Cataloging

Browsing LCSH

This database contains about 5.2 million Library of Congress Subject Headings, set up for browsing by the authority headings themselves but also by phrases and even words contained in the headings. The large majority of the records are for personal names and name/title combinations. This is in a very early stage! Little time and no funding was available for it, so please don't expect perfection.

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The Rosetta Project's Rosetta Disk: The 10,000-Year Library

Slashdot posted a link to The Rosetta Disk, the physical companion of the Rosetta Digital Language Archive, and a prototype of one facet of The Long Now Foundation's 10,000-Year Library. The Rosetta Disk is intended to be a durable archive of human languages, as well as an aesthetic object that suggests a journey of the imagination across culture and history. We have attempted to create a unique physical artifact which evokes the great diversity of human experience as well as the incredible variety of symbolic systems we have constructed to understand and communicate that experience. The Rosetta Project "Working to develop a contemporary version of the historic Rosetta Stone, a meaningful survey and near permanent archive of 1000 languages."

Sandy Berman Appreciation Month

Jenna Freedman declares the six weeks or so from now until his birthday on October 6, Sandy Berman appreciation month. She's asking for participatiion by sending him cards, flowers, subject heading suggestions, and low fat schnitzel.

Sanford Berman
Room 615 - Bed 2
Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital
6500 Excelsior Blvd.
St. Louis Park, MN 55426

He'll probably be at the above address for at least a month. While his condition isn't life threatening, it is very serious. He has two broken vertebrae in his neck and secondary injuries from the surgery and will be in a series of body, back and neck braces for some time. But don't feel that you have to know him to write to him. Sandy has long been a friend and mentor to librarians, LIS students, and activists that he's never met.

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BiblioCommons Emerges: “Revolutionary” Social Discovery System for Libraries

Over at Library Journal Norman Oder Covers The Launch of BilbioCommons, a new social discovery system for libraries that replaces all user-facing OPAC functionality, allowing for faceted searching and easier user commenting and tagging, has gone live in Oakville, ON, a city of 160,000 outside Toronto. It is expected to be used by public libraries serving more than half of Canada’s population—and some libraries in the United States, too. “This is revolutionary, as far as I’m concerned,” Gail Richardson, Oakville PL’s acting director of online services, told LJ. “People don’t want a library that acts like just a glorified card catalog online. They want a catalog that’s as good as Google and Amazon.”

Class numbers on works

Lorcan Dempsey's weblog: Classify is a protoype service which provides a snapshot of what class numbers (DDC, LCC, NLM) have been assigned to works in Worldcat.

The records are grouped using the OCLC FRBR Work-Set algorithm resulting in a work-level summary of the class numbers assigned a title. You can retrieve a classification summary by ISBN, ISSN, UPC, OCLC number, or author/title. [About Classify [OCLC]]

He points out the LCC numbers assigned to The Consequences of Modernity by Anthony Giddens

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LCSH, SKOS and lcsh.info

Von Totanes sent this one over: "LCSH, SKOS and lcsh.info: the entire LCSH has recently been uploaded at lcsh.info, which is an experimental service that aims to "encourage experimentation and use of LCSH on the web."

It's far from being an ebook that non-techies like me can use easily, but if you understand what Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) is all about, you might be able to make it work for you and develop
new ways of using LCSH online in non-traditional ways, aside from not having to buy a new set every few years. More...

Is the Academic Library OPAC Going Extinct?

I don't normally point to LJ (not because I don't read/like it, but because you should already be reading it, and I normally try to point at things you would never read elsewhere.) but you should go read Google Books vs. BISON right now.

"We invest so much effort getting students to use our resources; it is absolutely excruciating to know we are frequently sending them off with nothing, especially when they don't ask for help from librarians."

"The bar has been raised. The maturing Internet and evolving array of Web 2.0 services has turned our customer base into what many have called a “Google Generation.” We can debate that moniker, but, clearly, no one is calling this the “Academic Library Generation.” Our BISON catalog may not be extinct, but it is being hunted down by the competition. As in nature, libraries had best adapt, change quickly, and build on past successes."

Tip O' The Hat to Bernie Sloan for the link.

Future of cataloging debate - any thoughts?

From the "Cataloging Futures" blog.

So after 3-4 years of talking about the future of cataloging--Where are we? That's the question I'm asking myself before next week's Palinet symposium on the future of cataloging.

Full blog entry here.

I followed the link at the "Cataloging Futures" blog to the Palinet symposium and there was this blurb about Karen Calhoun, who is the keynote speaker.

Karen Calhoun joined OCLC in May 2007 as Vice President, WorldCat & Metadata Services, to chart the future of OCLC's cataloging services and extend WorldCat’s global reach. From 1996 to April 2007, Ms. Calhoun served in leadership positions at Cornell University Library, where she penned the infamous "Calhoun report" on the future of the catalog.

Here is a link to the Calhoun report.

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Library of Congress Subject Heading Suggestion Results

The following is a round up of the subject headings (24), cross-references (6), and subdivisions (2) suggested to the Library of Congress during our LCSH Blog-a-Thon. Included is anything that was legitimately tagged with rr_lcsh2008 on del.icio.us. Thanks to everyone who helped promote this effort, and huge thanks to everyone who participated.

Members of Radical Reference hope to work with catalogers, particularly those from the RADCAT discussion list to SACOfy suggested headings that haven't previously been submitted to LC in a formal manner. However, we also think that it would be nice if the form weren't the barrier that it is for non-cataloging librarians to contribute subject heading ideas.

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On Innovation in the ILS Marketplace

The Disruptive Library Technology Jester takes a look at Last month's ILS Discovery Interface Task Force1 of the DLF meeting of library system vendors (including one commercial support organization for open source ILS software) to talk about the state of computer-to-computer interfaces in-to and out-of the ILS. The meeting comes as the work of the task force is winding down. An outcome of the meeting, the “Berkeley Accord2,” was posted last week to Peter Brantley’s blog. The accord has three basic parts: automated interfaces for offloading records from the ILS, a mechanism for determining the availability of an item, and a scheme for creating persistent links to records.

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