Books

National Book Festival Announced for September

Someone from the Associated Press writes...

\"The first National Book Festival, sponsored by the Library of Congress, will be held Sept. 8, first lady Laura Bush said Monday. The event, whose hosts will include Mrs. Bush and Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, will be modeled after similar events she sponsored as first lady in Texas. \'I believe that every American should have the sense of adventure and satisfaction that comes from reading a good book -- and, I might add, a good newspaper article,\' she said.\" more... from NewsFlash.
Here\'s still more from CNN.

An ATM for books

I\'m not sure if it has an application in the library world, but, the \'ATM for books\' is eight feet long, 38 inches wide, it can produce a book in 12 minutes, and costs $82,000. The MTI PerfectBook-080 machine could change book stores as we know them. Instead of allowing books to go out of print, you can store them as digital files and publish them \"on demand\" in bookstores, while customers wait, using self-contained book printers.

Does something like this have a place in a library?

Digital Mass Has The Story

Traditional publishing\'s latest horror story

Cliff writes \"This is an interesting article especially because it suggests some interesting ideas on how this technology will or could be used. It\'s too bad publishers find this a threat rather than think of it as a business opportunity, but perhaps that\'s the bias of this article\'s writer. This kind of tech will make trees more endangered than ever, as books can join the ranks of \"throwaway\" status if this technology becomes widespread. One can imagine some publishers priting very cheap copies of books, meant to be thrown away (trashy novels, for example?)

Full Story from Digital Mass \"

The Average Reader Doesn\'t Care About Quality

Newspapers are dissing book reviews. Reasons cited are \"the average reader really doesn\'t care about quality.\" I wonder, according to whom? One editor says \"book review sections only appeal to a small, elite, older readership.\" Ya don\'t say... The article also goes on to say that \"newspaper editors don\'t read books.\" Now, that doesn\'t surprise me. [more...] from Salon.

20 Minutes of Reading a Day is a Great Place to Start

From The Ames, (NV) Tribune, Marlys Barker writes...

\"Reading and the local library were so much a part of my childhood that I can\'t imagine what my childhood would have been if I hadn\'t enjoyed reading or been able to read.\" [more...]

What We Have Is a Deteriorating Habit of Book Reading

Juan P. Dayang, President of the Publishers Association of the Philippines, Inc. and governor of the National Book Development Board, recently posed a challenge to the Filipano nation to increase a love of reading. With well over a 97% literacy rate, a high percentage of those people just don\'t want to read. \"Sadly, we say that we have today a deteriorating habit of book reading which has resulted in lesser quality of education ... The relevance of books and, of course, readership, could not perhaps be equated with anything else in the making of civilized societies. Books are the fundamental tools of man in acquiring new and wider experiences to enrich his existence.\" [more...] from Manila Bulletin.

State Issues 2,700 Title Book List for Student Reading

For The San Francisco Chronicle, Nannette Asimov writes...

\"Once upon a time, a dozen years ago, California\'s leading educators declared that students would do well to read certain books. A list was prepared, but it languished and was soon forgotten. Then along came education standards -- new levels of excellence that students were supposed to meet -- and new money for school libraries, $158.5 million per year. Today, a new list of 2,700 books recommended by state educators appears on the Web, searchable by title, author, awards garnered and even cultural specificity. Click on the title, and a summary appears. The result is an easy-to-use guide for school librarians, teachers, parents and students looking for good books.\"
[more...]

English dictionary recognizes text messages

ZDNet Says the Concise
Oxford Dictionary has decided to include the shorthand
language in its revised edition published on Thursday.
Examples that have found a place in the dictionary
include BBLR (be back later) and
HAND (have a nice day). They are joined by
emoticons--representations of facial
expressions such as :) and :(.

Mend Those Bindings

Bella
Online
has This
Story
in Book Mending, Information on tools and
technique for this essential task for librarians and
others who care for books.
It\'s a neat look at book repair, and and the
Mending materials it takes to make your sick books all
better.

\"During mine own education the assistant dean
asked what courses we would like to see offered
during the interim semester (these were mini, one
credit courses). The overwhelming response was,
\"book repair.\" \"

Religious books: Divine popularity

CNN has This Story on sales of religious books being up more than 4 percent.
They say it\'s not just Christian-oriented books that are selling so well, but any religious books tend to be doing well.
Does anyone keep circulation numbers on this type of book, are they up as well?

\"The more suspicious people are of their local church, then the more apt they are to just assemble their own books, to assemble their own spiritual life,\"

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