Books

Copernicus Tempts Thieves Worldwide

BookWire has an interesting Story on the rash of rare book thefts. Keep your eye on the rare books room!

Copies of one of the world\'s rarest and most valuable books have been disappearing a rash of mysterious thefts that have perplexed police from the former Soviet Union to the United States.
At least seven of the 260 known copies of the 1543 edition of ``De revolutionibus\'\' have disappeared in recent years, including one copy each from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and the Mittag-Leffler Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, according to Owen Gingerich, a professor at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. Five copies remain missing. -- Read More

Books are not just for reading now

I almost wanted to put this in Humor.

The Lansing State Journal Has a Story on the newest home decorating trend, Books!

They\'re books, but they\'re not just for reading anymore.

\"Sometimes we have interior decorators buy books by the yard for customers,\" said Ray Walsh, owner of Archives Book Shop and the Curious Book Shop in East Lansing. \"It really does add a personal touch,\" he said.

\"Every once in awhile we get someone who has model homes who buys books for display so the house doesn\'t look empty,\" Walsh said. -- Read More

Booknews: Hot New Titles for Spring

Publishers Weekly is out with a List of hot new books. The list includes.

Fair Ball: A Fan\'s Case for Baseball
The Running Mate
I Capture the Castle
Murder in Greenwich: Who Killed Martha Moxley?

Libraries taking more steps to find overdue books

Overdue books have become quite a problem. Have a look Here. From the The News-Journal Online.

Books about Jesse James ride off library shelves into the sunset, while patrons who borrow wedding etiquette manuals often rudely fail to return the book after the ceremony. \"All kinds of books are not returned. But the ones that really don\'t come back are pregnancy and childbirth, wedding etiquette,witchcraft, cults or that type of thing,\" said Elizabeth Potts, director of the Maury County Library System. \"Jack the Ripper, anything on Jesse James, you can forget.\"

100 Best Scottish Books of All Time

This Thursday, to coincide with World Book Day, culture minister Patricia Ferguson will begin the hunt. At a glittering ceremony, the minister will unveil a guide compiled with the Scottish Book Trust and the List magazine to the 100 Best Scottish Books of All Time and invite the public to start voting for their favourite work from the list.
But the campaign has run into controversy just days before it has begun after a draft list obtained by Scotland On Sunday shows a number of peculiar omissions and inclusions.
The winner will be announced at the Edinburgh International Book Festival in August but if you think the arguments will end there, forget it – with only one book allowed per author, the tome in question might not even be on Maley’s list. Who’s to say that Welsh’s Marabou Stork Nightmares won’t be preferred to Trainspotting? And who can discount the Harry Potter factor? Barry Didcock Says There could be a few red faces in Charlotte Square come August.

Controversy colors teen book

Anonymous Patron writes "USATODAY.com Rainbow Party, aimed at the teen market (ages 14 and up), has some booksellers and librarians wondering whether author Paul Ruditis sensationalizes the subject — and, more significantly, whether they should carry it on their shelves."

Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived?

Anonymous Patron writes "Over @Slate, Stephen Metcalf asks Uncle Tom's Children - Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived? We have here an interesting puzzle. How has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived, and thrived, if it proved so offensive to the 20th-century aspirations of the African-Americans it helped liberate in the 19th? Why isn't Uncle Tom's Cabin like Wittgenstein's ladder: Once climbed, it is obsolete, and we ought to throw it away?
The answer, he believes, can be found in an essay from 1978 by Jane Tompkins, a prominent feminist literary critic"

NS tale slays Atwood giant in Canada Reads

slashgirl writes "'Rockbound, a 1928 novel by little-known author Frank Parker Day, has emerged victorious in CBC's annual Canada Reads book battle.'

'In a classic David-and-Goliath confrontation, Rockbound defeated Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake, a heavy-hitter that has been nominated for some of the world's most prestigious literary prizes over the past two years, including the Orange, Booker and Giller prizes. The dystopian novel is also currently competing for the 2005 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.'

Rest of the story here."

Creating a global online library will spread knowledge in the quickest way to the most people

Strong Words Of Praise for the Google library project from Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan. She says beyond the emerging legal challenges, we must not lose sight of the transformative nature of Google's plan -- or the good that can come from it. "Imagine what this means for scholars, school kids and you, who, until now, might have discovered only a fraction of the material written on any subject. Or picture a small, impoverished school -- in America or anywhere in the world -- that does not have access to a substantial library but does have an Internet connection."

Bed Books: Lie Down And Read

BedBooks is a company that prints sideways books. "The revolutionary way Bed Books are printed will enable you to lie in any comfortable position and hold the book at an angle that works best for you." You can Print A Page [PDF] to see just how they work. They offer books like Alice in Wonderland, The Call of the Wild and Wuthering Heights.

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