Books

Free to All: Carnegie Libraries & American Culture, 1890-1920

Familiar landmarks in hundreds of American towns, Carnegie libraries today seem far from controversial. In Free to All, however, Abigail A. Van Slyck shows that the classical façades and symmetrical plans of these buildings often mask a complex and contentious history.
Book - Free to All: Carnegie Libraries & American Culture, 1890-1920

Roadside Picnic (Rediscovered Classics)

First published in 1972, Roadside Picnic is still widely regarded as one of the greatest science fiction novels, despite the fact that it has been out of print in the United States for almost thirty years. This authoritative new translation corrects many errors and omissions and has been supplemented with a foreword by Ursula K. Le Guin and a new afterword by Boris Strugatsky explaining the strange history of the novel’s publication in Russia.

Book: http://amzn.to/2kvqZlb

Wikipedia entry about book:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
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Your Child Should Read Banned Books

From pediatrician Perri Klass via the New York Times, why children should read banned books, and some recommendations.

What book has been most meaningful to you?

Author Will Schwalbe say down with Jeff Brown to talk meaningful books. What book has been most meaningful to you?

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Call Me Ishmael - The Hobbit

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Footnotes from the World's Greatest Bookstores

Book -- Footnotes from the World's Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments from Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers

From beloved New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein, Footnotes from the World’s Greatest Bookstores invites you into the heart and soul of every community: the local bookshop, each with its own quirks, charms, and legendary stories.

This collection of seventy-five of the most cherished bookstores from around the world features evocative paintings by Eckstein paired with colorful anecdotes about each shop, featuring a roster of great thinkers and artists of our time, including David Bowie, Tom Wolfe, Joe Frank, Tracy Chevalier, Jonathan Lethem, Michael Palin, Roz Chast, Deepak Chopra, Bob Odenkirk, Robin Williams, Patricia Marx, Philip Glass, Paul McCartney, Dave Berry, Michael Jackson, Jonathan Ames, Terry Gross, Mark Maron, Neil Gaiman, Ann Patchett, Jo Nesbo, Diane Keaton, Chris Ware, Molly Crabapple, Amitav Ghosh, Patti Smith, Mo Willems, Alice Munro, Dave Eggers, Roxanna Robinson, Garrison Keillor and many more.

Page by page, Eckstein perfectly captures our lifelong love affair with books, bookstores, and book-sellers that is at once heartfelt, bittersweet, and cheerfully confessional.

Footnotes from the World's Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments from Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers

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Penguin Galaxy - Science Fiction series

Penguin Galaxy, a hardcover collectible series of six sci-fi/fantasy classics, featuring a series introduction by Neil Gaiman.

The books are:
Stranger in a Strange Land
Dune
2001: A Space Odyssey
Neuromancer
The Left Hand of Darkness
The Once and Future King

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The world's most valuable scientific books and manuscripts - an overview of the marketplace

After several months researching the marketplace, we've compiled a list of the 50 most valuable scientific documents sold at auction. This article is a preview of the research and an overview of the scientific documents and manuscripts marketplaces. Over the next week we'll reveal our findings in detail, counting down to number one in a series of articles that provide an intriguing insight into both the history of science and the value of its most important writings.
From The world's most valuable scientific books and manuscripts - an overview of the marketplace
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There’s a word in Japanese for the literary affliction of buying books you don’t read

Tsundoku is the stockpiling of books never consumed. Sahoko Ichikawa, a senior lecturer in Japanese at Cornell University, explains that tsunde means “to stack things” and oku is “to leave for a while.” The word originated in Japan’s late 19th century Meiji Era from a play on words. Sometime around the turn of the century, the oku in tsunde oku was replaced with doku, meaning to read. But because tsunde doku rolls awkwardly off the tongue, the mashup version became tsundoku.
From There’s a word in Japanese for the literary affliction of buying books you don’t read — Quartz
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Printed easter eggs: fore-edge paintings hidden in books

High-end printers began decorating the edges of books as the craft developed, including dyeing and gilding the edges, but in the 17th century, artisans began creating fore-edge paintings that could only be seen when books were fanned.
From Printed easter eggs: fore-edge paintings hidden in books / Boing Boing
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