Books

Go Read

Diane Writes:\"Feb. 2001\'s Against the Grain has an
interesting article by Anthony W. Ferguson. He recommends that libarians
read Blown to bits by Phillip Evans and Thomas S. Wurster (Harvard
Business School Press, 2000) for the lessons offered.

\"They use the
near-collapse of Britannica as a case study in the perils of being the
established leader in any given sector of society.\"

Ferguson draws
parallels for libraries from the study and offers some solutions to our
digital dilemmas.

Winners of Writers Guild Awards Announced

Kenneth Lonergan, author of the sibling-reunion tale \"You Can Count On Me,\" won a top honor from The Writers Guild of America. He won for best screenplay based on material written specifically for the screen. [more...] from The Nando Times...

Happy Birthday Theodor Geisel!

The National Education Association (NEA) has designated today as \"Read Across America\" day.


There was a funny story on NPR this morning on the crazy things school principals are doing to get their kids to read. They are kissing Llamma\'s, snakes, and being duct taped to the wall, if the kids read enough books.

Indie Book Sellers Are Back

Wired has an Audio Story that says Independent booksellers are regaining ground on the mega-retailers both in stores and online, with a stong and devoted following.

Gutenberg Not The First

Could it be that Gutenberg was not the first to market with the printing press?

Paul Needham and Blaise Aguera y Arcas (library folks at Princeton University) think he may not have been the first.

It seems like more of a technicality to me, but Read The Full Story from National Geographic and decide for yourself.

Short Story Dispensing Machines

Lee Hadden writes:
\"The Wall Street Journal has an interesting story of an entrepreneur
who has placed \"reading vending machines\" in the London Underground to sell
short stories to commuters. The stories are packaged like folded maps, and
can be read easily in a crowded subway car. The cost is one pound each
(about $1.50), and are designed so the average reader would spend about 40
minutes reading the story.
At the Baker Street Station, for example, are short stories about
Sherlock Holmes. Elementary, of course. Backers claim there is massive
potential in this market, and others claim it is the best new idea in
publishing since the paperback book. The backers of the new service want to
end the practice of commuters reading tabloids on the train.
Their website is: travelman.co.uk.


Wade Lambert. \"Publisher Puts Story Machine in London Tube.\" Wall
Street Journal. February 22, 2001, page B1, B4.

Is Oprah\'s Book Club About More Than Feel Good Hype?

Alfred Kazin, writing in The Los Angeles Times, called Oprah\'s Book Club the \"carpet bombing of the American mind.\" Some critics disagree...
[more...]

Help needed from Librarians to complete book project

Godfrey Oswald writes \"Dear Librarians

I am near the final completion of a major project, to update the
Info Connect List of LIS Records 1999.

This is a factual reference book (first published in 1997), of the
major records on libraries, information science and librarianship,
akin to the \"Guinness Book of Records\".

It includes such records as, the oldest university library in the
world,the most expensive library in the world, the largest public
library in Europe, the 100 largest and important libraries in the
world, the first CD-ROM database.

The new edition is to be called \"The Book of Library Records\"
and is to be made available in book printed and electronic version.

I am seeking information on any new entries to add to the new edition.

Here is how you can help me.... -- Read More

PUBLIB Best Books of 2000

PUBLIB has posted the PUBLIB Best Books of 2000 (Favorite books read, but not necessarily written, in 2000).

All the titles were contributed by PUBLIB members.

A few titles include, Paco Underhill Why We Buy , Anne Elizabeth Simon The Real Science Behind the X-Files , and Miles Harvey The Island of Lost Maps .

Book Publishing Quickies

I have accumulated more than a few Book / Publishing Industry related stories, so here they are...

Scholastic creates new online lesson plan the folks that bring you Harry Potter has a new web site that includes lesson plans and Web-page builders for teachers as well as education information for parents.

Conflicted Copy Rights is a three-part series on how royalty fees and payments for copyrighted works are established.

The Right to Read is an interesting look at the future, one version of the future.

A few more follow... -- Read More

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