Young Adults

Responsibility for the children

Mary Ann Meyers has written an excellent piece on
childrens privacy.

\"Last Thursday I posted a response to Rory
Litwin\'s \"Editor\'s Note\" in
the current issue of *Library Juice*.
writing about intellectual freedom Rory posed
questions about \"freedom
from information.\" His insights provoked a response
from me, in part,
about the question of the rights of children. In addition,
because of
recent PubLib discussions about visual sex in libraries
and about the
ALA wrestler poster, I have been thinking about the
library profession\'s
stance (if any) on the differences (if any) between
textual and
graphical information. So I was glad to see this posting
about PamForce\'s article on

She goes on to share her ideas on
children\'s privacy, and responds to the original article
by Pam Force.


Teachers Question Critical Study of Classroom Computers

NY Times has a Story on a new study underwritten by the Alliance for Childhood-- \"Fools Gold: A Critical Look at Computers in Childhood\" – says there is not enough research into the impact computers could have on the developing minds and bodies of young children. Not suprisingly, teachers are not too happy about the study.

\"With some kids, it\'s a way for them to get excited and learn,\" said Beth Lang who teaches second and third grades at Lakewood Elementary School in Overland Park, Kansas. \"To me, it\'s just like a book. It\'s such a part of our everyday use.\"

One of the Alliance for Childhood\'s objectives :\"To reduce children\'s growing dependance on electronic media\". Is that an indication of bias?


Board Members Drop Insurance to Buy Library

I Almost started to cry after reading This One from the Fresnobee. In Fresno County, CA school board members have done \"a very noble thing.\" They voluntarily dropped the health insurance they got as a benefit and pumped it into a new school library. These folks deserve a medal. What has your shool board done for you lately?

\"\"We all knew there was a need,\" says board president Lupe Zuniga. \"We couldn\'t figure out why no one ever figured this out before.\"


Children\'s Privacy in the Library

Pam Force wrote a fantastic in-depth look at childrens privacy concerns in the library.

How do we define privacy? And what are the problems behind the complex issue of children\'s privacy in the library? Privacy can be defined as the ability to control information about one\'s self. Respecting the privacy of others is tantamount to accepting others as members of the human race. Once gaining privacy was as simple as closing the curtains, but no longer. The internet has made the issue of privacy a very personal one for every individual, not just those who use it.


Student Newspapers and Censorship

Lee Hadden Writes:

An article in the Washington Post shows that many high school students
who have articles censored in their student newspapers, are then posting
their items on the internet from their home computer. This avoids the
regulations that schools place on budding reporters, but has its own
problems as well. Many parents and teachers remember the diatribes posted
by the students from Columbine HS school shortly before their shooting
rampage. Also, problems of teen angst, accountability and slander remain.


Banality on the web

The Christian Science Monitor has a Story on the troubling trend towards simple minded garbage on the net. What is needed, advocates say, is material that is more sophisticated in combining education and entertainment, is increasingly interactive, and involves teens themselves in its creation.

\"Not everyone agrees that there\'s a dearth of good content, however. David Kleeman of the American Center for Children and Media sees lots of high-quality Web sites, games, and interactive content emerging. He says one of the biggest obstacles is simply making children and parents aware of the quality content that is available online.\"


Childrens Trivia Quiz

Bruce Flanders wrote:
Just for the fun of it, here\'s a trivia quiz for you. They
aren\'t too tough, but see how many you can get. This is reproduced from our
library staff newsletter, and was created by the newsletter\'s editor Maria

\"The following are first lines from classic children\'s books. See how many
you can identify, by title and author.


The Mystery and the Act

Originally published in Library Juice, this article by Teri Weesner has found its way to the Progressive Librarian web site. The article is called \"The Mystery and the Act: Toward a YA Human Sexuality Collection\" and it discusses the needs that teens have for accurate, honest information about sex and sexuality, and how librarians can meet that need.

\"This editorial is based on the premise that there is a connection between young people accessing porn via the internet and their innate curiosity about human sexuality and their own bodies. Young people viewing internet porn have an information need that can be addressed by youth services librarians and library collections. To ignore this information need is just as inaccurate and inappropriate as young people gleaning their information from internet pornography and cybersex chat. Young people\'s information needs are legitimate and the response of shaming from librarians is an ineffective tool for teaching, learning or discipline.\"


R-Rated movies for all has this article on R rated movies being checked out by young kids. Who is responisble, the parents or the library?\"David Walsh, president of the National Institute on Media and the Family, called it \"a little bit of a curious situation where the local video store may actually have more family friendly policies than the local library.\"


Kids and Web Searching

Brian writes \"At the 6th Conference on Human Factors and the Web last week, some researchers delivered a paper called, \"When Kids Use the Web: A Naturalistic Comparison of Children\'s Navigation Behavior and Subjective Preferences on Two WWW Sites.\"

Although the study used a small group of subjects (eight 12yo\'s and eight 16yo\'s) and was limited to fact-finding activities on only two websites, it does seem like it may have some useful information for librarians who either design the youth services areas of their institutions\' sites or train tweens and teens to do research on the Web.
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