Young Adults

Should Young Children Use Computers?

A while back we posted a report published by the
Alliance for Childhood questioning
computer use by young children For those interested in
or in
need of support regarding appropriate computer use
by young children,
David Thornburg has a response on PBS.org.

\"What I DO have a problem with is the assertion
that computer use in school is designed to take the
place of these other activities. I have never visited a
school where children were not engaged in physical
play, art, and adult contact, even when these schools
are loaded to the gills with high-tech! Properly used,
technology just becomes another powerful tool for
learning. But the assertion of these authors is that we
have abandoned human contact for virtual worlds. \"

Media Centers Get Pinched

Sun-Sentinel.com has a Story on cuts in FL school library media centers. The cut backs in school funding are hitting the libraries hard. They talk about the Library Research Service in Colorado study that showed test scores were 18 percent higher in elementary schools and 10 to 15 percent higher in secondary schools with strong media centers.

\"We want to do the right thing and shrink classes, but who picks up those breaks?\" Correll said. \"It\'s awful, and it\'s not going to get any better.\"

Profanity in books of concern in Santa Fe

The Houston
Chronicle
has a Story on a TX town that is trying to
figure out how to keep books that include vulgar words
out of classrooms.

The district\'s school libraries already require parental
permission for children to check out books from author
J.K. Rowling\'s you know what series. They say they put
the policy in place to give parents who don\'t want their
children reading such material a way to prevent
it.

\"\"In today\'s public schools, there seem to be a
lot of books creeping in that have four-letter profanity in
them,\" board member John Couch said. \"We happened
to discover some in the fifth and sixth grades, and we\'re
concerned that that kind of language is getting past
some of the teachers and into the hands of students.

Responsibility for the children

Mary Ann Meyers has written an excellent piece on
childrens privacy.

\"Last Thursday I posted a response to Rory
Litwin\'s \"Editor\'s Note\" in
the current issue of *Library Juice*.
In
writing about intellectual freedom Rory posed
questions about \"freedom
from information.\" His insights provoked a response
from me, in part,
about the question of the rights of children. In addition,
because of
recent PubLib discussions about visual sex in libraries
and about the
ALA wrestler poster, I have been thinking about the
library profession\'s
stance (if any) on the differences (if any) between
textual and
graphical information. So I was glad to see this posting
about PamForce\'s article on
*LISNews*.\"

She goes on to share her ideas on
children\'s privacy, and responds to the original article
by Pam Force. -- Read More

Teachers Question Critical Study of Classroom Computers

NY Times has a Story on a new study underwritten by the Alliance for Childhood-- \"Fools Gold: A Critical Look at Computers in Childhood\" – says there is not enough research into the impact computers could have on the developing minds and bodies of young children. Not suprisingly, teachers are not too happy about the study.

\"With some kids, it\'s a way for them to get excited and learn,\" said Beth Lang who teaches second and third grades at Lakewood Elementary School in Overland Park, Kansas. \"To me, it\'s just like a book. It\'s such a part of our everyday use.\"


One of the Alliance for Childhood\'s objectives :\"To reduce children\'s growing dependance on electronic media\". Is that an indication of bias?

Board Members Drop Insurance to Buy Library

I Almost started to cry after reading This One from the Fresnobee. In Fresno County, CA school board members have done \"a very noble thing.\" They voluntarily dropped the health insurance they got as a benefit and pumped it into a new school library. These folks deserve a medal. What has your shool board done for you lately?

\"\"We all knew there was a need,\" says board president Lupe Zuniga. \"We couldn\'t figure out why no one ever figured this out before.\" -- Read More

Children\'s Privacy in the Library

Pam Force wrote a fantastic in-depth look at childrens privacy concerns in the library.


How do we define privacy? And what are the problems behind the complex issue of children\'s privacy in the library? Privacy can be defined as the ability to control information about one\'s self. Respecting the privacy of others is tantamount to accepting others as members of the human race. Once gaining privacy was as simple as closing the curtains, but no longer. The internet has made the issue of privacy a very personal one for every individual, not just those who use it. -- Read More

Student Newspapers and Censorship

Lee Hadden Writes:

An article in the Washington Post shows that many high school students
who have articles censored in their student newspapers, are then posting
their items on the internet from their home computer. This avoids the
regulations that schools place on budding reporters, but has its own
problems as well. Many parents and teachers remember the diatribes posted
by the students from Columbine HS school shortly before their shooting
rampage. Also, problems of teen angst, accountability and slander remain.

Banality on the web

The Christian Science Monitor has a Story on the troubling trend towards simple minded garbage on the net. What is needed, advocates say, is material that is more sophisticated in combining education and entertainment, is increasingly interactive, and involves teens themselves in its creation.

\"Not everyone agrees that there\'s a dearth of good content, however. David Kleeman of the American Center for Children and Media sees lots of high-quality Web sites, games, and interactive content emerging. He says one of the biggest obstacles is simply making children and parents aware of the quality content that is available online.\" -- Read More

Childrens Trivia Quiz

Bruce Flanders wrote:
Just for the fun of it, here\'s a trivia quiz for you. They
aren\'t too tough, but see how many you can get. This is reproduced from our
library staff newsletter, and was created by the newsletter\'s editor Maria
Butler.

\"The following are first lines from classic children\'s books. See how many
you can identify, by title and author. -- Read More

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