Ebooks

Adobe Teams Up With Stanza to Create Open EBook Catalog Standard

From Readwriteweb comes this news,

"Adobe and Lexcycle, the company behind the popular Stanza eBook application, announced today that they are working together with the Internet Archive on turning the Stanza online catalog system into an open standard for distributing free and commercial eBooks. This new standard, the Open Publication Distribution System (OPDS), will be built on top of Atom, and aims to create an open standard for distributed online catalogs for electronic books."

Kindle Ebook Price Protest

Well, it didn't take long. Wired's Gadget Lab blog has a story about how a group of about 250 Kindle owners are staging an online protest over Kindle e-books that cost more than $9.99. The weapon they're using is Amazon's own tagging system, as price offenders are getting hit with a special "9 99 boycott" tag.

The roving--and most likely growing--band of annoyed Kindle owners includes such folks as Connecticut librarian Crystal O'Brien, who spends "a few minutes every day in the Kindle book store tagging the more expensive digital books with the '9 99 boycott' tag and removing it once the price drops below the threshold." Bookchase.

Is This the Future of the Digital Book?

PLENTY of authors dream of writing the great American novel.

Bradley Inman wants to create great fiction, dramatic online video and compelling Twitter stream — and then roll them all into a multimedia hybrid that is tailored to the rapidly growing number of digital reading devices.

Mr. Inman, a successful Silicon Valley entrepreneur, calls this digital amalgam a “Vook,” (vook.tv) and the fledgling company he has created with that name just might represent a possible future for the beleaguered book industry.

Full story in the NYT

Verizon Wireless: More E-book Readers May Be Coming

Are e-book readers going to be the next big thing in wireless? Verizon Wireless chief executive Lowell McAdam said "four or five" of them are in various stages of development in the company's open development labs.

"We want to be smart enough to go where the customers drive us," McAdam said, citing e-book readers as an example of a category that appears to be hot at the moment.

More here

Authors have lost the plot in Kindle battle

Cory Doctorow says Amazon's Kindle 2 text-to-speech feature is not so much violating authors' copyright but rather basic consumer rights.

Dropping $359 (£251) on a device whose features are subject to the outcomes of ongoing negotiations to which you are not a party is, frankly, nuts. Would you buy a car if it was known that your air-conditioner and stereo system could be remotely disabled?

Fujitsu Launches Color e-Book Reader in Japan

Japanese electronics maker Fujitsu has stepped into the e-book fray with the a color e-paper mobile device aimed at consumers. Thin and lightweight like its competition the Kindle, Fujitsu Frontech’s awkwardly named FLEPia, is now on sale in Japan and will start shipping on April 20 for around $1,000. Customers will have the option of purchasing e-books through the FLEPia-ya Web site via Japan’s largest e-book online retailer Papyless while connecting the device to the Internet via wi-fi.

More women are reading e-books

Today’s typical e-book reader is a woman, “between 40 and 50 years old, who tends to have a higher-than-average income and level of education.” A few years ago, by contrast, the most likely consumer of e-books was a male gadget freak.

More at the Christian Science Monitor

Collecting Digital Books




We will discuss move of University Presses other publishers to publish in digital format and the consequences and logistics of adjusting to this. How do libraries "collect" such material? How do we manage it?

Red Mars available for free download on Kindle

Here is the Amazon record for the paperback edition of Red Mars (Mars Trilogy) that sells for $7.99

The Kindle edition can be downloaded for free on Amazon: Red Mars (Kindle edition)

This is a good strategy by the publisher. Red Mars is the first book in a trilogy. If people download the first book and really enjoy it they may buy the second and third book. Those sell for $6.39 a piece. Green Mars -- Read More

A 'Kindle Society' Can Be Literate

On Talk of the Nation on NPR:

On this week's opinion page, Jacob Weinberg, editor-in-chief of the Slate Group, focuses on the new Kindle device. In a recent opinion piece on Slate.com, he asked: "Why should a civilization that reads electronically be any less literate than one that harvests trees to do so?"

You can listen to the 17 minute piece here.

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