Young Adults

Young Adult human sexuality collection

Sarah Jean writes \"Progressive Librarian
,
Issue number 17, Summer 2000

The mystery and the act: towards a YA human sexuality collection by Teri Weesner

\"Young people viewing internet porn have an information need that can be addressed by youth services librarians and library collections. To ignore this information need is just as inaccurate and inappropriate as young people gleaning their information from internet pornography and cybersex chat.\" \"

Books That May Make Parents Blush

Today\'s
Washinton Post
has a Story on books aimed
at young adults. The books are testing limits and
pushing envelopes by using \"salty\" language, and
mature themes. They say it\'s the librarians who define,
and drive, the quality of teen literature in America.

\"...his \"edgy teen, sex-drugs-rock-and-roll,
\'Catcher-in-the-Rye\'-esque, troubled-teen-boy-and-girl
kind of fiction,\" as one publishing executive described it,
is mostly found on the Young Adult shelves of local
libraries..\"

NEA Poll Shows Reading Matters to Teens

Even in our fast-paced digital age with its emphasis on technology and computer skills, young people still recognize that turning their attention to the printed page is vital to success in work and life [more...]

Cutting TV may make kids gentler

The Seattle Times is one place running This Story on a report that says cutting back on the time children spend watching television and playing video games may lead to a decrease in aggressive behavior.

In a somewhat related stat, Donna Marentette passed along this from Statistics Canada-
According to new figures from Statistics Canada, the average Canadian watched 21.6 hours of television a week in 1999, down one hour from the year before and the lowest average viewership in two decades.

During the same time, the number of households with at least one regular Internet user jumped from 36% to 42%.

Children \'should be freer to roam internet\'

The Gaurdian has a Story on the Institute of Public Policy Research, a UK thinktank, that says Children should take a \"surfing proficiency test\" at 11, that would allow them a freer ride on the information superhighway.


\"\"We want to stress that it is not a completely negative test - it would also be about making sure that children are aware of what they can find in positive terms,\" said Mr Tambini. \"For example, information that could help them with their schoolwork. At present, they are not learning this in their classes - school computers filter out too much information.\"

Librarians--Playing many roles

A Story from Herald-Review.com on the budget cuts approved by the Decatur school board last month that will reduce the number of librarians next year from 23 to three!
They say that\'s a savings of $389,000, quick, what\'s 389,000 divided by 20?
19,450, how\'s that for an average pay check?

Children and Computer Technology

This journal issue examines the available research on how computer use affects children’s development, whether it increases or decreases the disparities between rich and poor, and whether it can be used effectively to enhance learning.


Executive Summary for easy reading.

Study finds errors rife in U.S. science textbooks

CNN is one place with The Story on how bad science textbooks seem to be. Twelve of the most popular science textbooks used at middle schools across the United States are riddled with 500 pages worth of errors. The part that scared me was They tried to contact textbook authors with questions but in many cases the people listed said they didn\'t write the book, some didn\'t even know their names were listed!

\"The books have a very large number of errors, many irrelevant photographs, complicated illustrations, experiments that could not possibly work, and drawings that represented impossible situations,\"

American Kids and the Net

Here is a short release on a study done that took a look at how kids are doing on the net.

\"New research on Internet usage among teens and young adults in 16 countries shows that while American youth spend more time online than kids elsewhere do, they are also more likely to have their parents monitor what they see and set limits on where they go. Conversely, youth in Europe spend less time online but have fewer restrictions on what they can see and do. These results emerge from Ipsos-Reid\'s The Face of the Web: Youth – a 16-country study of Internet users between the ages of 12 and 24.\"

The Grinch steals the classroom

Bob Cox writes:
Only a Liberryian.....


A Nice Story about a Liberryian who got all
dressed up as \"The Grinch\". \'Tis the season, after
all.

\"It takes an hour-and-a-half, but today, I got it down
to an hour and 10 minutes,\" he said. \"And then when I get
home, it\'s another hour to get it all off.\"

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