Books

New words (and a few odd ones too) in the new dictionary

This article from the Columbus Dispatch describes a few new words and phrases that will appear in a revision of the Random House Webster\'s College Dictionary. Included are \"Arm Candy\", \"Eye Candy\", \"Senior Moment\", and \"DWB\" (Driving While Black)\"DWB (driving while black) was added as a reference to racial profiling. The term is used sarcastically to describe the reason why police have stopped black motorists. Merriam-Webster added big time (something done on a large scale) this year. ATV (all-terrain vehicle) and smoothie (a creamy drink) also were added.\" -- Read More

The wonderfuld world of pop-ups

Bob Cox has sent in many a link over these past few
months, but this has got to be the coolest. North TX U
Library
has an online display of Pop-Up and
Moveable books.
Check out the website
, the images move, just like
the
books. They go back as far as 1811, many fine
examples.

Science Group Bemoans Book Quality

Reginald A writes :

I just read the ED Week July 12 Article \"Science Group Bemoans Quality of
Biology Textbooks\"
and was thinking that
the findings of the AAAS Project 2061 were spot on: that textbooks and the
general math and science curricula were \"a mile wide and an inch deep.\"


Clearly this is an area where a library could work in partnership with a
school system. Of course, policy drives this sort of thing...that\'s why the
curricula and the textbooks are in the shape they are. Still, those school
systems - or individual teachers - who are willing and able to draw on the
expertise of the library, could add some sorely-needed depth to a math and
science program. -- Read More

Technology Shrinks Library

School libraries are in a quandry these days as budgets have not been increased, yet they are expected to buy books and computers. The solution is not an easy one. Check out this article by the Shreeveport Times.\"The push by school administrators to buy technology is leaving many of the nation’s school libraries with thin and outdated book inventories.\" -- Read More

Reading habit has declined in Sri Lanka

This Story tells us reading is declining in Sri Lanka due to lack of interest in reading and leisure. Is this happening in other countries?

\"The survey was conducted under the direction of Cultural and Religious Affairs Ministry. The report on the survey says that 63.7 per cent admitted that their reading habit has dropped. Most Sri Lankans are monolingual. Their principal language of communication is Sinhala, only 16.1 percent of them could read English and 0.9 percent Tamil. Of those who consider Tamil as their principle language of communication 35.4 percent could read Sinhala and 4.8 percent English. -- Read More

The Throwaway Libraries

Asia Week has this nice story on schools in the Philippines that get second and third hand books sent to them from America. The students love it, and so do I. Way to go!!\"In DDU schools, all the students have to read are worn-out books and mimeographed materials, with hardly any pictures or color. The library is a single, dilapidated shelf in a poorly lit room, and the several dozen books in it are under lock and key.\" -- Read More

Library art books destroyed

MassLive has a sad, sad, Story on books being trashed and thrased at the Forbes Library.

\"According to library director Blaise Bisaillon, dozens of volumes of art, photography and music books have been vandalized over the last 10 months by an unknown assailant. -- Read More

Publishing House donated to University

Cabot writes
\"Canadian publishing company McClelland and
Stewart was donated by owner Avie Bennett to the
University of Toronto. Bennett is donating 75% of the
company\'s shares to the university. The remaining 25%
was sold to Random House.
Infoculture.cbc.ca
\"

\"
U of T President Robert Prichard says the publisher will
be completely independent and will have no
relationship with the University of Toronto Press. Any
income received from ownership of the shares will be
used to fund an endowment in support of Canadian
writing and culture.\"

Canadian Heritage Committee Issues Report on Book

Cabot writes \"The Heritage Committee of the Canadian House of Commons has issued its report on the book industry. Of note is the chapter on libraries, preservation and access. Among the recommendations are:

- the Department of Canadian Heritage develop and fund a set of comprehensive tools for measuring the activities of libraries in the form of valid and up-to-date statistics relating to library funding, library spending and library usage by Canadians, including print-disabled Canadians.

- Government of Canada, in conjunction with the provinces and in discussion with the
library community, Canada\'s publishers, wholesalers and booksellers, offer incentives for Canadian libraries to purchase more of their books from Canadian suppliers.

- Government of Canada provide additional funding to the National Library of Canada, beginning in the fiscal year 2000-2001, so that its AMICUS services (the union catalogue) may be provided at no cost to its users.

The Report can be found on-line at:
parl.gc.ca \"

Books Unbound, Life Unraveled

John Updike has written a fantastic op-ed piece for the New York Times about the sanctity of books what he would miss if they cease to exist.\"...already much of the written communication that used to be handled by letters, newspapers and magazines has shifted to computer screens and to the vast digital library available over the Internet. If the worst comes true, and the paper book joins the papyrus scroll and parchment codex in extinction, we will miss, I predict, a number of things about it.\" -- Read More

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