Ebooks

BookServer: A Plan to Build an Open Web of Books

RWW Points Out The Internet Archive has just unveiled their ambitious project called BookServer, which will allow users to find, buy, or borrow digital books from sources all across the web. The system, built on an open architecture and using open book formats, promises that the books housed there will work on any device whether that's a laptop, PC, smartphone, game console, or one of the myriad of e-Readers like Amazon's Kindle.

Does the Brain Like E-Books?

In the NY Times Room for Debate commentary, five professionals from various fields give their views on e-books and what they do to our brains.

"Is there a difference in the way the brain takes in or absorbs information when it is presented electronically versus on paper? Does the reading experience change, from retention to comprehension, depending on the medium?"

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Libraries and Readers Wade Into Digital Lending


Kate Lambert recalls using her library card just once or twice throughout her childhood. Now, she uses it several times a month.

The lure? Electronic books she can download to her laptop. Beginning earlier this year, Ms. Lambert, a 19-year-old community college student in New Port Richey, Fla., borrowed volumes in the “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” series, “The Lovely Bones” by Alice Sebold and a vampire novel by Laurell K. Hamilton, without ever visiting an actual branch.

Full story in the NYT

New E-Book Company to Focus on Older Titles

Electronic “is going to be the center of the universe,” said Ms. Friedman, a flamboyant and relentless booster of authors during her four-decade career in New York publishing. “We really think that what we’re going to do is to help transform the industry, which is built on models that we all know are broken.”

When traditional publishers reissue print editions, they tend to do so with little fanfare. Ms. Friedman, by contrast, plans to push a torrent of online marketing on new readers in the hopes of reigniting the backlists of well-known authors in the digital world.

Full story in the New York Times

Barnes & Noble E-Reader Could Come Oct. 20 With Lending Options

Excerpt from story: The bookseller also hopes to make e-book lending a centerpiece of its device, according to two people in publishing who asked not to be named because talks were confidential. Readers can not lend digital books on the Kindle, although books can be read on up to six separate devices linked to the same Amazon account.

Pull post at the NYT Bits Blog

Bonfire of the Banned ITs: Why you can’t get the Kindle in Canada

If you live in Zimbabwe, Myanmar or the Falkland Islands, rejoice – you can now buy Amazon's white-hot electronic book-reader, the Kindle.

Canada, however, is still off-limits.

Amazon.com Inc. announced Wednesday it will begin selling the Kindle – which the company describes as the best-selling product among the millions it sells – in about 100 countries around the world.

But customers in Canada are still unable to order the device, possibly because of a delay in an agreement being reached with carriers over the Kindle's use of wireless technology to download content.

Full article here.

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10 Ways Publishing Can Be Saved

10 Ways Publishing Can Be Saved: Instead having legal waste their time combing the Internet trying to find every single book illegally posted, they should be spending money on young marketers who might actually find a free-based model that would work. Here are a ten relatively simple ways publishers can make money off electronic publishing:

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Kindle in the UK

Article in the Guardian about the Kindle in the UK.

Article raises some interesting questions. Because rights with some books differ from country to country you may not be able to download certain books depending what country you are in.

The article is here.

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In E-Books, It’s an Army vs. Google

A broad array of authors, academics, librarians and public interest groups are fighting Google’s plan to create a huge digital library and bookstore.

Story here.

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Kindle Goes International — With a Little Help From AT&T

Although Amazon’s Kindle e-reader has become the first major hit in its category — and the best-selling product in Amazon’s entire store this year — it does have its drawbacks. One of the biggest is that its wireless connection to the Kindle store works only in the U.S.

That changes on October 19, when Amazon begins shipping a new version of the Kindle that can be used to purchase and download books in over 100 countries. The new version, with the snappy name of “Kindle with US and International Wireless,” will sell for $280 and can be pre-ordered now.

The current version will still be for sale, and Amazon is dropping the price from $300 to $260. The bigger Kindle DX is unchanged.

Full story at Wired.com

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