Young Adults

book kept on the shelf at school

A story out of OH, on the fight over a book.

A book about the devil, demons, the underworld, and the occult is never again going to leave Northwood High School.

In a compromise with two parents who wanted the book removed altogether, school board members have decided to prohibit students from taking the book from the library.

\"They were concerned about students taking it home to use without supervision,\" James Herr holtz, principal, said. \"Now it is to be a reference book, and I think it was a win-win situation.\"
\"I wanted the book out, but I felt that was the most I was going to get,\" Mrs. Richardson added. \"It could be a stepping stone for pursuing more information like this and with all the violence that is going on, we have to realize how influential [children] are.\" -- Read More

Tech-savvy teens still read books

A Shocking Report from the Chicago Sun Times. Teens actually READ!

In 1990, there were 66,268 books in print in the children\'s division, including young adult titles, she said. In 1998, that number soared to 130,850.

Middle school and high school students are being drawn to books that are filled with graphics and different typefaces. The books are designed to appeal to teens familiar with Web sites and computer games, say experts on teens and reading.

\"I like his writing,\" Michael said of Shakespeare. \"I just think it\'s cool.\"
Teens say they love to read about how their peers handle problems. -- Read More

Baltimore County School Eye Library Holdings

Della Curtis writes
\"Baltimore County Public Schools, the 24th largest school
district in the nation, is addressing the problem of aging
secondary school library collections. This is a problem
across the nation. Superintendent Anthony Marchione has
proposed spending 10 million over a 3-year period that will
outfit libraries with new books to support student research
and reading. The budget proposal was approved by the
Board of Education, and is now before the Baltimore County
Council.

Cella Curtis, Coordinator of the Office of Library
Information Services, has prepared a website that gives
insight as to the scope of the collection problem, the
process used to evaluate the collections in 165 schools, how
libraries contributed to academic achievement of students,
comments from students, staff, and parents, and links to
news articles in the Baltimore SunPapers and the Washington
Post. The overall intent of the website is to inform
the community and advocate school libraries and the
re-building of their library collections. The web address
is
http://www.
bcpl.net/~dcurtis/libraryfacts

Other school libraries who face the same problem may find

School Gets New Look for Library

From the L.A. Times.

The Cohasset Elementary School in Van Nuys is the latest to
receive a state-of-the-art library from the Wonder of
Reading, a nonprofit group that renovates Los Angeles
Unified School District libraries.

New green and gray carpeting, a reading amphitheater and
$10,000 worth of new biographies, science books and books in
Braille are just some of the changes from the four-week
make

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