Young Adults

Student Newspapers and Censorship

Lee Hadden Writes:

An article in the Washington Post shows that many high school students
who have articles censored in their student newspapers, are then posting
their items on the internet from their home computer. This avoids the
regulations that schools place on budding reporters, but has its own
problems as well. Many parents and teachers remember the diatribes posted
by the students from Columbine HS school shortly before their shooting
rampage. Also, problems of teen angst, accountability and slander remain.

Banality on the web

The Christian Science Monitor has a Story on the troubling trend towards simple minded garbage on the net. What is needed, advocates say, is material that is more sophisticated in combining education and entertainment, is increasingly interactive, and involves teens themselves in its creation.

\"Not everyone agrees that there\'s a dearth of good content, however. David Kleeman of the American Center for Children and Media sees lots of high-quality Web sites, games, and interactive content emerging. He says one of the biggest obstacles is simply making children and parents aware of the quality content that is available online.\" -- Read More

Childrens Trivia Quiz

Bruce Flanders wrote:
Just for the fun of it, here\'s a trivia quiz for you. They
aren\'t too tough, but see how many you can get. This is reproduced from our
library staff newsletter, and was created by the newsletter\'s editor Maria
Butler.

\"The following are first lines from classic children\'s books. See how many
you can identify, by title and author. -- Read More

The Mystery and the Act

Originally published in Library Juice, this article by Teri Weesner has found its way to the Progressive Librarian web site. The article is called \"The Mystery and the Act: Toward a YA Human Sexuality Collection\" and it discusses the needs that teens have for accurate, honest information about sex and sexuality, and how librarians can meet that need.


\"This editorial is based on the premise that there is a connection between young people accessing porn via the internet and their innate curiosity about human sexuality and their own bodies. Young people viewing internet porn have an information need that can be addressed by youth services librarians and library collections. To ignore this information need is just as inaccurate and inappropriate as young people gleaning their information from internet pornography and cybersex chat. Young people\'s information needs are legitimate and the response of shaming from librarians is an ineffective tool for teaching, learning or discipline.\" -- Read More

R-Rated movies for all

CNN.com has this article on R rated movies being checked out by young kids. Who is responisble, the parents or the library?\"David Walsh, president of the National Institute on Media and the Family, called it \"a little bit of a curious situation where the local video store may actually have more family friendly policies than the local library.\" -- Read More

Kids and Web Searching

Brian writes \"At the 6th Conference on Human Factors and the Web last week, some researchers delivered a paper called, \"When Kids Use the Web: A Naturalistic Comparison of Children\'s Navigation Behavior and Subjective Preferences on Two WWW Sites.\"


Although the study used a small group of subjects (eight 12yo\'s and eight 16yo\'s) and was limited to fact-finding activities on only two websites, it does seem like it may have some useful information for librarians who either design the youth services areas of their institutions\' sites or train tweens and teens to do research on the Web.
Read more at :
pantos.org
\"

How to put words into childrens blood

The Globe and Mail, To mark International Children\'s Book Day, asked celebrated author Tim Wynne-Jones
for tips on feeding the reading gene.

\"

How do you put words into your children\'s blood? Talk to them. Read to them. Not just their books but delightful passages from yours, from magazines, from the newspaper. Keep reading to kids until they close the door on you. Then whisper through the key-hole that sprag isn\'t really an adjective, it\'s a chock or a steel bar used to prevent a car from running backwards on an incline, but it could describe a mountain bike if you wanted it to. Take every opportunity to lower the bucket into the well. Be the well. Give your kid an education mazuma can\'t buy. \" -- Read More

Partnership links home with library

Bob Cox sent in a A Story on partnerships from the Detroit News.

Project PULSE -- Partnerships Uniting Libraries and Schools Electronically -- is a federal education project that provides money to participating libraries. Teachers start off by designing a personalized Web site. The second phase of the program will allow youngsters to talk to each other with their computers about assignments.
Canton library Director Jean Tabor said Project PULSE \"raises the awareness of our library system.
\"We think this is the next phase of technology,\" she said. -- Read More

how to draw Satan book pulled

This Story from the Las Vegas Sun.


\"Draw 50 Monsters,\" written by Lee J. Ames and published by Doubleday, was checked out of the public school\'s library by a student this week.

A local elementary school is being criticized by a Christian pastor for having a library book that teaches students to sketch caricatures of the devil.

The principal of Joseph Neal Elementary School removed the book from the school\'s shelves Thursday, pending review by the library committee.

And while the complaint is primarily based on religion, the controversy is further exacerbated by a culture of fear and confusion about school violence. -- Read More

New library has only a handful of books

The Miami Herald reports on the lack of books at a local library.


A new library has been built at Carol City Elementary after three years of construction. But it is missing one important component: books.

The Carol City Elementary School Parent Teacher Association said in a press release that bookshelves at the new library ``stand 80 to 90 percent empty.\'\'

``The library\'s lack of materials is so stark as to be shocking for anyone entering for the first time,\'\' the PTA said.

The group is holding an emergency meeting at the school at 7 tonight to plan strategy for getting books into the library. -- Read More

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