Books

Book Publishing Quickies

I have accumulated more than a few Book / Publishing Industry related stories, so here they are...

Scholastic creates new online lesson plan the folks that bring you Harry Potter has a new web site that includes lesson plans and Web-page builders for teachers as well as education information for parents.

Conflicted Copy Rights is a three-part series on how royalty fees and payments for copyrighted works are established.

The Right to Read is an interesting look at the future, one version of the future.

A few more follow... -- Read More

No phony birthday parties for \'Catcher in the Rye\'

The Buffalo News has a little article about the \"Catcher in the Rye\"turning 50!

NEW YORK - This year marks the 50th anniversary of J.D. Salinger\'s \"The Catcher in the Rye.\" But don\'t expect to hear that from his publisher.\"

Britannica Does Britney

Wired has a Story on britannica.com and the \"spicy\" content designed to appeal to the young-and-bookish set.

\"Interestingly, we seem to be attracting more single people in their 20s than in the past,\" said Jocelyn Turpin, executive producer at Britannica.com. \"The shift is partially the result of the more grownup features we\'ve developed.\"

Bjork, yes; Britney, no

Brian writes \"The Chicago Tribune has a Meaty Article about the New Grove II. It\'s refreshing that the online version of NG2 isn\'t even mentioned until halfway through. The 29-volume set puts more emphasis on popular and world music than the old edition; it doesn\'t mention Britney Spears, but Icelandic song goddess Bjork is covered. \"We had quite a lively internal debate about whether to include the Spice Girls,\" an editor says.

\"

Questioning the Newberry List

E.J. Graff Has Written an interesting look at The Newberry\'s on Salon.
he says the Newbery medal treated as nearly infallible, the Newbery medalists as the \"boring\" books, the same books that stayed on display at the library because no one checked them out. No one who reads for pleasure and challenge and joy would willingly subject themselves to such demeaningly tedious books.

\"Far too many parents, crazy with anxiety about raising their children right, hand off their judgment to experts ranging from Dr. Spock to Dr. Brazelton, from Parenting magazine to the Newbery medal.\"

Books in Retrogression

I love this quote from Arts & Letters Daily about the book publishing industry.
\"Once upon a time, the major American publishing houses could be counted on to bring controversial new ideas, trenchant political criticism, and works of enduring literary merit to the reading public. No longer. Instead, we get a steady stream of diet books, celebrity biographies, quasi-spiritual self-help manuals, formulaic technothrillers, Jacqueline Susann knock-offs, and warmed-over tabloid journalism about the scandal of the moment.\"

One may or may not easily argue the accuracy of such a statement, depending on reading tastes and also given the fact that a trip to the library or to the closest bookstore, whether it be physical or virtual, will yield quality literature aplenty for someone. The saga continues at The American Prospect

Publishers of Texts With Errors Pay Up

The Houston Chronicle has a Story in which said Sarah Wahl, head librarian for the Goose Creek Independent School District says the publishers of those 12 textbooks that are full of errors should receive stiffer fines in an effort to curtail mistakes. A recent legislative change allowed the State Board of Education to levy fines totaling $80,500 against nine textbook publishers last year for failing to correct errors.

Laura Bush, first lady of literacy

Salon.com has an Interview with Stanley Crouch, who read his stuff at the big presidential Inauguration in D.C.

\"Look, I\'m fairly sure [Laura Bush] is going to be doing things connected to literacy, making books available, teaching kids how to read -- literature is one thing, but reading is another, and those of us currently paying our rent as writers would probably be better off anyway if there were more focus on literacy rather than on celebrating professional authors.\"

Is nothing sacred?

Salon has a rather Interesting Story on Peggy Kamuf, a professor at the University of Southern California, insists that teaching kids to read initiates them into the patriarchal construct of the family unit and society at large, and learning to read is brutal and painful rite of passage.

She says learning to read is violent.

ALA Award Winners

Richard Peck, author of \"A Year Down Yonder,\" and David Small, illustrator of \"So You Want To Be President?\" are the 2001 winners of the John Newbery and Randolph Caldecott Medals, the most prestigious awards in children\'s literature. -- Read More

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