Books

Barney has Been a Bad Dinosaur

Librarians and Parents beware. As this article from the New York Post states, Barney the Dinosaur books have been found in New York which contain hidden pornography.
\"The discoveries in Putnam County and on Staten Island are similar to that of a Long Island tot who found a picture of a topless woman and steamy massage instructions in French underneath an electronic music box glued to the book.\" -- Read More

Books on Tape - Mind Candy or Enrichment?

The Los Angeles Times has this interesting article on books on tape. Its critics say that they are \"mind-candy\" which does not assist in making better readers.
\"That\'s the feeling of Willy Ackerman, an English teacher at Kennedy High School in Granada Hills. Although she may read a few passages of a book out loud to her students, Ackerman said the best way to master reading is to read. \"Difficult reading helps us to become better readers,\" she said. \"Easy reading helps us to become faster readers. That\'s how you improve.\"
The article also discusses audio books in schools. -- Read More

Small Booksellers Seek Browsers Online

The New York Times carried this article on independant booksellers\' quests to compete in the online world.
\"Nearly half the independent booksellers have disappeared since 1994, according to the American Booksellers Association. Now the Internet, the site of so much recent loss for the independents, will take on greater importance as a battleground in the next two months.\" -- Read More

Spurned by wife, man gives up pulp fiction library

The Times of India has this article about a man who had to choose between his laundry and his 25,000 Pulp Fiction book collection.
\"My wife gave me an ultimatum,\" he recalls. \"She said, \'I can\'t get to the washer and dryer. You have to make a decision between the books and clean clothes.\" The books are now at the University at Buffalo\'s Lockwood Library. Five years after Kelley donated them to his alma mater, librarians have catalogued each volume.\" -- Read More

Audio books are turning new leaf

The Chicago Tribune has another Story on the increaing popularity of Audio Books. Audio Books have become the fastest-growing segment of the book industry.Are they being offered in your library?
Are they being Used? -- Read More

New Chapter on Bookstores

Omaha.com has an interesting Series of articles from a columnist on the battle between the small book stores and Barnes & Noble and Borders. She took some heat for her columns, they are a good read.

\"\"\"You are the killer of businesses,\" one man wrote. People like me are on the increase, he said. \"They are the people who take advantage of the hospitality the businesses offer, complain when they can\'t get more, read and wear out a book, then walk out without purchasing anything.\" -- Read More

Audio Books are Turning New Leaf in Publishing

The Chicago Tribune has this article on the flourishing of audio books.
\"...audio books, like electronic books, are redefining cultural attitudes toward reading. They are even becoming the first medium for some titles, whether because they\'re controversial or aimed at a special audience more likely to \"read\" a book in that form than curled up in an armchair with a bound title.\" -- Read More

Summer Reading Clubs around the corner

Memorial Day is considered the official start of the summer season. Here are two articles on summer reading for kids;
One from the Post Gazette and another from the Oklahoman. -- Read More

Don\'t judge book by its skin

In a strange blending of art and promotion, a special
edition of a forthcoming book by a controversial
Newfoundland author will contain pieces of his own
skin. The
National Post
up in Canada, has The Story. -- Read More

Superstores Hurting Literary Books

Is it possible that people are buying more \"Trash\" Than ever? According to this Story from The Worldly Investor they sure are, and it\'s all the big stores fault.

\"``The dramatic advent of superstores and online booksellers has made the book business more like the rest of consumer retailing: There is a smaller number of bigger winners than there used to be,\'\' said author Nicholas Lemann, chair of the guild\'s Midlist Study Group.\" -- Read More

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