Books

Reading habit has declined in Sri Lanka

This Story tells us reading is declining in Sri Lanka due to lack of interest in reading and leisure. Is this happening in other countries?

\"The survey was conducted under the direction of Cultural and Religious Affairs Ministry. The report on the survey says that 63.7 per cent admitted that their reading habit has dropped. Most Sri Lankans are monolingual. Their principal language of communication is Sinhala, only 16.1 percent of them could read English and 0.9 percent Tamil. Of those who consider Tamil as their principle language of communication 35.4 percent could read Sinhala and 4.8 percent English. -- Read More

The Throwaway Libraries

Asia Week has this nice story on schools in the Philippines that get second and third hand books sent to them from America. The students love it, and so do I. Way to go!!\"In DDU schools, all the students have to read are worn-out books and mimeographed materials, with hardly any pictures or color. The library is a single, dilapidated shelf in a poorly lit room, and the several dozen books in it are under lock and key.\" -- Read More

Library art books destroyed

MassLive has a sad, sad, Story on books being trashed and thrased at the Forbes Library.

\"According to library director Blaise Bisaillon, dozens of volumes of art, photography and music books have been vandalized over the last 10 months by an unknown assailant. -- Read More

Publishing House donated to University

Cabot writes
\"Canadian publishing company McClelland and
Stewart was donated by owner Avie Bennett to the
University of Toronto. Bennett is donating 75% of the
company\'s shares to the university. The remaining 25%
was sold to Random House.
Infoculture.cbc.ca
\"

\"
U of T President Robert Prichard says the publisher will
be completely independent and will have no
relationship with the University of Toronto Press. Any
income received from ownership of the shares will be
used to fund an endowment in support of Canadian
writing and culture.\"

Canadian Heritage Committee Issues Report on Book

Cabot writes \"The Heritage Committee of the Canadian House of Commons has issued its report on the book industry. Of note is the chapter on libraries, preservation and access. Among the recommendations are:

- the Department of Canadian Heritage develop and fund a set of comprehensive tools for measuring the activities of libraries in the form of valid and up-to-date statistics relating to library funding, library spending and library usage by Canadians, including print-disabled Canadians.

- Government of Canada, in conjunction with the provinces and in discussion with the
library community, Canada\'s publishers, wholesalers and booksellers, offer incentives for Canadian libraries to purchase more of their books from Canadian suppliers.

- Government of Canada provide additional funding to the National Library of Canada, beginning in the fiscal year 2000-2001, so that its AMICUS services (the union catalogue) may be provided at no cost to its users.

The Report can be found on-line at:
parl.gc.ca \"

Books Unbound, Life Unraveled

John Updike has written a fantastic op-ed piece for the New York Times about the sanctity of books what he would miss if they cease to exist.\"...already much of the written communication that used to be handled by letters, newspapers and magazines has shifted to computer screens and to the vast digital library available over the Internet. If the worst comes true, and the paper book joins the papyrus scroll and parchment codex in extinction, we will miss, I predict, a number of things about it.\" -- Read More

Anal Retentive? Or Just a Love of Books

When I first started serious reading, I would always wash my hands before I would pick up my current book. I would also flex out the pages so as not to create a crease in the spine, and dog-eared pages....don\'t get me started. After reading this article from the Chicago Tribune, I felt at ease in knowing that I was not the only one.
\"I am the sort who reads a paperback at about 120 degrees open, rather than a flat-out 180. I wash my hands before I pick up any book other than a mass market paperback that I am merely toying with. And, as I am sure my grade-school librarians, Mrs. DeMers and Mrs. Hjelmseth, would be delighted to learn, I have never forgotten to carefully break in a new book.\" -- Read More

world\'s tiniest book

Mass Live has a cool littel Story on the world\'d tiniest book. Finally a book that a librarian can use to keep track of the tiny salary he/she makes!


It measures 1/2-inch by 5/16-inch, and is most likely the smallest hand-bound book in the world. Don\'t keep it in Ready Reference. -- Read More

Holy MP3

You can now download an MP3 version of The Bible online. You can get it at Audiotreasure.com.

Wired has an Interview with the guy who did it.

Limits on books in prison upheld

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinal published this article about the amount of books that inmates in segregation are allowed to have with them at one time. The inmates said that the rule (which said that they can only have three) violated their first amendment rights. They won the case, but the appeals court disagreed, and it was over-ruled.
\"The center\'s inmates, who are segregated for violating prison disciplinary rules, can only have three state-issued paperback books in addition to their own religious book, such as a Bible or Qur\'an.\" -- Read More

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