Ebooks

Amazon and stolen Kindles

Article in the NYT about what Amazon does when a Kindle is stolen.

Texting? No, Just Trying to Read Chapter 6

NYT story about textbooks on the iPhone.

Apple uses a tagline in its iPhone commercials — “There’s an app for that”— to convey the idea that its phone is adaptable to almost any purpose. But an app that makes the double-page spread in a printed textbook easily readable on the iPhone? There’s no app for that.

Amazon.com Offers to Replace Copies of Orwell Book

Amazon invited some unflattering literary analogies earlier this summer when it remotely erased unlicensed versions of two George Orwell novels from its customers’ Kindle reading devices.

Jeffrey P. Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive, apologized to customers for the deletions in July. And late Thursday, the company tried to put the incident behind it, offering to deliver new copies of “1984” and “Animal Farm” at no charge to affected customers.

Amazon said in an e-mail message to those customers that if they chose to have their digital copies restored, they would be able to see any digital annotations they had made. Those who do not want the books are eligible for an Amazon gift certificate or a check for $30, the company said.

Full story in the NYT

One brave publishing executive speaks out on ebook pricing, and we comment

One brave publishing executive speaks out on ebook pricing, and we comment

Blog entry by Mike Shatzkin, publishing industry consultant.

Sony Announces Wireless Ebook Reader and Library Finder

Sony Electronics, Inc. announced the third member of its new ebook Reader family, the Reader Daily Edition, a wireless model with 3G connectivity.

Sony also announced the Library Finder, an application to enable users to access their local library's collection of ebooks via the Sony eBook Store.

Full press release.

Dire Warning to Publishers: The End of Hardbacks

According to the French publishing group Hachette: Hardback books could be killed off if Amazon’s e-books and Google’s digital library force publishers to slash prices, warns Arnaud Nourry, Hachette's chief executive.

Mr Nourry said unilateral pricing by Google, Amazon and other e-book retailers such as Barnes & Noble could destroy publishers’ profits (not to mention what is happening to bookstores).

He said publishers were “very hostile” to Amazon’s pricing strategy – over which the online retailer failed to consult publishers – to charge $9.99 for all its e-books in the US. He also pointed to plans by Google to put millions of out-of-copyright books online for public use.

“On the one hand, you have millions of books for free where there is no longer an author to pay and, on the other hand, there are very recent books, bestsellers at $9.99, which means that all the rest will have to be sold at between zero and $9.99,” Mr Nourry said.

Mr Nourry’s comments come as analysts predict a growth spurt for the still-niche electronic reader market, with wireless devices from Sony, Plastic Logic and others due to compete with the Kindle.

Financial Times reports.

Penn is an ebook user

In this video clip Penn from Penn and Teller mentions going to a bookstore to look at books and he mentions that he reads on electronic readers. Clip is called Evangelical Kung Fu.

Your Kindle can't do this, local library ebooks now available on the Sony Reader

Your Kindle can't do this, local library ebooks now available on the Sony Reader. Blog post at The Mobile Gadgeteer.

Googlebooks: Innovation and the Future of the Book

Interesting question from Karen Coyle: The question surrounding the settlement is: are authors (as defined by the Author's Guild) served by the Google/AAP settlement -- yes or no? The bigger question, What is the future of the book in our civilization? is not on the table. Yet, in the end, that may be the question that is answered by this settlement, whether that outcome serves authors or not.

Sony Wireless E-Book Reader Proves Kindle Was On Target

Only a few weeks ago Sony took the electronic book reader market by storm with its announcement of two new devices which undercut the popular Amazon Kindle by $100, but lacked the wireless connectivity of the Kindle. Sony's latest announcement of a wireless-equipped ereader shows that the Kindle pricing is actually reasonable.

Sony unveiled the 3G ereader today. It will be available in December of this year at a retail price of $399- a price tag $100 higher than the equivalent Amazon Kindle. It seems that making a cheaper device than the Kindle is one thing, but that making a comparable device cheaper is a horse of a different color.

Full article here.

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