Oyster to Exit E-Book Subscription Business

It’s not so easy to offer a Netflix-like experience.

The Oyster e-book subscription service that launched with much fanfare in 2013 has posted a note on its blog stating it will be exiting that business over the next few months and offering refunds to subscribers who request them. The service provides access to more than 1 million e-books on an all-you-can read basis for $9.95 a month.



E-Readers Foil Good Night’s Sleep

Use of a light-emitting electronic book (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness and the circadian clock, which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, according to Harvard Medical School researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. These findings of the study that compared the biological effects of reading an LE-eBook to a printed book are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on December 22, 2014.

From E-Readers Foil Good Night’s Sleep | HMS


Five decades of Met Publications on art history available online

“The full contents of almost all other book titles may be read online, searched, or downloaded as a PDF.”
Teacher alert: Select Educator Publication to see all the Resource for Educator titles.


The Rise of Phone Reading

It’s not the e-reader that will be driving future books sales, it’s the phone. WSJ’s Jennifer Maloney joins Tanya Rivero with a look at now publishers are rethinking books for the small screen.


The 'Netflix Of Books' Hopes To Open Up The E-Book Market

Oyster, the subscription e-book service, announced Wednesday that it will be doing something that's a little bit retro: selling e-books the old-fashioned way, just one at a time.

Since its launch in 2013, Oyster has founded its brand — and earned the auspicious nickname "Netflix of books" — on a monthly payment model not unlike an all-you-can-eat buffet. Now, if readers would like to order just one of those dishes, so to speak, they can. Oyster has expanded its service to include an e-bookstore, which can also be accessed by those without a subscription.

In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Oyster CEO Eric Stromberg said the move into retail is a response to the shifting habits of readers. As more people have begun to read their e-books on tablets and phones — not just dedicated e-readers — they are less tied to specific platforms to buy those digital books, Stromberg tells the Journal. In turn, he says, this opens doors for retailers.



Paper Books Will Never Die

This blog post on Gizmodo makes the case for paper bound books.

"So how can I be confident that paper books are going to be with us for a long time to come? First of all, because they're lovely and I refuse to believe they'll ever disappear. But also because paper books are still a fantastic and irreplaceable piece of technology.

Believe it or not, paper book sales have made a modest comeback in the past year. Ebooks are mainstream. But paper books have too many benefits to simply die out anytime soon."

E-Books Are Damaging Your Health: Why We Should All Start Reading Paper Books Again

Reading regular books comes with a slew of health benefits that their electronic counterparts don't have.

Research and opinion from Medical Daily.


Books Suck: Why I Love My Kindle More Than Dead Trees

Harry Guinness states his case in this post on Make Use Of.

"As someone who’s dropped a Wheel of Time novel on my face, I can tell you the debate on reading experience is well over. Modern e-readers hold thousands of novels, weigh next to nothing, have built in lights, high resolution screens and don’t give you a concussion when they hit your nose. Books hold a single novel (or occasionally a couple of shorter ones), weigh way more, have to be angled towards a light, rely on manual screen refresh and can give you a black eye for weeks."


S&S Expands Library E-book Lending

Simon & Schuster is opening up its e-book lending program to all libraries. Previously, the publisher's catalog was available only to those libraries participating in its “Buy It Now” merchandising program, which gives the library patron the option to purchase a copy of an S&S e-book through the library’s online portal, with a portion of the proceeds from each sale going to the library.



Land Rover Tries Ebook Publishing

Soon after turning out the latest James Bond novel, British author William Boyd agreed to write another thriller based on a world famous brand.

The Land Rover.

Boyd's nearly 17,000-word story, "The Vanishing Game," coming out Wednesday as a free download through Amazon.com, Apple and www.thevanishinggame.com , tells of a 35-year-old British actor named Alec Dunbar and the troubles he encounters when a pretty young woman convinces him to deliver a flask filled with clear liquid from London to Scotland. His transport is a certain four-wheel-drive vehicle.

Boyd, paid in the low six figures for the project, said he signed on because Land Rover made so few requests.

"They said they wanted an adventure and they said, 'Somewhere in this adventure it would be good if a Land Rover appeared.' But it was left entirely to me the extent I concentrated on that or made it fleeing and passing," the 62-year-old Britain-based author said during a recent telephone interview.




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