Ebooks

Family literacy and K-12 success

Long post by Rothman that hits on family learning, digital libraries, importance of libraries, and a discussion of the book - The Smartest Kids in the World

Although long the article is broken into sections with bold headings.

There is a part where he gives important warnings to public libraries about the development of digital libraries.

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Ebook subscription startup Oyster expands to iPad and opens to all; some stats from Scribd

Ebook subscription startup Oyster expands to iPad and opens to all; some stats from Scribd
“Netflix for ebooks” Oyster launched on iPad and opened up to everybody Wednesday; previously it had only been available on iPhone. Rival service Scribd also released some stats showing that most of its use is coming from iPad.

The Abomination of Ebooks: They Price People Out of Reading

This is not one of those rants about missing the texture, touch, colors, whatever of paper contrasted with the sterility of reading on a tablet. No, the real abomination of ebooks is often overlooked: Some are so ingrained in the product itself that they are hiding in plain sight, while others are well concealed beneath layers of commerce and government.

The real problem with ebooks is that they’re more “e” than book, so an entirely different set of rules govern what someone — from an individual to a library — can and can’t do with them compared to physical books, especially when it comes to pricing.

The collusion of large ebook distributors in pricing has been a public issue for a while, but we need to talk more about how they are priced differently to consumers and to libraries. That’s how ebooks contribute to the ever-growing divide between the literary haves and have-nots.

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New E-Book Lending Service Aims To Be Netflix For Books

The website Scribd, online for several years now as a document storehouse, is beginning an e-book subscription service that will offer unlimited e-books for a flat monthly fee. Lynn Neary reports that Scribd is working with HarperCollins, which is the first major American publisher to take part in this kind of subscription service.

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The Abomination of Ebooks: They Price People Out of Reading

The real problem with ebooks is that they’re more “e” than book, so an entirely different set of rules govern what someone — from an individual to a library — can and can’t do with them compared to physical books, especially when it comes to pricing.
http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/10/how-ebook-pricing-hurts-us-in-more-ways-than-you-think/

Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

Amazon launches Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

if you've bought one of 10,000 selected titles from Amazon, you'll be entitled to snag a digital copy for between $2.99 and nothing. The service launches in October and there's no limit on when the purchases were made -- meaning that you could be offered an awkward reminder of the literature you were gorging back in 1995.

Endgadget press release coverage

A Masterpiece Book on Color Theory Is Now on the iPad

From Wired, "When Josef Albers published Interaction of Color in 1963, it was nothing less than the gateway to an entire way of thinking...But the physical version of the book, which has been circulated primarily in paperback for the last four decades, needed an update. Yale University Press has just done that, by releasing a new iPad version of Albers’ famous texts and color studies. Designed by New York City-based Potion Design, the Interaction of Color app is about as close as most of us will get to the original version of Albers’ masterpiece, which today primarily lives in special collections and museums. The app is nearly an exact digital replica of the 1963 version of the book, down to the original Baskerville typeface and layout of the text columns—but with some 21st century upgrades. “We were really thinking, how can we go back to the original intent of Albers’ book, and make something that he would’ve made today,” says Phillip Tiongson, one of the founders of Potion."

Does listening to an audiobook provide the same intellectual advantages or rewards as actually reading the book?

INteresting Reddit Discussion... Does listening to an audiobook provide the same intellectual advantages or rewards as actually reading the book?

One comment points to this:
“The way this is usually interpreted is that once you are good at decoding letters into sound, which most of us are by the time we’re in 5th or 6th grade, the comprehension is the same whether it’s spoken or written,” explained University of Virginia psychology professor Dan Willingham

Apple Conspired To Set E-Book Prices, Judge Rules

Apple Inc. "conspired to raise the retail price of e-books," a federal judge ruled Wednesday as a civil lawsuit brought by the Justice Department reached its conclusion.

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New DRM Changes Text of eBooks to Catch Pirates

A new form of DRM developed in Germany alters words, punctuation and other text elements so that every consumer receives a unique version of an eBook. By examining these “text watermarks”, copies that end up on the Internet can be traced back to the people who bought and allegedly pirated them. The project is a collaboration between researchers, the book industry and the Government and aims to be a consumer-friendly form of DRM.

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