Books

Cliff Notes in The Library

Lee Hadden writes:
\"Bob Levey, a popular columnist in Washington DC, has an account of finding that the local public library has copies of Cliff\'s Notes in their collection.
Read more about it at The Washington Post\"

The library did say they buy three to four times as many \"real books\" as CliffsNotes and they are \"not as popular as the books themselves. They\'re not widely used.\"

Books, Books Everywhere the Books

More than a few book stories clogging up my favorites here

The E-Book Revolution? from over at BookWire calls the the eBook industry\'s hype a bit off base.

The NYTimes has This Story on a campaign by more than 1,200 independent bookstores called BookSense.

Meanwhile, in Australia, Retailers told to move as books giant sets up shop, if you can\'t beat\'m, move.

In CA a federal court judge in Northern California dismissed a group of Independent Bookstores claim to damages yesterday in an antitrust suit against Barnes & Noble and the Borders Group. Full Story -- Read More

Move Over Harry Potter, There\'s a New Kid in Town

His name is Artemis Fowl, and this 12-year-old kids\' book character has already made a mint — and literary history — for his creator, Irish author Eoin Colfer. [more...]

Bookshops are closing. Hurrah

I know someone who will not like This Story from The Gaurdian on small bookshops in Britain. The author says the reason so many of them are closing is they can\'t provide the service big stores can, and they deserve to go out of business. Independent book retailers in Britain has fallen from 1,894 to 1,699 since 1995.

He says \"The amazing fact is not that 10% have closed, but that 90% have stayed open.\"

Reading Is Cool

Bob Cox sent along This Story from SF Gate on Adobe Books in San Fransico. Sounds like quite a place.

\"Used bookstores, like cockfights, tend to attract a rather motley crowd of gawkers and hucksters, those seeking to broaden their own horizons by latching onto the matted feathers of someone else\'s life experience.\"

Go Read

Diane Writes:\"Feb. 2001\'s Against the Grain has an
interesting article by Anthony W. Ferguson. He recommends that libarians
read Blown to bits by Phillip Evans and Thomas S. Wurster (Harvard
Business School Press, 2000) for the lessons offered.

\"They use the
near-collapse of Britannica as a case study in the perils of being the
established leader in any given sector of society.\"

Ferguson draws
parallels for libraries from the study and offers some solutions to our
digital dilemmas.

Winners of Writers Guild Awards Announced

Kenneth Lonergan, author of the sibling-reunion tale \"You Can Count On Me,\" won a top honor from The Writers Guild of America. He won for best screenplay based on material written specifically for the screen. [more...] from The Nando Times...

Happy Birthday Theodor Geisel!

The National Education Association (NEA) has designated today as \"Read Across America\" day.


There was a funny story on NPR this morning on the crazy things school principals are doing to get their kids to read. They are kissing Llamma\'s, snakes, and being duct taped to the wall, if the kids read enough books.

Indie Book Sellers Are Back

Wired has an Audio Story that says Independent booksellers are regaining ground on the mega-retailers both in stores and online, with a stong and devoted following.

Gutenberg Not The First

Could it be that Gutenberg was not the first to market with the printing press?

Paul Needham and Blaise Aguera y Arcas (library folks at Princeton University) think he may not have been the first.

It seems like more of a technicality to me, but Read The Full Story from National Geographic and decide for yourself.

Syndicate content