BiblioCommons Emerges: “Revolutionary” Social Discovery System for Libraries

Over at Library Journal Norman Oder Covers The Launch of BilbioCommons, a new social discovery system for libraries that replaces all user-facing OPAC functionality, allowing for faceted searching and easier user commenting and tagging, has gone live in Oakville, ON, a city of 160,000 outside Toronto. It is expected to be used by public libraries serving more than half of Canada’s population—and some libraries in the United States, too. “This is revolutionary, as far as I’m concerned,” Gail Richardson, Oakville PL’s acting director of online services, told LJ. “People don’t want a library that acts like just a glorified card catalog online. They want a catalog that’s as good as Google and Amazon.”

Class numbers on works

Lorcan Dempsey's weblog: Classify is a protoype service which provides a snapshot of what class numbers (DDC, LCC, NLM) have been assigned to works in Worldcat.

The records are grouped using the OCLC FRBR Work-Set algorithm resulting in a work-level summary of the class numbers assigned a title. You can retrieve a classification summary by ISBN, ISSN, UPC, OCLC number, or author/title. [About Classify [OCLC]]

He points out the LCC numbers assigned to The Consequences of Modernity by Anthony Giddens



Von Totanes sent this one over: "LCSH, SKOS and the entire LCSH has recently been uploaded at, which is an experimental service that aims to "encourage experimentation and use of LCSH on the web."

It's far from being an ebook that non-techies like me can use easily, but if you understand what Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) is all about, you might be able to make it work for you and develop
new ways of using LCSH online in non-traditional ways, aside from not having to buy a new set every few years. More...

Is the Academic Library OPAC Going Extinct?

I don't normally point to LJ (not because I don't read/like it, but because you should already be reading it, and I normally try to point at things you would never read elsewhere.) but you should go read Google Books vs. BISON right now.

"We invest so much effort getting students to use our resources; it is absolutely excruciating to know we are frequently sending them off with nothing, especially when they don't ask for help from librarians."

"The bar has been raised. The maturing Internet and evolving array of Web 2.0 services has turned our customer base into what many have called a “Google Generation.” We can debate that moniker, but, clearly, no one is calling this the “Academic Library Generation.” Our BISON catalog may not be extinct, but it is being hunted down by the competition. As in nature, libraries had best adapt, change quickly, and build on past successes."

Tip O' The Hat to Bernie Sloan for the link.

Future of cataloging debate - any thoughts?

From the "Cataloging Futures" blog.

So after 3-4 years of talking about the future of cataloging--Where are we? That's the question I'm asking myself before next week's Palinet symposium on the future of cataloging.

Full blog entry here.

I followed the link at the "Cataloging Futures" blog to the Palinet symposium and there was this blurb about Karen Calhoun, who is the keynote speaker.

Karen Calhoun joined OCLC in May 2007 as Vice President, WorldCat & Metadata Services, to chart the future of OCLC's cataloging services and extend WorldCat’s global reach. From 1996 to April 2007, Ms. Calhoun served in leadership positions at Cornell University Library, where she penned the infamous "Calhoun report" on the future of the catalog.

Here is a link to the Calhoun report.


Library of Congress Subject Heading Suggestion Results

The following is a round up of the subject headings (24), cross-references (6), and subdivisions (2) suggested to the Library of Congress during our LCSH Blog-a-Thon. Included is anything that was legitimately tagged with rr_lcsh2008 on Thanks to everyone who helped promote this effort, and huge thanks to everyone who participated.

Members of Radical Reference hope to work with catalogers, particularly those from the RADCAT discussion list to SACOfy suggested headings that haven't previously been submitted to LC in a formal manner. However, we also think that it would be nice if the form weren't the barrier that it is for non-cataloging librarians to contribute subject heading ideas.


On Innovation in the ILS Marketplace

The Disruptive Library Technology Jester takes a look at Last month's ILS Discovery Interface Task Force1 of the DLF meeting of library system vendors (including one commercial support organization for open source ILS software) to talk about the state of computer-to-computer interfaces in-to and out-of the ILS. The meeting comes as the work of the task force is winding down. An outcome of the meeting, the “Berkeley Accord2,” was posted last week to Peter Brantley’s blog. The accord has three basic parts: automated interfaces for offloading records from the ILS, a mechanism for determining the availability of an item, and a scheme for creating persistent links to records.

Library of Congress Subject Heading Suggestion Blog-a-Thon

Do subject headings still matter? says they do. Does the Library of Congress always identify accessible and appropriately named headings and implement them in a timely manner? They say not always. All you have to do is spend one day behind a reference desk to see examples of biased, non-inclusive, and counterintuitive classifications that slow down, misdirect, or even obscure information from library users. As librarians and library workers, providing access to information is important-and classifying it in ways that are inclusive and intuitive strengthens our egalitarian mission.

Between now and Sunday, April 27, Radical Reference invites you to suggest subject headings and/or cross-references which will then be compiled and sent to the Library of Congress. You can either choose one previously suggested by Sandy Berman (pdf or spreadsheet) or propose your own.

Links to OPAC Enhancements, Wrappers, and Replacements

Here are the supplemental links for the presentation at the NISO workshop on discovery layers1 in Chapel Hill, NC, on March 28, 2008. Carolyn McCallum at Wake Forest University posted a great summary of day two of the NISO discovery layer forum2, including an overview of the talk.

Foundational Pieces
The presentation started as an extension of a DLTJ blog post. Also mentioned was Marshal Breeding’s Library Technology Report4 published in July/August of 2007 and available from the ALA store5.

Tour of Systems
For each of the 10 systems that were toured in the course of the presentation there is a link to the home page of the product/project and a link to a demo or canonical live example.

Towards a modern, functional OPAC

Aaron Schmidt has used quite a few library OPACs. He's also used and sought out the best of the open web. You’ve probably done the same and like him, you’ve probably been dismayed at the disparity between the two worlds. The open web can be fun and inspiring. Would you say the same of our OPACs? He's thought about what OPACs should be like in bits and pieces and decided to assemble them here.

A Problem
Besides all of the small, simple usability enhancements OPACs need (listed way below) a big concern about library websites and OPACs is the distracting transition between the two. You know the routine. Ubiquitous “Click here to search the catalog” links take users from one place to another and create a disjointed experience.

Aaron's Solution
One way to provide a seamless experience is to put some OPAC functions into the website, letting people accomplish OPAC tasks without having to leave the library website. In Aaron's dream OPAC this go-between is essentially an ecommerce shopping basket but called a backpack or bookshelf in this instance. Just like on, when logged in, a patron’s library backpack appears on every library webpage, whether it be the homepage, a book list, or the results list of a search. Any item cover on the website can be dragged and dropped into users’ backpack/bookshelf.


Subscribe to Cataloging