Books

Volumes of Verse Help Children Mark National Poetry Month

Ellen Freilich, a writer for Reuters
has written this
article
for National Poetry Month.

\"April is National Poetry Month, a perfect excuse, if one is needed, to put aside prose and visit
some verse. To help young people observe the occasion, publishers offer an intriguing variety of new
and classic poetry books.\". -- Read More

Putting the I in IT

Frank Ryan writes:


The quote below is part of the introduction to a recently published book
entitled \"Mastering Information Management\" from the Financial Times. It is
a great opening to a \"milestone\" book ...
Putting the I in IT by Thomas H. Davenport

\"Imagine a world obsessed with plumbing. In this bizarre place, hundreds of
magazines and books, and even a few television channels, cover the plumbing
industry, celebrating the latest advances in valves, fixtures and pipes.
Cocktail party conversation is dominated by the issue of whether one brand
of sink drains faster than another. Plumbing equipment magnates are on the
cover of business and even general interest publications, and become the
world\'s richest citizens. Companies pay millions, billions, trillions to
connect all their plumbing devices and to ensure that pipes reach every
desktop, every home office, even every car.

\" -- Read More

Judge rules two library books are child pornography

The Union Tribune ,in San Diego, is Reporting Judge William Kennedy, at the conclusion of a one-day, nonjury trial, ruled that the photographs depicting naked young girls in provocative poses constituted child pornography. Bruce Johnson, the arts, music and recreation supervisor at the library, said police at times have requested to see the slips to determine who is viewing books of this genre, but the library has always refused to share the information.

\"It\'s a private transaction,\" he said. -- Read More

Great time to be a librarian

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes:It may be a still be a great time to be a publisher or a librarian, despite all the problems, it seems.

Jason Epstein has a fascinating article that parallels the recent \'Great Time to Be a Librarian\' thread on PubLib (see digests 1233 to 1236 at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/PubLib/

Epstein\'s article is on the future of the book publishing business and it is titled \'The Rattle of Pebbles.\'It can be found in the New York Review of Books; Volume XLVII, Number 7; Cover Date: April 27, 2000. It is on also the web at:
http://www.nybooks.com/nyrev/index.html
Says Epstein: \"Twenty years ago when my children and their friends came of age I advised them to shun the publishing business. Today I would offer young people, the opposite advice. The transformation that awaits them foreshadows cultural ramifications that can hardly be imagined but that promise a lifetime of creative adventure...\" -- Read More

Book clubs coming back

A Story from the Binghamton Press has good things to say about book clubs.

\"This week is Turn Off TV Week. Reading is something where everyone can use their life experiences and enjoy an alternative to television,\" said Melanie Battoe, library director at the Guernsey Memorial Library in Norwich. Battoe started a book review group at the library Friday with a noon brown-bag discussion of Memoirs of a Geisha . This fall, she plans a monthly mystery book group. -- Read More

Books on Demand

Yahoo News picked up This Story on Bookstores where customers pick out titles and have them printed in minutes. It would be like having an unlimited number of books in stock. Combine this with an E-Book reader and your library could put together an impressive collection in no time! -- Read More

Annual Who Reads What? Celebrity Reading List

The Gardiner Public Library has published their \"Who Reads What?\" survey of celebrity book picks.Gary J. Remal, Faith Hill, Christina Ricci, Nolan Ryan and others are on the list. -- Read More

Internet kills off oldest bookshop

The Times
UK
is reporting in a Very Short Story
that the worlds oldest bookstore, JOHN Smith & Son in
Glasgow\'s West End is closing thanks to competition
from online giants such as Amazon and BN.com.

The firm was founded in 1751 by John Smith, the
youngest son of the Laird of Craigend, who opened a
shop on Trongate selling books, snuff and coffee to
Glasgow\'s tobacco merchants. -- Read More

First e-ditions of e-books

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes \"Three things have made the news lately that brought parts of the web to a halt:
the hacker attacks on Yahoo,
Brittanica\'s launch as a free online encyclopedia,
and Stephen King\'s e-book \"Riding the Dollar - oops I mean- Bullet.\"

Isn\'t it nice, in a way, that two of the three were book related?

But I have a serious concern! :-)

What will happen to collectors? How does one get a first edition of an e-book? King may have missed an historic chance here! Why didn\'t he and the publishers issue a first edition for e-book collectors? -- Read More

OED is online

If you have $800us (US$550 at home) to burn you can now subscribe to the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

They do have The Word of the Day for free. Today is RELIC. They promise to add an incredible number of new words to the online version.

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