Books

First Seattle, Now the World (Toronto to Read One Book)

The Toronto Star reports that Toronto\'s librarian\'s are planning to follow Chicago\'s lead. The first idea Toronto borrowed from Chicago was the cows.
Although the program could begin as soon as next year, the mayor has yet to embrace the program and no book has been chosen.
Credit for the original idea goes to the Washington Center for the Book. See also...

The Giver Won\'t be Found in These Public Schools

The Aurura, (CO) Public School System is avoiding the controversy over Lois Lowry\'s \"The Giver,\" altogether. According to a spokesperson for the school district, \"That book is not included in any curriculum within the district,\" Lynch said. \"As far as I know, it\'s not even in any media centers.\" more... from The Aurora Sentinel.

Making books with the obsessed

Jill passed along This SFWeekly Story on the San Francisco Center for the Book, a nonprofit gallery/schoolhouse/studio in Potrero Hill. The center supports the book arts -- that is, letterpress printing, typography, bookbinding, ya know, stuff that librarians just looooove

\"Most people simply read books, but I like to smell them. New books are the best: Slightly sweet and enticingly chemical, they reek of glue and ink and other mysterious binding fluids.\"

Fan mags for bookworms

jen writes \"It\'s the novelist-as-celebrity.There\'s a new group of magazines with a new target audience. Readers. Book readers. Basically, the magazines try to avoid the sleepy, antiquarian end of literature while still extolling bookstores, book fairs, book stars and, of course, books. This is book culture as pop culture.\" -- Too bad they don\'t also extol public libraries. And who knew that Keith Richards had a mahogany-trimmed library? \"

Full Story from SLToday.com

\"We treat authors and books as another part of the entertainment industry -- just the way Spin or Rolling Stone or even Golf Digest cover their respective fields.\"

More On BookScan

Slate has Another Story on BookScan the sales-tracking system that can currently find the exact number of copies sold at about 50 percent of U.S. bookstores.
Current Best Seller lists aren\'t really lists of the best selling books, so it\'ll be interesting to see how much the lists change when we really know what people are buying. They say publishers are already hyperventilating with fear.


See Also: The Fact and Fiction of Best Sellers Lists. by Dennis Loy Johnson.

Rare library book finally returned after 88 years

Charles Davis writes \"From
Ananova Story
Originally from
Boston.com


A first edition of Charles Darwin\'s Origin of the Species
stolen from a library at least 88 years ago has been
returned.
The book, published in 1859, could be worth around
£15,000. It was taken back to Boston Public Library by Julie
Geissler, who was left it by her great aunt Hester Hastings.
\"

Two Mockingbirds with one stone

To Kill a Mockingbird is Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley\'s favorite book, and the Chicago Public Library is trying to get everyone in the city to read it.

In other Mockingbird news, the book has been pulled off the freshman reading list at a high school in Oklahoma. The principal sez, "We didn\'t want to put any kids in an uncomfortable situation."

Armed Robbers Steal Book - Library Gets It Back 2 Years Later

Junk e-mail goddess strikes again...

\"Someone writes...

\"From the Associated Press (Northern Ireland)- A prized first edition of Jonathan Swift\'s \"Gulliver\'s Travels\" was returned Thursday to Armagh Public Library nearly two years after armed robbers stole the 273-year-old volume.\" more... from Excite News.

Rare Darwin Book Returned to Boston Public Library

From the junk e-mail goddess...
Someone writes...

\"A rare first-edition copy of Charles Darwin\'s seminal work on natural selection has been returned to the Boston Public Library after disappearing at least eight decades ago.
An 1859 copy of Darwin\'s \"On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection\" was returned last week after a woman found the book while cleaning out a relative\'s home, Roberta Zonghi, the library\'s keeper of rare books, said on Wednesday. The library received the book in the 1860s as a gift, Zonghi said. The library noted that the book was missing in 1933, but it could have vanished a decade earlier.\" more...
The folks at ABCNews have this one

National Book Festival Announced for September

Someone from the Associated Press writes...

\"The first National Book Festival, sponsored by the Library of Congress, will be held Sept. 8, first lady Laura Bush said Monday. The event, whose hosts will include Mrs. Bush and Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, will be modeled after similar events she sponsored as first lady in Texas. \'I believe that every American should have the sense of adventure and satisfaction that comes from reading a good book -- and, I might add, a good newspaper article,\' she said.\" more... from NewsFlash.
Here\'s still more from CNN.

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