Cataloging

Suggested RDA Improvements

Mac Elrod of Special Libraries Cataloguing responds to Tuesday's announcement that implementation of RDA, the successor to AACR2r, has been recommended to be delayed until 2013.

Open data’s role in transforming our bibliographic framework

Open data’s role in transforming our bibliographic framework
If you also see potential in open library data, now is an excellent time to join in the discussions that the Library of Congress and OCLC are inviting. The more these and other leading organizations in the library community see how open data can advance the goals of the community, and how open data initiatives can get the support needed to be sustainable, the richer the knowledge base that our evolving bibliographic framework will support.

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The search for a minimum viable record

The search for a minimum viable record
The Open Library has run into these complexities and challenges as it seeks to create "one web page for every book ever published."

George Oates, Open Library lead, recently gave a presentation in which she surveyed audience members, asking them to list the five fields they thought necessary to adequately describe a book. In other words, what constitutes a "minimum viable record"? Akin to the idea of the "minimum viable product" for getting a web project coded and deployed quickly, the minimum viable record (MVR) could be a way to facilitate an easier exchange of information between library catalogs and information systems.

In the interview below, Oates explains the issues and opportunities attached to categorization and MVRs.

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How the Modern Web Environment is Reinventing the Theory of Cataloguing

Panizzi, Lubetzky, and Google: How the Modern Web Environment is Reinventing the Theory of Cataloguing: This paper uses cataloguing theory to interpret the partial results of an exploratory study of university students using Web search engines and Web-based OPACs. The participants expressed frustration with the OPAC; while they sensed that it was "organized," they were unable to exploit that organization and attributed their failure to the inadequacy of their own skills. In the Google searches, on the other hand, students were getting the support traditionally advocated in catalogue design. Google gave them starting points: resources that broadly addressed their requirements, enabling them to get a greater sense of the knowledge structure that would help them to increase their precision in subsequent searches. While current OPACs apparently fail to provide these starting points, the effectiveness of Google is consistent with the aims of cataloguing as expressed in the theories of Anthony Panizzi and Seymour Lubetzky

Libraries + RFID + Augmented Reality = ?

Okay, so Apple has a patent on blah-dee-blah and the next-gen-iProducts will have an RFID chip onboard, but what could this mean for libraries?

I'm not familiar with what you can do with RFID, but I was wondering if there would be an app that would be called a Dewey Killer.

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Cataloging Digital Documents

On "All Things Considered"

This week, Maya Angelou turned over a large trove of personal papers to the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. The collection includes many handwritten notes, drafts and letters. Nowadays, though, so much writing is done on computers rather than on paper; correspondence is done over email rather than through the postal service. To talk about how archivists deal with this shift toward digital documents, Michele Norris talks with Richard Oram, associate director of the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Full piece here.

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The Internet Needs a Dewey Decimal System

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Words often fail us in our information searches on the web. A Dewey Decimal System for the web would help connect more people to the information they're looking for. Not only would this help individuals, it would speed commerce, increase education and improve health outcomes. <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/206230/the_internet_needs_a_dewey_decimal_system.html">The Internet Needs a Dewey Decimal System</a>

The coming age of FRBR-ized library catalogs

The coming age of FRBR-ized library catalogs :
There’s been a lot of talk lately in the library world about the coming age of FRBR-ized library catalogs (prompted in part by development of RDA, a cataloging standard that uses FRBR). Exactly what such catalogs will look like, and whether they will actually help readers use the library more effectively, are matters of ongoing debate. One of the key differences between FRBR and older catalog models is that books and other resources that share common properties can be grouped together at various levels of abstraction.

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6 of the Best Free Linux Library Management Systems

6 of the Best Free Linux Library Management Systems
To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 6 excellent library management systems. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone who needs an enterprise resource planning system for a library.

Now, let's explore the 6 library management systems at hand. For each title we have compiled its own portal page, providing a screenshot of the software in action, a full description with an in-depth analysis of its features, together with links to relevant resources and reviews.

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