Ebooks

The future belongs to the E-book

The E-book. At the Frankfurt Book Fair, the E-word was aggressively buzzing around the stands. A handy electronic device, capable of containing thousands of digital books, the first version was produced just ten years ago, only to disappear again a few years later. However, this time around, the timing seems to be right. Is the printed book doomed, and will we in future take an E-book with us to the beach?

Revolutionary plastic e-paper set to hit the high street

Revolutionary plastic e-paper set to hit the high street: The era of the traditional newspaper could soon be over as scientists launch production of a revolutionary electronic version - made out of plastic.
The e-reader is the brainchild of students at Cambridge University's Cavendish Laboratory and will be developed by manufacturing plant Plastic Logic at a factory in Germany. The invention is due to hit the high street next year.

DRM In Your Library? Consider This...

Thinking about utilizing a service in your library which uses Digital Rights Management (DRM)?

Consider the wise comic of Randall Munroe:

Work-in-progress for LISTen #43

I do caution that this likely has warts, typos, grammatical silliness, and worse. It is not a finished item and should not be treated that way. It is a work-in-progress that I am not finished revising and editing. It is planned that such be included in LISTen #43 in one form or another:

Commentary – The Strange Case of the Annoyed Librarian

For all the heat generated recently over the hosting by Library Journal of a blog by a person writing under the pen name “Annoyed Librarian”, there are disturbing things to be considered.

What is Library Journal? Is it a voice for the profession? While the publication may be that, it must also be remembered that it is a commercial entity. Unlike the libraries it serves, Library Journal has to turn a profit somehow. Library Journal is not owned by a professional association but rather Reed Business Information which publishes quite a few magazines and journals in fields beyond librarianship. Publications also produced by Reed Business Information include titles such as Modern Materials Handling, Home Textiles Today, Broadcasting & Cable, Daily Commercial News, Professional Remodeler, and more. The only thing that keeps such a publication afloat is the revenue derived from advertising and subscriptions. Library Journal is a for-profit entity quite unlike the predominantly not-for-profit world it serves.

As a for-profit media outlet, Library Journal is part of a world where it has to compete. Publications can host forums and blogs that do not necessarily agree with their editorial views. An example of such is the Washington Post which has a forum hosted by Ramesh Ponnuru who happens to be listed in the masthead of National Review as a senior editor. For those not familiar with such, the Washington Post is typically considered to be a liberal publication while Ponnuru writes for a publication associated with neo-conservatives. The forum continues and seems to be thriving. Similar works such as the blog network hosted by CNET, now part of the Interactive division of American television giant CBS, also allow for such diversity of views to be expressed even though they do not reflect the overall editorial view. For a year CNET had its own equivalent to the Annoyed Librarian known as the Macalope.

The outbursts and anger online over the hosting of the Annoyed Librarian's blog pose problems. For as much as librarians are supposed to be masters of information, are librarians well behind the curve in terms of media trends? Has the world changed and left librarians behind? It seems to be that even though librarians have tried to embrace Web 2.0 technologies that the louder librarians online don't quite see how the for-profit media landscape has changed. That becomes highly problematic, for example, in a public library setting when trying to answer questions at a reference desk without knowing about changes to the landscape that holds answers.

The Editor-in-Chief has made an open call for anybody willing to serve as a counter-balance to have hosting space from Library Journal. You could even potentially be paid for such! A big problem becomes whether it is easier to complain about somebody you don't like or to take action. If the granting of space to the Annoyed Librarian is such an existential threat to all librarianship then perhaps it is necessary to oppose such through a counter-balancing blog.

The two big benefits you could get from such would be the feeling that you are standing up for traditional values as well as some supplementary income perhaps. As someone who first saw their byline in newsprint ten years ago, I can say that the rules for the media realm are such that complaining about how hateful and spiteful someone may be is hardly as effective as providing competition. As such comes up in the for-profit realm routinely, it can hardly be said the skills to support providing competition are all that present in the non-profit realm most libraries inhabit.

Not all editorials need to give explicit marching orders in their calls to action. This one certainly won't. Sometimes editorials, let alone blog posts, are written just to hopefully jump-start the brains of those who hear or read such.

Be thankful that the Annoyed Librarian only got hosting space at Library Journal. Could you imagine seeing such as an arts and culture newspaper column distributed through a features syndicate that even the laity could see? Perhaps we can be thankful for small blessings that this is merely intramural for now.

E-books put to the test

Over on the BBC Working lunch's Simon Gompertz has visited the British Library and asked Librarians to give their opinions on electronic readers which have been designed to replace paper books.

Second Generation Kindle?

Cali Lewis of GeekBrief.TV highlighted the leak of possible photos of a new Kindle model. Cali's source has more.

E-paper tablet race heats up

E-paper tablet race heats up: Two startups are claiming the world's first letter-sized electronic paper tablet.

IRex Technologies BV (Eindhoven, Netherlands), a spinoff of Philips Electronics N.V., and Plastic Logic Inc. (Mountain View, Calif), a spinoff of the Cavendish Laboratory at University of Cambridge, U.K.

Both the iRex 1000 and the Plastic Logic Reader have outer dimensions approximating the size of an 8.5- by 11-inch tablet. Both use reflective, high-contrast gray-scale electrophoretic material from E-Ink Corp. (Cambridge, Mass.). The iRex 1000 is available now. Plastic Logic's Reader won't be available until 2009, but the company claims its tablet is slightly larger.

eBooks: The first step of a long change

Mitch Ratcliffe Says it’s clear that the eBooks market is growing. It’s also clear that there are huge hurdles to overcome before we, as readers, migrate away from paper. He shares a few ideas that he plans to test as he goes into his research process. He plans to write a long research report about eBooks, reading devices (including phones and PCs), and the ideas we need to throw out.
1.) Devices are optional.
2.) Format is the suicide king.
3.) It’s a new medium, stupid.
4.) How many ways can one copy be used?

Google Books now embeddable

Via Lifehacker Google Books are now embeddable on websites, just like YouTube videos! You can view an example here on Google Operating System posting.

Kindles in the classroom: World history teacher is sold on the K machine

From Teleread: I mentioned this story in an earlier post and I’m thrilled that Chris Edwards, teacher of World History at Fishers High School in Indiana, agreed to the following blog interview about his experience so far with Kindles in the classroom.
Full article here.

Syndicate content