians - none more so than the two generations of children in Old Greenwich, Connecticut who have had the privilege to be members of the Young Critics' Club at Perrot Memorial Library.

Full discussion at BookBrowse. Entry contains a link to an interview with Kate McClelland.

Syndicate content