New e-mail reflector

This already went out on two e-mail reflectors I am subscribed to, so I doubt there is a web page spreading the word:
Hi, colleagues: A listserv FOLKSONOMY has been created. Please following the instruction below to sign on if you are interested in this topic and would like to contribute some studies you have done on it. Also please help to spread the listserv and let more people to join our discussion. Thank you. Instruction of sign in and other commands: Here are some basic listserv commands, Each command should be on it's own line, in an email to [email protected] - Anyone can subscribe themselves to folksonomy with: subscribe folksonomy First_name Last_name - Subscribers may be able to get a list of subscribers with: review folksonomy - Archives may be available to subscribers with: index folksonomy

OCLC Defends Records Policy, Faces Questions, Suggestions, and Criticisms

If you've been following along with OCLC’s recently revised—and suspended—policy regarding record-sharing, here's a couple of stories you'll want to check out.

OCLC’s recently revised—and suspended—policy regarding record-sharing: Norman Oder covers a Lively discussion at Midwinter Meeting, he writes OCLC's Karen Calhoun defends intent, apologizes about communication while others question OCLC’s path.

DON'T MISS Consideration of OCLC Records Use Policy: "We build bibliographic records as surrogates for the desired object, meaning that the surrogate is a means to an end – retrieving the described object – and not an end onto itself. We build indexes of these surrogates for patrons to use to discover information. All other factors held constant, the better the surrogate, the greater the chance the user will find the information they are seeking. The following discussion looks at the sources of records, the way they are built, and what it means to try to share them."

Reflections upon an LJ story

It could be reasonably asked why this is in text when it could have been on the podcast. There are reasons for such. Unfortunately I cannot let loose with spoilers at this time.

Norman Oder reports at LJ online about Karen Calhoun speaking at ALA. I wish I could have been there. I do not relish the thought of asking on AUTOCAT how acrimonious the session was or was not.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

LibraryThing and CIG—the deal!

LibraryThing and CIG—the deal! LibraryThing has just partnered up with Cambridge Information Group, which owns Bowker, AquaBrowser, ProQuest, Serials Solutions and RefWorks.

Why you can't find a library book in your search engine

You might expect forward-thinking libraries to put their databases online, to encourage people through their doors. But they can't. Even though they created the data, pay to have records added to the database and pay to download them, they can't.

"It's safe to say that the policy change is a direct response to Open Library," says Aaron Swartz, the founder of Open Library (, a project to give every published book its own Wikipedia-style page. "Since the beginning of Open Library, OCLC has been threatening funders, pressuring libraries not to work with us, and using tricks to try to shut us down. It didn't work - and so now this."

Perceptions 2008: An International Survey of Library Automation

This report describes the results of a survey that Marshall Breeding conducted to gather data regarding the perceptions of libraries toward their automation systems, the organizations that provide support, and the quality of support they receive. It also aims to gauge interest in open source library automation systems.

This year, Marshall received 1,450 responses from libraries in 51 different countries. The countries most strongly represented include the United States (1,150 responses), United Kingdom (49), Canada (99), Australia (44). As with the general demographics of the lib-web-cats database, the respondents of the library primarily come from libraries in English-speaking countries. Survey results were gathered between October 31, 2008 and January 16, 2009. Mobile Service Pilot Launched

OCLC announced today via e-mail and the relevant website a new service. In partnership with purported industry leader Boopsie, OCLC is launching a mobile-optimized platform for searching The service requires the download of a client package to your mobile phone or device for optimized searching. There is a list of supported devices available that appears to lack the iPhone, iPod Touch, and the G1 as the more recent Palm Centro devices as well as any tablets from Nokia or similar vendors.

LibraryThing Calls for New Cataloguing Scheme

With all the talk of Dewey or Don't We...

Gawd I'm getting tired of that phrase.

Anyway, with all the talk of whether or not libraries should use DDC, LCCN, BISAC, or something else for their collections and then the possibility of using open databases instead of OCLC, it seems like cataloguing is on everybody's mind.

It is over at LibraryThing too, where they've issued a call for the creation of OSC, or the Open Shelves Classification. They're looking for a few librarians who are of a mind to create a system that's free, "humble," modern, open source, and crowd sourced. Indeed, they want something that the library profession has needed for a long time - a modern system capable of changing, and changing easily.

So if you're of the cataloguing bent, check it out. and the future of cataloging and the future of cataloging: Not to be confused with just “Biblios“, which is LibLime’s new open source cataloger’s editor. That’s cool too, but Jonathan Rochkind is talking about, which is basically a shared metadata store. That is, technological support for ‘cooperative cataloging’. That is, what we used to call a ‘bibliographic utility’. The Biblios editor uses the shared metadata store, but it’s not restricted to use by the Biblios editor, anyone can use it.

Chances to stop and think about the future of library catalogs

Chances to stop and think about the future of library catalogs: From WorldCat to Google, the way we use catalogs and other metadata services is changing rapidly. John Mark Ockerbloom hopes we’ll have a chance during ALA, and during OCLC’s policy review period, to think carefully and creatively about how we should change these services to meet the needs of today’s and tomorrow’s information seekers. And then he hopes we’ll make those changes happen.



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