Young Adults

Geek Pride at Comic-Con

Consider yourself a geek? You'd be in good company at San Diego's thirty-ninth annual Comic-Con(vention), which opened yesterday. It started as a comic book conference way back when, but has since expanded into a multitude of entertainment formats.

Reports from Reuters, E Online, NYTimes, Empire OnLine, Publishers Weekly, AP, various live-bloggers and more.

Giving Away Used Books To a Good Home

David Mazor started his "Reader to Reader" program by trying to determine which town in which state was the poorest; then he called up the school librarian there and offered free books. This was eight years ago, and according to the Christian Science Monitor, the program based on the campus of Amherst College is still going strong and benefiting thousands of students across the U.S.

Keep Up With Technology, Keep Up With Teens

Since 2002, there has been a 15 percent increase in circulation and a 40 percent increase in visits, so reports the Conshocton Tribune(Central Ohio).

Young adult librarian RoseMary Honnold explains: "That grew out of a meeting I had with a tech club that I specifically put together to see what teens would be interested in. They asked for free Internet time and we talked about gaming. We acquired funds from various sources and add equipment as we go." Currently the library has a Nintendo Wii, a Playstation 2, the game Rock Band for the PS2, ten laptops and laptop games. Games can be projected on a movie screen through the use of a projector.

"I just come down to have fun. I check my MySpace, I play Rock Band, I hang out with my friends," said Justine Givens, 16. "It's a great place for teens to hang out."


Public libraries allow minors to check out R-rated movies

From ABC15 (KNXV-TV) in Phoenix, AZ:

Public libraries allow minors to check out R-rated movies:

R-rated movies with sex, nudity, and graphic violence are available for check-out at public libraries across the Valley, and the ABC15 Investigators found teenagers can get movies there they can't at the video store . . . .

OC Register Investigates if Games Are Good for Libraries

The Orange County Register ran a n article about a Anaheim Branch library that is incorporating games into it's teen programming. Read the story here: From one of the comments "Libraries are community centers now, not mausoleums. In this neighborhood, these kids need a place to go."

Deadline May 31: Free tickets to the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet at ALA Annual

There is still time to send in your application for free tickets to the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet at ALA Annual: Deadline is May 31, 2008. Apply now!


Thanks to the generous support of Marshall Cavendish, NMRT is able to offer three tickets to the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet at the ALA 2008 Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA. Tickets are $89 each, which would be out of the financial reach of most NMRT members if it weren't for the generosity of Marshall Cavendish.

Any NMRT member who is not currently serving on the Marshall Cavendish Award Committee may enter. Just write a short essay (around 250 words) telling us why you want to attend the Newbery/Caldecott/Wilder Banquet and how you feel you would benefit. For more information about Newbery, Caldecott and Wilder honorees, go to


Newbery-Caldecott Awards Banquet, Sunday, June 29, 6:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Join us for this gala evening to celebrate the Newbery and Caldecott Medalists and Honorees, authors and illustrators of the year’s most distinguished books for children. Cocktails (cash bar) available prior to dinner; doors open at 6:45 pm. Tickets are $89 and will be available at the Online Registration Counter until the event is sold out, or noon Friday, whichever occurs first. No tickets will be available at the door.


Mom appalled at racy books in store for teens at mall

Another day, Another Offended Mom, only this time it's not us being offensive, it's a store, Urban Outfitters. Mommy was surprised to find sexually charged books that she believes have no place in a clothing store for teens and young adults.

On one end of the spectrum was "Porn for Women" a photo book showing men doing housework. On the other was "Pornogami: A Guide to the Ancient Art of Paper-Folding for Adults" a guide for making anatomically correct artwork."When I saw it, I was shocked," mama said.

Messaging shorthand seeps into formal usage

OMG! WTH r kidz riting 2day?

Are you finding students utilizing text-message shorthand to express themselves in classwork and other communications? It's a trend so it seems.

While students are more likely to forgo text-messaging slang and acronyms in school assignments, they often will forget to maintain a level of academic formality when communicating with their teachers via e-mail, dropping punctuation and using acronyms.

“You’d think they would think ‘Oh, I’m writing my English teacher,’ but they use acronyms and forget punctuation and capitalization,” but that's not the case. Many teachers will forgive the informality in e-mails, because it’s a practice they themselves have grown accustomed to.

Librarian of Congress James H. Billington recently expressed concern about what he called the “slow destruction of the basic unit of human thought, the sentence.” Mr. Billington said he fears the disjointed prose of text messaging and chat-room discourse has damaged young Americans’ ability to write clearly. Chattanooga Free Times has the scoop.

Library of Congress Opens Main Reading Room to Researchers Age 16 and Older

Sweet sixteen and never been to the Library of Congress? Now you can enter the Main Reading Room as a researcher--L.O.C. has changed its policy to allow 16 and 17 year olds.

From the press release:

"The Library of Congress is always looking for ways to create new lifelong learners, to expand access to knowledge and to spark the creativity of future generations," said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington.

"We want people of all ages to be aware of the almost limitless resources that are available in libraries, including their de facto national library, especially at a time when the amount of information online still represents only a tiny fraction of the sum total of human knowledge."

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are more than 8 million 16- and 17-year-olds living in the United States.


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